NFLX - Netflix, Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real-time price. Currency in USD
291.56
-7.04 (-2.36%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT

291.00 -0.56 (-0.19%)
Pre-market: 9:02AM EDT

Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close298.60
Open294.99
Bid290.56 x 900
Ask291.48 x 1000
Day's range287.45 - 296.05
52-week range231.23 - 386.80
Volume7,841,539
Avg. volume7,119,715
Market cap127.655B
Beta (3Y monthly)1.48
PE ratio (TTM)114.79
EPS (TTM)2.54
Earnings date16 Oct. 2019
Forward dividend & yieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-dividend dateN/A
1y target est386.90
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Netflix Co-Founder Marc Randolph Weighs In on the Streaming Wars
    Bloomberg

    Netflix Co-Founder Marc Randolph Weighs In on the Streaming Wars

    Sep.17 -- Marc Randolph, Netflix Inc. co-founder and former chief executive officer, discusses how Netflix is changing the face of television and the competition between content and streaming platforms with Bloomberg's Taylor Riggs on "Bloomberg Technology."

  • Financial Times

    FirstFT: Today’s top stories 

    on Wednesday by 25 basis points, to a range of 1.75-2 per cent. But it signalled that easing could end there despite uncertainty over trade and fierce pressure from the White House for further accommodation. The statement drew an immediate response from Donald Trump, who tweeted: “Jay Powell and the Federal Reserve Fail Again.

  • Roku (ROKU) Shares Plummet as More Companies Enter the Streaming Race
    Zacks

    Roku (ROKU) Shares Plummet as More Companies Enter the Streaming Race

    Roku (ROKU) shares closed down almost 14% on Wednesday as social media giant Facebook (FB) announced that they would be jumping on the streaming bandwagon.

  • Cord Cutting COSTS!
    Zacks

    Cord Cutting COSTS!

    Are you REALLY "cutting" the cord.

  • Streaming Space Heats Up: Battle For Exclusive Rights
    Zacks

    Streaming Space Heats Up: Battle For Exclusive Rights

    Cable is at the end of its market cycle as streaming services enter the growth phase. Media firms are pivoting to remain competitive in the evolving digital economy.

  • Streaming Services Declare War Over Exclusive Rights
    Zacks

    Streaming Services Declare War Over Exclusive Rights

    Cable is at the end of its market cycle as streaming services enter the growth phase. Media firms are pivoting to remain competitive in the evolving digital economy.

  • Zacks Investment Ideas feature highlights: Netflix, Amazon, Disney and Apple
    Zacks

    Zacks Investment Ideas feature highlights: Netflix, Amazon, Disney and Apple

    Zacks Investment Ideas feature highlights: Netflix, Amazon, Disney and Apple

  • GlobeNewswire

    The Klein Law Firm Reminds Investors of Class Actions on Behalf of Shareholders of NFLX, CARB, TWOU and SRPT

    NEW YORK, Sept. 18, 2019 -- The Klein Law Firm announces that class action complaints have been filed on behalf of shareholders of the following companies. If you suffered a.

  • Could Facebook’s Video Streaming Device Upset Roku?
    Market Realist

    Could Facebook’s Video Streaming Device Upset Roku?

    Facebook is preparing to challenge Roku in the video streaming device market as the social media giant looks to a future beyond advertising.

  • Facebook Enters Living Room With Video Chat-Focused TV Box
    Bloomberg

    Facebook Enters Living Room With Video Chat-Focused TV Box

    (Bloomberg) -- Facebook Inc. on Wednesday upgraded its Portal video chat devices, with a new model for TVs and lower prices. It also said users can opt out of the company accessing voice recordings collected by the hardware.With the new products, called Portal TV, Portal, and Portal Mini, Facebook is trying to break into the crowded smart speaker and connected living room markets.The Portal TV, which goes on sale for $149 in October, can be connected to a TV set with standard HDMI cable and has a camera and several microphones to enable video calling via Facebook’s Messenger and WhatsApp services.The device supports Spotify, along with Amazon’s Prime Video service, Ring cameras and Alexa voice assistant. But it lacks content from Netflix Inc. and some other popular video-streaming services. That may make it difficult to compete without the range of video and apps offered by rival streaming devices from Roku Inc., Apple Inc. and Amazon.com Inc.Facebook executive Andrew Bosworth emphasized in a demonstration that the device’s primary purpose is video calling. That’s the company’s unique sales proposition and people will likely use additional devices for content that they can’t get via the Portal TV, he said.Facebook’s new Portal smart display devices, coming later in October, will sell for $129 and $179, down from the previous $199 starting price. The devices still come in two sizes, 8-inch and 10-inch variations. The new versions have improved speakers and a physical shutter that can either disable both the camera and microphone or just the camera.Facebook said it will transcribe some audio clips collected by the Portal devices, but users will be able to opt out.Facebook first launched its video-calling hardware in 2018, following a series of privacy scandals. The company doesn’t report Portal sales, but it slashed the price in half earlier this year. Bosworth said sales and consumer reception of the device were “warmer” than expected, but he declined to provide specific figures.To contact the reporters on this story: Mark Gurman in Los Angeles at mgurman1@bloomberg.net;Kurt Wagner in San Francisco at kwagner71@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jillian Ward at jward56@bloomberg.net, Alistair Barr, Andrew PollackFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Netflix Falls 3%
    Investing.com

    Netflix Falls 3%

    Investing.com - Netflix (NASDAQ:NFLX) fell by 3.07% to trade at $289.44 by 11:57 (15:57 GMT) on Wednesday on the NASDAQ exchange.

  • Financial Times

    Ofcom chief urges online media levy to fund public broadcasting

    provision, if necessary through a levy, Britain’s media watchdog has suggested. Ms White’s comments highlight the potential significance of Ofcom’s review of public sector broadcasting, which looks at how public remit television can be funded and delivered in a sector that is being transformed by digital technology.

  • Financial Times

    Netflix: how will the story end?

    On a sunny midsummer weekend in Los Angeles, Netflix turned the Santa Monica Pier — one of the city’s busiest tourist destinations — into a three-dimensional marketing blitz, transforming it into the fictional 1980s Indiana town where its hit show Stranger Things is set. The July 4 arrival of the third series of Stranger Things was the “biggest content drop” of 2019 for Netflix, says Bernstein analyst Todd Juenger. Unfortunately for Netflix it was two weeks too late.

  • Financial Times

    Tripping the light fantastic era

    From London Bridge to the Millennium Bridge, four spans have been subtly wired with an ever-changing lighting system, the work of the artist Leo Villareal, who carried out a similar project on the Bay Bridge in San Francisco. Fifteen Thames bridges will eventually be lit by the Illuminated River Foundation, with Philips lighting spin-off Signify providing the technology. The advantages of LEDs over conventional lighting, in terms of their long life and energy and cost savings, have been understood for years, but the ability to control them and add sensors and other chips to the mix, connected through the Internet of Things, has vastly enhanced the possibilities of technology that already has a huge installed base of light sockets and lampposts.

  • Financial Times

    Smart TVs sending private data to Netflix and Facebook

    The smart TVs in our homes are leaking sensitive user data to companies including Netflix, Google and Facebook even when some devices are idle, according to two large-scale analyses. Researchers from Northeastern University and Imperial College London found that a number of smart TVs, including those made by Samsung and LG, and the streaming dongles Roku and Amazon’s FireTV were sending out data such as location and IP address to Netflix and third-party advertisers. The data were being sent whether or not the user had a Netflix account.

  • Netflix (NFLX) Outpaces Stock Market Gains: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    Netflix (NFLX) Outpaces Stock Market Gains: What You Should Know

    Netflix (NFLX) closed the most recent trading day at $298.60, moving +1.46% from the previous trading session.

  • Netflix Buys "Seinfeld" as the Streaming Wars Heat Up.
    Zacks

    Netflix Buys "Seinfeld" as the Streaming Wars Heat Up.

    Netflix Buys "Seinfeld" as the Streaming Wars Heat Up.

  • GlobeNewswire

    CLASS ACTION DEADLINES: Bernstein Liebhard LLP Reminds Investors in ABMD, NFLX, and CARB of Filing Deadlines

    Bernstein Liebhard LLP announces that class action complaints have been filed on behalf of shareholders of ABMD, NFLX, and CARB. If you wish to serve as lead plaintiff, you must move the court by the lead plaintiff deadlines listed below. A lead plaintiff is a representative party acting on behalf of other class members in directing the litigation.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Netflix, AMC, Lyft, Uber and Slack
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Netflix, AMC, Lyft, Uber and Slack

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Netflix, AMC, Lyft, Uber and Slack

  • AT&T Faces a Lawsuit from a Group of Investors
    Market Realist

    AT&T Faces a Lawsuit from a Group of Investors

    AT&T; is facing a lawsuit from a group of investors. According to the lawsuit, the company misled investors about DIRECTV NOW's growth.

  • Netflix’s Recent Small Move Could Have a Big Impact
    Market Realist

    Netflix’s Recent Small Move Could Have a Big Impact

    As competition heats up in the video streaming space, Netflix (NFLX) has made a small software update that could have a big impact on its business.

  • GlobeNewswire

    CLASS ACTION UPDATE for NFLX, KPTI, GTT and EVH: Levi & Korsinsky, LLP Reminds Investors of Class Actions on Behalf of Shareholders

    NEW YORK, Sept. 17, 2019 -- Levi & Korsinsky, LLP announces that class action lawsuits have commenced on behalf of shareholders of the following publicly-traded companies..

  • AT&T Is New. It Needs a New Type of CEO.
    Bloomberg

    AT&T Is New. It Needs a New Type of CEO.

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- AT&T Inc. is a very different company today from the wireless-service provider it was five years ago. CEO Randall Stephenson, who transformed AT&T by acquiring pay-TV and media assets such as HBO, is now eyeing retirement. It raises the question of whether the man who appears to be the next in line – John Stankey, another three-decade veteran of the phone business – is the right person for the job.Stephenson, who has been at the helm since June 2007, is interested in stepping down as soon as next year, the Wall Street Journal reported Friday, citing unnamed sources. For much of his 37 years at the telephone giant, Stephenson has worked alongside Stankey, who he’s been priming to take over as the next CEO. While speaking at an investor conference Tuesday morning, he praised Stankey’s leadership, saying that he would have to be on “the very short list of people” who could run AT&T’s diverse set of businesses. But Stankey has also emerged as a controversial figure within AT&T, so much so that his recent promotion to the role of chief operating officer is largely what motivated Elliott Management Corp. to press ahead with an activist investor campaign, according to people familiar with the shareholder’s thinking. (Last week, Elliott sent a public letter to AT&T’s board calling for it to review ways to improve earnings and the stock price.)AT&T may benefit from running a broader search for Stephenson’s replacement, and outside pressure led by Elliott may give the board one more reason to do so. The $273 billion company could use someone with more expertise in growing media properties and who’s willing to part with weaker assets that are serving as distractions. While wireless data plans and business connectivity services still drive the bulk of AT&T’s profits, the company generates half its revenue elsewhere, such as pay-TV subscriptions, cable networks and the box office.Under Stephenson, 59, AT&T morphed into a communications and media conglomerate through the 2015 acquisition of DirecTV for $67 billion, followed by last year’s $102 billion takeover of Time Warner, a business unit now called WarnerMedia. Stankey, 56, is in charge of WarnerMedia, in addition to his new duties as COO of AT&T. During Stephenson’s tenure, Stankey has been his go-to for overseeing special projects, such as buying spectrum and helping the Time Warner merger clear the courts.Stephenson has been criticized for his bold dealmaking, and yet I don’t think his plan to reinvent AT&T was inherently bad. He has a vision for the company to be a leader in entertainment, which people are increasingly consuming on mobile devices, and 5G wireless networks like AT&T’s will facilitate more of that. But Stephenson did overpay for DirecTV, and he may have underestimated the challenge of integrating both that business and WarnerMedia, the latest tasks assigned to Stankey. As two executives who have worked in the telephone industry since their early 20s, they perhaps not surprisingly may have difficulty operating media assets, especially at a time when Netflix Inc. has changed what it means to watch TV.­­­AT&T’s lagging stock price looks to be the consequence of an incoherent strategy and an attempt to juggle too many things at once: building 5G, devising a plan for WarnerMedia, paying down debt and managing the decline of the DirecTV satellite business. There have also reportedly been tensions between Stankey and his new Hollywood employees. It’s said that his approach and at times irascible personality have clashed with that of WarnerMedia’s veterans. Richard Plepler, the former HBO boss, is among those who have departed. One can see why Stankey’s attempt to break down silos in WarnerMedia was a necessary step and one that wouldn’t sit well with legacy top brass. And to his credit, he brought in Bob Greenblatt, who formerly ran Comcast Corp.’s NBCUniversal and before that Showtime, to manage WarnerMedia’s entertainment properties and streaming platforms. It also seems likely that Stankey will name a new chief to oversee all of WarnerMedia. Still, it’s concerning that more of HBO’s top people are said to be leaving in the next few weeks, in part due to frustrations with Stankey, as NBC News reported Tuesday morning.The capstone project of Stankey’s WarnerMedia integration is HBO Max, a Netflix-like streaming-TV service that’s expected to launch next spring. Plans for that service seem to be ever-changing, and Stankey’s handling of the roll-out stands in contrast to Walt Disney Co.’s meticulous approach to the Disney+ app, which launches Nov. 12. WarnerMedia also recently struck a production deal with director J.J. Abrams for an exorbitant amount of money that a company like Disney probably wouldn’t have offered, as I wrote last week. A key date for Stankey and WarnerMedia is Oct. 29, which is when investors will get a first look at HBO Max.The topic of succession is a valid concern. Any conglomerate could benefit from having a CEO for whom there are no sacred cows. At best, Stankey may promise more of the same, which investors haven’t been that pleased with lately. At worst, he could be at risk of botching AT&T’s transformation. His compensation looks high when viewed through that lens. After the Time Warner deal closed in June of last year, Stankey’s base salary more than doubled to $2.9 million, which AT&T said was “to reflect the increased scope and complexity of his new role as CEO of WarnerMedia.” He also received a $2 million “merger completion bonus.” Including stock grants and performance-linked awards, Stankey’s total realized compensation was $12.74 million. That was 89% higher than what John Donovan, the outgoing CEO of AT&T Communications – a division larger than WarnerMedia – earned in 2018. (1)The Wall Street Journal reported that the board supports Stankey, citing a person familiar with its thinking who said there aren’t many outside the company “who would be obvious candidates to run a complicated media and communications business.” But isn’t it at least worth looking around? And if the answer is that no one is capable of doing it, then perhaps all these businesses don’t belong together.(1) Stephenson earned $18.84 million. AT&T hasn’t said yet how Stankey’s pay will be adjusted to reflect his COO promotion.To contact the author of this story: Tara Lachapelle at tlachapelle@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tara Lachapelle is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the business of entertainment and telecommunications, as well as broader deals. She previously wrote an M&A column for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • NBCUniversal to Take on Netflix With ‘Peacock’ Streaming Service
    Bloomberg

    NBCUniversal to Take on Netflix With ‘Peacock’ Streaming Service

    (Bloomberg) -- NBCUniversal revealed the name and initial lineup for its new online TV platform, aiming to challenge Netflix Inc. and other streaming rivals with more than 15,000 hours of programming.The service, slated to debut in April 2020, will be called Peacock, a tip of the hat to NBC’s logo. It will include reruns of NBC shows, including “The Office” and “Parks and Recreation,” as well as a slate of original shows, the Comcast Corp. division said on Tuesday.Peacock will join a crowded field of streaming services, all of which are fighting for TV viewers’ eyeballs and wallets. Walt Disney Co. and Apple Inc. are both launching offerings in November, while AT&T Inc.’s WarnerMedia is readying a product for early next year.Peacock’s original programming will include a “Battlestar Galactica” reboot from “Mr. Robot” creator Sam Esmail and the drama “Dr. Death” starring Alec Baldwin. It also will feature comedies from the likes of Jimmy Fallon, Seth Meyers and Lorne Michaels.The company will draw heavily on its vault of content. In addition to streaming reruns, Peacock will reboot the comedies “Saved by the Bell” and “Punky Brewster.”Peacock also will offer more than 3,000 hours of Spanish-language programming from Telemundo.To contact the reporter on this story: Nick Turner in Los Angeles at nturner7@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Nick Turner at nturner7@bloomberg.net, John J. Edwards IIIFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Netflix Acquires Seinfeld Rights, Partners Canal+ in France
    Zacks

    Netflix Acquires Seinfeld Rights, Partners Canal+ in France

    Netflix's (NFLX) acquisition of streaming rights of popular comedy Seinfeld will help it fill up the gap in its content portfolio post the departure of shows like Friends and The Office.