UA - Under Armour, Inc.

NYSE - Nasdaq Real-time price. Currency in USD
9.19
-0.00 (-0.05%)
As of 2:28PM EDT. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close9.19
Open9.15
Bid9.20 x 2900
Ask9.21 x 1400
Day's range8.91 - 9.46
52-week range6.37 - 24.55
Volume7,949,201
Avg. volume6,379,900
Market cap4.418B
Beta (5Y monthly)0.60
PE ratio (TTM)37.04
EPS (TTM)0.25
Earnings date25 Apr 2018 - 30 Apr 2018
Forward dividend & yieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-dividend dateN/A
1y target est13.50
  • Why Shares of Foot Locker, Hanesbrands, and Under Armour All Jumped Today
    Motley Fool

    Why Shares of Foot Locker, Hanesbrands, and Under Armour All Jumped Today

    Shares of apparel retailers were rising fast in late-day trading on Wednesday, with Foot Locker (NYSE: FL) up 7%, Hanesbrands (NYSE: HBI) jumping nearly 11%, and Under Armour (NYSE: UA)(NYSE: UAA) almost 9% higher. While rivals like Walmart (NYSE: WMT) and Target (NYSE: TGT) were allowed to stay open because they also sold food, they continued selling apparel, sporting goods, and other merchandise that the specialty retailers were prohibited from remaining open and selling themselves. Athletic wear may be helping three apparel retailers soar today.

  • Under Armour Has Now Reopened Almost Half of Its Company-Owned U.S. Stores
    Motley Fool

    Under Armour Has Now Reopened Almost Half of Its Company-Owned U.S. Stores

    In an update on its retail operations, Under Armour (NYSE: UA)(NYSE: UAA) said that as of Friday, it will have opened nearly 50% of its branded, company-owned stores in the U.S. It said it will continue to open its doors on a case-by-case basis, in line with rules and conditions set by public officials.

  • Why Under Armour Stock Moved Higher Today
    Motley Fool

    Why Under Armour Stock Moved Higher Today

    What happened Shares of Under Armour (NYSE: UA) (NYSE: UAA) were gaining today for the second day in a row as the sportswear brand continued to climb on hopes for an economic recovery. Investors were also rotating out of high-priced growth stocks and into cheap cyclical stocks like Under Armour that have been hit hard by the pandemic.

  • Why Under Armour, Hanesbrands, and Capri Holdings Jumped Today
    Motley Fool

    Why Under Armour, Hanesbrands, and Capri Holdings Jumped Today

    Shares of Under Armour (NYSE: UAA) (NYSE: UAA), Hanesbrands (NYSE: HBI), and Capri Holdings (NYSE: CPRI) were among the big winners Tuesday as the broad market rallied on economic reopenings continuing and signs that more companies were entering the vaccine race. Apparel retailers have been hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic as they were forced to close stores, being non-essential retailers.

  • Motley Fool

    A Closer Look at Soaring Fintech Bill.com

    In this episode of Industry Focus: Financials, host Jason Moser and Fool.com contributor Matt Frankel, CFP, take an in-depth look at the company and what investors need to know. Plus, hear Jason and Matt discuss why they're keeping an eye on Goldman Sachs (NYSE: GS) and Intuit (NASDAQ: INTU). To catch full episodes of all The Motley Fool's free podcasts, check out our podcast center.

  • Why Shares of Under Armour Fell This Morning but Have Since Recovered
    Motley Fool

    Why Shares of Under Armour Fell This Morning but Have Since Recovered

    The paper will be offered to qualified institutional buyers, and those investors will have an option to purchase up to $60 million more in aggregate. Analyst Mike Zuccaro commented, "Widespread temporary store closures and weaker discretionary consumer spending will result in significant incremental pressures on Under Armour's revenue, profitability and cash flow in 2020." Institutional investors that buy convertible notes often go short the underlying stock as part of a convertible arbitrage strategy, which may have contributed to selling pressure earlier in the session.

  • Under Armour (UAA) Looks Good: Stock Adds 6.7% in Session
    Zacks

    Under Armour (UAA) Looks Good: Stock Adds 6.7% in Session

    Under Armour (UAA) saw a big move last session, as its shares jumped nearly 7% on the day, amid huge volumes.

  • Better Buy: Lululemon vs. Under Armour
    Motley Fool

    Better Buy: Lululemon vs. Under Armour

    Both of these niche apparel retailers have their fans, but one is better-positioned to thrive in a marketplace reshaped by COVID-19.

  • CEO of North Face and Vans owner says he is hunting for deals
    Yahoo Finance

    CEO of North Face and Vans owner says he is hunting for deals

    Yahoo Finance catches up with V.F. Corp CEO Steve Rendle to discuss how the owner of Timberland and Vans is navigating the chopping retail environment.

  • Here's Why Shares of Under Armour Are Climbing Today
    Motley Fool

    Here's Why Shares of Under Armour Are Climbing Today

    Leadership changes on the company's board and positive coronavirus vaccine news fueled investor optimism.

  • Motley Fool

    How Lockdowns Are Impacting Automobile Makers

    In this episode of MarketFoolery, Chris Hill chats with Motley Fool analyst Jason Moser about the latest earnings releases. There is a surprising new player in the e-commerce space. They discuss some April CPI figures and talk about some automobile, consumer apparel, live entertainment stocks and much more.

  • How Alibaba’s Lazada Turned Produce Dumped In Virus Crisis Into a Business
    Bloomberg

    How Alibaba’s Lazada Turned Produce Dumped In Virus Crisis Into a Business

    (Bloomberg) -- Follow Bloomberg on LINE messenger for all the business news and analysis you need.Farmers in Cameron Highlands, a cradle of Malaysia’s agricultural industry, dumped hundreds of tons of produce in March after Covid-19 lockdowns shuttered wholesale markets and restaurants across the nation. They also gave Alibaba a chance to crack a difficult arena.Lazada Group SA, the Southeast Asian subsidiary of Alibaba Group Holding Ltd., opened a virtual store to link farmers and homebound Malaysians. The uptake surprised even the e-commerce giant: consumers bought an average of 1.5 tons of cabbages, carrots and spinach each day. On the fourth day, 3.5 tons of veggies were sold in less than half an hour. By the third week, about 70 tons had been delivered from farms to doorsteps across the country.Fresh groceries -- now one of the top three categories on Lazada Malaysia -- weren’t even an option there three months ago. Before the novel coronavirus, Lazada had dedicated grocery arms only in Singapore, Thailand and the Philippines; after the outbreak, it’s expanded to Malaysia, Vietnam and Indonesia. It’s keen to maintain that momentum, backed by 30 fulfillment centers across 17 cities in the region.“Covid-19 is a catalyst of digital transformation in Southeast Asia,” Lazada Group Chief Executive Officer Pierre Poignant said in an interview. “When consumers build a habit, it doesn’t easily go away. E-commerce will become a way of life.”Read more: Southeast Asia’s Internet Economy to Top $100 Billion This YearDemand for fresh groceries has surged globally, but the spike in Malaysia opened a window in particular for China’s largest online commerce company into a lucrative market after years of building one of the region’s largest delivery networks. Since March, more agricultural entrepreneurs, fisheries and local businesses have started to pivot brick-and-mortar business to e-commerce, according to Lazada Malaysia Chief Operating Officer Shah Suriye Rubhen. The festive period of Ramadan, in a country where more than half the population is Muslim, has also galvanized demand and farmers have responded by increasing their assortment of goods on offer.“Local SMEs are realizing that digitizing their business is the way forward to remain sustainable in the long-term, diversify their revenue stream, and market to the increasingly growing internet economy,” Shah said.Alibaba’s unit may have scored in Cameron Highlands, but the wider Southeast Asian market remains heavily contested.Read more: New Alibaba Chief Explains Why He Wants to Kill His Own BusinessLazada, started in 2012 by Rocket Internet before Alibaba eventually bought full control of the company, was the first e-commerce outfit to serve six countries in Southeast Asia. But its fiercest rival Shopee, a unit of Singapore’s Sea Ltd., has expanded aggressively in the past year and overtaken Lazada as the most visited website in 2019, according to research firm iPrice Group.In Indonesia, the largest and most promising market in the region, Alibaba-backed Tokopedia ranks as the top e-commerce company based on web traffic, followed by Shopee, Bukalapak and Lazada. Blibli is the online grocery leader, while “Shopee, Tokopedia and Lazada are playing fast catch-up,” said Roshan Raj, a Singapore-based partner at research firm RedSeer Consulting.It’s not just the e-commerce giants -- the resurgence in online grocery has attracted new entrants from adjacent industries. Singapore’s Qoo10 Pte was particularly swift to act when the government ordered bubble tea shops to temporarily shut along with other non-essential services, offering DIY bubble tea kits. Even meal delivery firm Foodpanda started grocery delivery.At home in Singapore, Lazada’s Lazmall, where brands sell directly to consumers, has recently attracted big names like Under Armour Inc. in Singapore and Thailand, Starbucks Corp. and 3M Co. in Indonesia and department store chain Robinsons, which is shutting one of its three Singapore outlets in August.“There are brands that I would not have imagined would come to e-commerce,” Poignant said.The 41-year-old Frenchman, a co-founder who took the helm last year, says Lazada is interested in grocery deals, including acquisitions and joint ventures, in Southeast Asia. “We are very open to that,” he said, adding the company isn’t in concrete discussions at the moment. His firm last month teamed up with Indonesia’s Rumah Sayur Group to source vegetables from 2,500 farmers in West Java.Lazada acquired Singaporean e-grocer RedMart in 2016. It struggled to meet demand and had to temporarily suspend new grocery orders in April to make adjustments. Poignant said changes made to RedMart helped the company serve 50% more customers each day a month later.“Southeast Asia’s e-commerce market is likely to move from a subsidy game to a quality game,” said Lai Chang Wen, CEO of Singapore-based Ninja Van, which helps e-commerce clients deliver more than a million packages daily in the region. “This shift will be pivotal and have a lasting impact.”Read more: Alibaba Bets on Frenchman to Lead High-Stakes Southeast Asia ExpansionPoignant argues Alibaba’s technologies will help differentiate Lazada, starting with live-streaming. He said Lazada is the only player in Southeast Asia that allows consumers to immediately buy items they see on a stream. By the end of June, Lazada plans to host more than 1,000 daily sessions, up from 4,000 per week now. In April, some 7,000 new live stream accounts were created, up 70% from the pre-pandemic era.Alibaba’s artificial intelligence technology is another asset. Lazada has more than 100 people working on personalizing its experience, part of Lazada’s 9,000-strong workforce across six countries.For the Chinese e-commerce behemoth, Lazada is the single most important piece of its globalization strategy. It aims to serve 300 million Southeast Asians by 2030, up from 65 million now, according to Poignant.Underscoring that ambition, Alibaba last week struck a deal to buy half of Singapore’s AXA Tower, valued at S$1.68 billion ($1.2 billion). Poignant says the 50-story landmark, already home to 3,000 Lazada staff, has very good feng shui. The cylindrical structure was inspired by a stack of coins and originally built as the country’s Treasury Building in 1986. Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong once had an office in the building, Poignant added.“Southeast Asia is an absolutely critical market for Alibaba,” he said.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Motley Fool

    Why You Need Marriott on Your Watch List

    In this episode of MarketFoolery, Chris Hill and Motley Fool analyst Ron Gross go through the latest headlines from Wall Street. To catch full episodes of all The Motley Fool's free podcasts, check out our podcast center. To get started investing, check out our quick-start guide to investing in stocks.

  • Why Under Armour Stock Is Tumbling Again Today
    Motley Fool

    Why Under Armour Stock Is Tumbling Again Today

    While that's not a surprise for its physical retail presence, what is surprising is Under Armour's inability to capitalize on its e-commerce channel, which it once described as one of its "largest long-term growth opportunities." CFO Dave Bergman said Under Armour was renegotiating its contracts with them and in a number of cases, "we've been able to get some extended payment terms." The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Under Armour (A Shares) and Under Armour (C Shares).

  • Under Armour (A Shares) (UAA) Q1 2020 Earnings Call Transcript
    Motley Fool

    Under Armour (A Shares) (UAA) Q1 2020 Earnings Call Transcript

    UAA earnings call for the period ending March 31, 2020.

  • Why Under Armour Stock Was Sinking Today
    Motley Fool

    Why Under Armour Stock Was Sinking Today

    Shares of the sportswear maker tumbled as it revealed the impact of the coronavirus on its first quarter.

  • Under Armour has a chance to radically shift its strategy out of coronavirus—but will it?
    Yahoo Finance

    Under Armour has a chance to radically shift its strategy out of coronavirus—but will it?

    One way for Under Armour can revive growth is to pull back, get smaller, and focus more on profits.

  • Cisco, Applied Materials, Under Armour and Norwegian Cruise are part of Zacks Earnings Preview
    Zacks

    Cisco, Applied Materials, Under Armour and Norwegian Cruise are part of Zacks Earnings Preview

    Cisco, Applied Materials, Under Armour and Norwegian Cruise are part of Zacks Earnings Preview

  • Under Armour Sees Double-Digit Decline in the First Quarter
    Motley Fool

    Under Armour Sees Double-Digit Decline in the First Quarter

    Total revenue decreased 23% (22% on a currency-neutral basis) to $930 million, with about 15 percentage points of the decline related to COVID-19. The company said e-commerce represented a low double-digit part of total revenue, and that in North America and the Europe and Middle East regions it was showing favorable trends.

  • Under Armour (UAA) Reports Q1 Loss, Misses Revenue Estimates
    Zacks

    Under Armour (UAA) Reports Q1 Loss, Misses Revenue Estimates

    Under Armour (UAA) delivered earnings and revenue surprises of -78.95% and -2.55%, respectively, for the quarter ended March 2020. Do the numbers hold clues to what lies ahead for the stock?

  • 3 Things to Watch in the Stock Market This Week
    Motley Fool

    3 Things to Watch in the Stock Market This Week

    After the government announced that the unemployment rate set a new record high of 14.7%, both the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJINDICES: ^DJI) and the S&P 500 (SNPINDEX: ^GSPC) gained ground on Friday, landing at an over 2% boost for the full week. Several highly anticipated earnings reports are set to arrive over the next few trading days, including from Under Armour (NYSE: UA) (NYSE: UAA), Macy's (NYSE: M), and JD.com (NASDAQ: JD). Under Armour announces its results on Monday, and investors are bracing for plenty of bad news in that report.

  • Retail sales, Fed Chair Jerome Powell speaks: What to know in the week ahead
    Yahoo Finance

    Retail sales, Fed Chair Jerome Powell speaks: What to know in the week ahead

    COVID-19 and its impact on the U.S. economy will continue to take centerstage in the week ahead.

  • Face Mask Production Saving Retailers Amid Coronavirus
    Zacks

    Face Mask Production Saving Retailers Amid Coronavirus

    A number of apparel brands are not only supplementing for the shortage of protective gear but also looking for a survival strategy by selling facial masks and other protective gear.