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The one skill the Australian Federal Police needs from you

Left: AFP Commissioner Andrew Colvin. (Photos: Getty)
Left: AFP Commissioner Andrew Colvin. (Photos: Getty)

Australia is in the midst of a war for talent: several industries, such as the healthcare and legal sector, are struggling to fill job vacancies.

It’s not helped by the fact that Australian culture still has a long way to go in “attracting and retaining talent” without “fantastic after-dark fun and 24-hour amenities”.

And it looks like the Australian Federal Police (AFP) isn’t exempt from this fight to attract talent, either.

What skill they’re looking for? Cyber skills.

“We see cybercrime and our technical skills to be the future of the organisation,” AFP commissioner Andrew Colvin told a senate committee hearing on Friday.

“[Recruiting] is a constant challenge for us in this space,” IT News first reported Colvin saying.

Why is it so hard to find someone with these skills?

It’s a mix of factors: firstly, government agencies are competing with private firms – and bigger paypackets – for top talent.

Secondly, the skill is ‘perishable’ – which mean they can go out-of-date if they aren’t practised or brushed up on regularly.

The other reason is that the skill is highly sought after, and there simply aren’t that many people with the skills of a cybercrime investigator.

“So no sooner do you have someone on the hook that they might end up going to another industry or private industry,” Colvin said.

“It’s a constant challenge for us to keep our cybercrime skills up.”

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