NFLX - Netflix, Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real-time price. Currency in USD
361.76
-8.32 (-2.25%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
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Previous close370.08
Open367.47
Bid360.16 x 1300
Ask361.70 x 3100
Day's range357.51 - 370.80
52-week range252.28 - 393.52
Volume4,860,768
Avg. volume7,837,331
Market cap158.743B
Beta (5Y monthly)1.23
PE ratio (TTM)87.59
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings dateN/A
Forward dividend & yieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-dividend dateN/A
1y target estN/A
  • Disney an early streaming winner as Americans are stuck indoors amid coronavirus pandemic
    Yahoo Finance

    Disney an early streaming winner as Americans are stuck indoors amid coronavirus pandemic

    At-home entertainment is seeing a dramatic surge amid the coronavirus pandemic, with streaming platforms like Disney+ (DIS) and Netflix (NFLX) benefitting.

  • Netflix Stock Falls 3%
    Investing.com

    Netflix Stock Falls 3%

    Investing.com - Netflix (NASDAQ:NFLX) Stock fell by 3.03% to trade at $358.92 by 12:32 (16:32 GMT) on Friday on the NASDAQ exchange.

  • ‘Tiger King’ creator: Joe Exotic reminds me of Trump
    Yahoo Finance

    ‘Tiger King’ creator: Joe Exotic reminds me of Trump

    “You can see parallels between Joe and our current president,” Eric Goode said.

  • Zacks Market Edge Highlights: Facebook, Alphabet, Apple, Amazon and Netflix
    Zacks

    Zacks Market Edge Highlights: Facebook, Alphabet, Apple, Amazon and Netflix

    Zacks Market Edge Highlights: Facebook, Alphabet, Apple, Amazon and Netflix

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Netflix, Akamai, DocuSign and Teladoc
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Netflix, Akamai, DocuSign and Teladoc

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Netflix, Akamai, DocuSign and Teladoc

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Regeneron, Netflix, Clorox, NVIDIA and SBA
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Regeneron, Netflix, Clorox, NVIDIA and SBA

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Regeneron, Netflix, Clorox, NVIDIA and SBA

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Moderna, Regeneron, Zoom Video, Netflix and Peloton
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Moderna, Regeneron, Zoom Video, Netflix and Peloton

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Moderna, Regeneron, Zoom Video, Netflix and Peloton

  • Disney+ beat Netflix in recent US downloads (report)
    TechCrunch

    Disney+ beat Netflix in recent US downloads (report)

    Netflix may still dominate global streaming, but Disney+ has made a huge splash in the United States, where it launched in November. Now a new report from mobile intelligence company Apptopia and customer engagement platform Braze suggests that Disney's streaming service has continued its spectacular success into 2020. The report examines the months leading up to and after the service's U.S. launch, and it includes charts of the most popular streaming apps for the first three months of 2020.

  • Financial Times

    Netflix or Amazon? Fashion TV goes head to head

    Christian Siriano, the American designer whose career was launched by reality show Project Runway, and who now serves as the show’s on-screen mentor, is currently sewing surgical face masks in bulk for the governor of New York. While Siriano has diverted his attention from red carpet gowns to masks, fans of the show that kick-started his career will find themselves with plenty of television to while away their hours at home. Project Runway, the 15-year-old, mass-market show in which fashion moguls such as Michael Kors and Zac Posen judge the work of aspiring designers through a series of contests, has now spawned two streaming service copycats — including a new series on Amazon that Entertainment Weekly described as “first rate quarantine TV”.

  • Apple's New Deal With Amazon Prime Video Is a Game Changer
    Bloomberg

    Apple's New Deal With Amazon Prime Video Is a Game Changer

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- What was once sacrosanct is no more. Apple Inc. seems to have blinked.Late Wednesday, Bloomberg News reported that Apple has relaxed its rules requiring a 30% cut for any content sold inside video apps on its iOS platform. The tech giant said its program allows “premium subscription video” providers the ability to charge consumers directly using their own payment systems without paying a commission to Apple.For customers of Amazon.com Inc., which started taking advantage of the change on Wednesday,  it means Amazon’s Prime Video subscribers in the U.S., U.K. and Germany, can now buy or rent video content using the e-commerce company’s app on Apple’s platforms. Amazon.com Inc. had previously only allowed video purchases outside of Apple’s ecosystem, such as its website. Canal+, owned by Vivendi SA, and Altice USA Inc.’s Altice One had already joined Apple’s program in recent years.As recently as last year, Apple CEO Tim Cook told CBS News the company didn’t have a dominant position in any market. But analysts have said Apple’s App Store may be the one business where it actually had excessive power over developers, because of the steep commission it was able to demand in exchange for allowing their apps, in-app purchases and subscriptions to be sold on its platforms. (The 30% subscription fee is lowered to 15% after the first year.)The Apple App Store’s high commission structure has been infuriating for many companies. In 2019, music-streaming company Spotify  Technology SA filed a complaint against Apple with the European Commission, while Epic Games Inc. CEO Tim Sweeney, whose company makes Fortnite, has consistently railed against Apple’s commission structure as unjustified. Netflix Inc. even abandoned using Apple’s payment system altogether to avoid the fee in 2018.Why did Apple budge? Perhaps it’s a move to preempt further pressure from regulators. Whatever the reason, once the first step is made toward lower fees, there is no turning back.It’s only a matter time before other companies such as Netflix, Spotify and countless others ask for better terms as well. Lower middle-man fees can also be good news for consumers if it leads to lower prices, too.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tae Kim is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering technology. He previously covered technology for Barron's, following an earlier career as an equity analyst.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg

    HBO, Meet Your New Streaming Overlord

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Just weeks from the launch of its all-important HBO Max product, WarnerMedia is getting a new boss straight from the streaming world. Jason Kilar, who ran Hulu in its early days, is set to take over as CEO of AT&T Inc.’s WarnerMedia division on May 1, the company announced Wednesday. He’ll have oversight of not only the various media networks — HBO, CNN, TBS, TNT, TruTV, Cartoon Network — and the Warner Bros. film studio, but also the product at the center of AT&T’s latest effort to become a dominant force in streaming TV. That’s HBO Max, a $15-a-month app that will serve as the new digital destination for viewers who want to binge on re-runs of “Friends,” relive “Game of Thrones” and have access to new content with the HBO flavor.Kilar, 48, is replacing John Stankey, the longtime AT&T executive who has been juggling two titles: head of WarnerMedia and chief operating officer of the Dallas-based wireless parent company. Killar will report to Stankey, who began his career at one of the Baby Bells and is now considered a top candidate to become AT&T’s next CEO when Randall Stephenson retires. The leadership of the new AT&T is taking shape, though the WarnerMedia gig wasn’t necessarily an easy sell for industry veterans watching the messy integration from afar.Kilar is an interesting choice. Nine years ago, he infamously wrote a memo that read like an obituary for traditional TV, according to Rich Greenfield, an analyst for LightShed Partners, who found a digital copy. “History has shown that incumbents tend to fight trends that challenge established ways and, in the process, lose focus on” customers, Kilar wrote, needling Hulu’s partners at the time (it’s now controlled by Walt Disney Co.). That means HBO, after being led for two years by a wireless executive who knew little about traditional media, will now be led by someone who cares nothing for it. After the Jerry Maguire-like manifesto, one news headline asked if Kilar was trying to get fired; now that kind of thinking has gotten him the top job at a Hollywood giant.Following his time at Hulu, Kilar went on to create a $3-a-month subscription-video service called Vessel. He sold it in 2016 to Verizon Communications Inc., which shut doMn the service days later and put the Vessel team to work on its own go90 mobile-video product. It was part of Verizon’s failed expansion into media, with go90 now also long gone. Kilar’s arrival marks another step on AT&T’s stormy path to become an entertainment juggernaut that can compete with Disney and Netflix Inc. That journey began when AT&T acquired Time Warner in June 2018, after initially facing government resistance and later, skepticism from AT&T’s own shareholders that the megamerger would work. (The company’s last major deal, for the DirecTV satellite service, was already creating enough headaches.) Since then, Stankey has reshuffled the Warner ranks, occasionally creating controversy among employees who weren’t on board with the changes. He told me in an interview last year that he was working to have Warner’s sub-brands work closer together toward a common mission of making HBO Max a success.With most everyone stuck home because of the coronavirus pandemic and binge-watching TV, some have wondered why Stankey hasn’t pushed up the release of HBO Max. Doing so might help it capture more subscribers faster. Although, more time spent watching doesn’t necessarily translate into more money for streaming services, since viewers pay a monthly rate to access an all-you-can-stream buffet of content. The CEO transition may be yet another reason that WarnerMedia is being patient. There’s also tremendous pressure on AT&T to prove it can get this right, not least because it’s saddled with about $180 billion of debt as the U.S. economy hurtles toward a recession.Last fall, I wrote a piece asking, “Is AT&T’s Hollywood plot too far-fetched?” In the coming months, Kilar will help provide the answer. This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tara Lachapelle is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the business of entertainment and telecommunications, as well as broader deals. She previously wrote an M&A column for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Is Netflix (NFLX) Outperforming Other Consumer Discretionary Stocks This Year?
    Zacks

    Is Netflix (NFLX) Outperforming Other Consumer Discretionary Stocks This Year?

    Is (NFLX) Outperforming Other Consumer Discretionary Stocks This Year?

  • Are the FAANG Stocks on Sale During the Coronavirus Crisis?
    Zacks

    Are the FAANG Stocks on Sale During the Coronavirus Crisis?

    With the sudden bear market in US stocks, could your favorite large cap growth stocks suddenly be true value stocks?

  • S&P Sees Worst-Ever Q1: 5 Stocks That Gained in the ETF
    Zacks

    S&P Sees Worst-Ever Q1: 5 Stocks That Gained in the ETF

    Though all 11 sectors in the S&P 500 index were down in the quarter, information technology and healthcare fared better than others.

  • Disney (DIS) to Beam Disney+ in India Amid Coronavirus Shutdown
    Zacks

    Disney (DIS) to Beam Disney+ in India Amid Coronavirus Shutdown

    Disney (DIS) is set to pose challenges to Netflix, Amazon prime video and local providers through the launch of its Disney+ streaming service in India on April 3.

  • Top Stock Trades to Beat Coronavirus Blues in April
    Zacks

    Top Stock Trades to Beat Coronavirus Blues in April

    The coronavirus pandemic has hit markets bad. But investors shouldn't shun stocks in April but should instead look for avenues to invest in areas under focus owing to rise in infected cases.

  • 6 Top S&P 500 Stocks That Have Surged Despite Worst-Ever Q1
    Zacks

    6 Top S&P 500 Stocks That Have Surged Despite Worst-Ever Q1

    The disappointing performance in Q1 is not due to any economic, financial or geopolitical factors but instead a health hazard ??? the coronavirus pandemic.

  • Netflix (NFLX) Gains As Market Dips: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    Netflix (NFLX) Gains As Market Dips: What You Should Know

    Netflix (NFLX) closed the most recent trading day at $375.50, moving +1.22% from the previous trading session.

  • Bloomberg

    Which Bills Will You Stop Paying First?

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- What’s more important: a roof over your head or a car in your driveway? With unemployment rising as the coronavirus shuts down parts of the U.S. economy, the decision made by borrowers as their payments come due will determine how securities backed by auto loans and leases perform.Families will start to struggle as Covid-19 deepens its grip and job losses rise. Of the $14 trillion of consumer debt, mortgages account for $9 trillion and cars $1.3 trillion; however, more Americans have auto loans. When social distancing becomes the norm, cars seem more likely to fall down the priority list behind payments for homes, Netflix bills, phones and credit cards. With lockdowns spreading, many people aren’t going anywhere right now. That means the default risk is rising. Rating agencies are reassessing portfolios of loans and leases linked to asset-backed securities, or ABS, using loss levels from the 2008 financial crisis to calculate risk.When these car-related debts start going bad, the impact on the bonds they back is severe. The spread of auto ABS over Treasuries widened sharply in recent weeks, more so than on card-backed debt. The current dislocations in credit markets show that while auto-loan defaults may not be the center of a financial crisis like mortgage-backed securities, they could well set off wider panic as consumer confidence crumbles, household balance sheets deteriorate and big issuers – car companies – struggle.This market has grown rapidly since the last financial crisis. Already this year, almost $30 billion of auto asset-backed bonds have been issued in the U.S., following $118 billion in 2019. As of the third quarter last year, $250 billion was outstanding. At year-end, annualized loss rates on subprime auto ABS were around 9%, close to financial-crisis levels, while average interest rates have been even higher at 19%, according to Goldman Sachs Group Inc.Two factors will determine how these bonds perform: unemployment and the value of used cars, because cash flows come directly from borrowers. In the aftermath of a natural disaster, used-car prices rise because property has been damaged or destroyed. In this crisis, they’re likely to fall due to strain on consumer wallets. That reduces the worth of the collateral and lowers the residual value of leases that back some of these securities. Cars are, after all, a depreciating asset.What does this mean for the securitized bonds? Lenders and originators package pools of loans and leases in a special-purpose vehicle that then issues debt to investors. The interest and principal payments are structured into classes. Broadly, the more senior tiers have first claim on all cash flows and assets, while the junior take the first hit on losses but have higher yields. The lowest tranche, also known as the equity or first-loss pieces, is typically held by the issuer: auto companies’ financing arms and other lenders.  When loans default and the asset pool can’t make up for the payments due to investors, the holders of the lower tranches absorb the loss.It will be yet another blow for the finance companies of already-struggling carmakers that issue ABS to finance leases and sales. They’ll take the first hit through the equity. Funding costs will surge and in turn squeeze sales, reminiscent of 2008.(3)As sales showed signs of reaching a plateau last year, auto giants, dealers and finance companies were pushing excessive financing with looser underwriting standards and conditions, such as longer terms and incentives. The weighted average credit score for non-prime loan pool borrowers was 590 last year, lower than 597 in 2008.Household balance sheets were strong overall going into this crisis, but varied greatly across income levels. The bottom 20% of American households are far more leveraged — more than 25% — than the higher income brackets on a debt-to-assets basis. Around a third of auto ABS are typically made up of subprime loans, where the ability to pay drops off sharply and suddenly.That doesn’t bode well. Companies like Ally Financial Inc. have already offered relief packages for consumers and dealers. Payments can be deferred for six months without late fees. New customers will be allowed to defer for three months. The Federal Reserve has brought back a financial crisis-era lending facility that’s meant to support the asset-backed securities market, where auto loans and leases are among the eligible collateral.The troubles will go further: There are other auto sector-related ABS, like those backed by rental cars and dealer-floor financing plans that are even more directly dependent on automakers’ health.Sure, structures have changed since 2008 to help lower the risk for investors on these bonds. But the underlying issues remain the same: consumers’ buying and borrowing behavior.Investors are busy thinking about mortgage-backed securities, given their large size and potentially deeper and more immediate impact on the financial system. But it’s important to consider recent consumer trends: Delinquencies as a portion of outstanding loans have been on the way down for mortgages. They’re rising for autos, especially among subprime borrowers, as are past-due loans. America has always been a nation of drivers and the appeal of cars has a way of pushing consumers to stretch their budgets in a way houses don’t. But the stay-in-place strategies to fight this pandemic may change that calculus in a way investors aren’t prepared for: Driving behavior could change.(1) Unable to secure affordable financing, the financing arms severely curtailed lending and leasing activity. This caused vehicle sales volumes to plummet and hastened the Chapter 11 bankruptcy filings of Chrysler on April 30, 2009, and General Motors Inc. on June 1, 2009, according to S&P Global Ratings.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Anjani Trivedi is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering industrial companies in Asia. She previously worked for the Wall Street Journal. For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Continued Coronavirus-Imposed Social Distancing Perks Up 5 Stocks
    Zacks

    Continued Coronavirus-Imposed Social Distancing Perks Up 5 Stocks

    Here we focus on a basket of stocks that is benefiting from a lengthy spell of social distancing in the United States and across other countries.

  • Netflix Stock Rises 3%
    Investing.com

    Netflix Stock Rises 3%

    Investing.com - Netflix (NASDAQ:NFLX) Stock rose by 3.16% to trade at $382.49 by 10:20 (14:20 GMT) on Tuesday on the NASDAQ exchange.

  • Will Facebook and Amazon Need Quarantining After Covid-19?
    Bloomberg

    Will Facebook and Amazon Need Quarantining After Covid-19?

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- There are no atheists in foxholes, and no tech regulators in a coronavirus lockdown.What was once thunderously described as “surveillance capitalism” is now a pandemic necessity. Twitch is where our children go to school; Twitter where epidemiological models are debated; and WhatsApp where we have drinks with friends. Some 40% of the world’s population is living under lockdown, according to AFP, creating exactly the kind of bored and isolated citizens whose fingers linger over their Facebook app button, as my colleague Alex Webb notes. Our personal information is hoovered up as before, but data privacy is now gone from our hierarchy of needs.Likewise, the market power that made Big Tech look so dangerous makes it look vital and dependable now. Amazon.com Inc., which has always wanted to be the Everything Store, is now the Only Store in cities like Paris or San Francisco, where it’s an essential lifeline for a myriad of household goods (with some restrictions) that can’t always be found in the grocery stores or drugstores that are still operating. The iniquities of the gig economy are still as outrageous as ever — as complaints by Amazon’s workers show — but there’s no mistaking the message sent by the company’s pledge to hire 100,000 more people: A firm once under fire for killing the economy now is the economy.Where does that leave the “techlash,” the drumbeat of outrage against data-extracting, competition-killing platforms banged on by consumers, small firms and government regulators? At first glance, as Wired magazine recently surmised, it’s dead — or at least in hibernation — as the focus shifts from constraining Big Tech to supporting it to ensure it can reach all of us in this time of need.In fact, we may already be seeing the contours of a new, post-virus grand bargain between Big Tech and Big State.It says something that the most high-profile move from the European Union in recent weeks has been to ask the bosses of Netflix Inc., and Alphabet Inc.’s Google and YouTube to throttle streaming quality to reduce Internet congestion. The EU’s technocrats in Brussels, the land of sweeping data-privacy laws, are now eying the use of smartphone geolocation metadata — anonymized, of course — to monitor the outbreak. Digital rules designed to boost the EU’s technological sovereignty are being re-thought, the FT reports.What the current crisis has emphasized is how much of what the tech industry’s billionaire-run corporations provide resemble essential public, or quasi-public, goods and services. As the virus has shut schools, libraries and public parks in some cities, those spaces have moved online. Information, education, and health care in these times are overwhelmingly reliant on the Internet — and by extension dependent on the FAANG firms (and Microsoft Corp.), which as of last year accounted for more than 40% of all traffic. It’s hard to imagine the genie will be put back in the bottle. Even once countries lift lockdowns, Big Tech will retain its power.Which is why, when we emerge from self-isolation to rebuild the post-Covid-19 society, we can’t just return to the earlier status quo. The virus has already prompted governments across the world to re-think where the fire hose of financial stimulus should be aimed in an emergency, with trillions in aid going to support workers, hospitals and the unemployed, not just big business. A similar re-think is due for tech platforms. If they’re going to provide essential public goods, they need to be held to a higher standard.If social media firms are our sidewalks and parks, they should be kept clean — virtually speaking — of misinformation and bad actors. If e-commerce platforms are delivering vital medical equipment for the authorities, they shouldn’t traffic in fakes or quack cures. If online marketplaces are infrastructure for small firms and gig workers, they must be run fairly. And if collecting and processing our personal data helps the greater good of healthcare, more benefits should accrue to the public by ensuring that what’s being collected, and how it’s handled, isn’t harmful. Oceans of data generated by what Stephen Roberts of the London School of Economics calls the “digital turn” of health surveillance will require new rules and explicit terms of engagement to limit abuse.The message is starting to get through to the companies themselves, which have tended to drag their feet in the past. Facebook Inc. is taking down harmful misinformation related to the new coronavirus and redirecting users to public health authorities. Amazon has banned more than one million products that falsely promised to cure the coronavirus. Google is banning promotional ads for medical masks so they aren’t hoarded by panic-buyers. A new Covid-19 data partnership between Britain’s National Health Service and tech firms, including Google and Palantir Technologies Inc., has explicitly promised to abide by EU data-privacy principles and destroy its data store after the pandemic. It will take regulatory pressure to make sure this isn’t all just for show.In return for responding more proactively to the prodding of watchdogs, Big Tech will probably find itself in less political hot water in the future, and justifiably so. The current pandemic has focused our minds on the common good and decreased polarization in several countries — in the U.S., for example, Republicans’ and Democrats’ views toward coronavirus concerns  are gradually converging. If online platforms that have historically tended toward some toxic behaviors can themselves undergo a similar refresh, it will be one step in the right direction.If there is the risk of another techlash appearing on the horizon, however, it’s that we don’t know what the long-term effects will be of Big Tech making peace with Big Brother — namely, a state that has also expanded its emergency powers, surveillance capabilities and size during the crisis. The mix could prove toxic in the long run, even if for now, it’s helping the common good. We’ll have to keep our eyes open.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Lionel Laurent is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering Brussels. He previously worked at Reuters and Forbes.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.