INTC - Intel Corporation

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real-time price. Currency in USD
57.61
-0.61 (-1.05%)
At close: 4:00PM EST

57.66 +0.05 (0.09%)
After hours: 6:12PM EST

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Previous close58.22
Open58.34
Bid57.61 x 3000
Ask57.69 x 3200
Day's range57.49 - 58.65
52-week range42.86 - 59.59
Volume14,239,779
Avg. volume18,561,295
Market cap249.226B
Beta (3Y monthly)0.93
PE ratio (TTM)13.49
EPS (TTM)4.27
Earnings date22 Jan 2020 - 27 Jan 2020
Forward dividend & yield1.26 (2.16%)
Ex-dividend date2019-11-06
1y target est56.41
  • Japan, South Korea Rescue Intelligence Pact After U.S. Push
    Bloomberg

    Japan, South Korea Rescue Intelligence Pact After U.S. Push

    (Bloomberg) -- Japan and South Korea struck a last-minute deal to rescue their expiring intelligence-sharing pact, after a high-powered push from the Trump administration averted a blow to U.S. efforts to strengthen its Asian alliance network.South Korea will suspend its plans to pull out of the General Security of Military Information Agreement and temporarily withdraw a complaint it made against Japan at the World Trade Organization, Kim You-geun, South Korea’s national security first vice adviser, said in a news briefing Friday, about six hours before the pact was due to expire.The decision -- which had been a key focus of U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper during a trip to Asia over the past week -- was quickly applauded by the Pentagon. “The Secretary thanks both the governments of ROK and Japan for working to find a path forward and keep working together as allies,” according to a Defense Department statement. “The agreement is important to sharing vital intelligence, particularly in a timely manner with regard to any type of North Korean actions, and it sends a strong message that we are united against regional and shared threats.”The pact was set to formally cease to exist at 12 a.m. Saturday, three months after South Korea moved to end the deal amid a history-laden dispute with Japan. The three-year-old pact was seen as important because it demonstrated the neighbors’ ability to cooperate independently from Washington to counter shared threats including China and North Korea.Japan and South Korea agreed to start talks on export controls put in place by Tokyo, Yoichi Iida, a trade control director with Japan’s Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, said at a separate briefing in Tokyo. South Korea has demanded the removal of the curbs, which it saw as a political tool that undermined trust.Both sides tried to show they were able to get their point of view over to their neighbor. “I believe South Korea made a decision from a strategic viewpoint,” Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe told reporters, while Kim said the Japanese government has expressed understanding of Seoul’s moves.The decision by Japan and South Korea marked a rare reversal in their tensions that have plunged to new depths in recent years and spilled over to hurt their trade, tourism and relations with their main security ally, the U.S.“Establishing a dialogue channel is a step in the right direction,” said Duyeon Kim, a senior adviser with the International Crisis Group. “But it has been a mistake for Seoul to view GSOMIA as a bilateral issue with Japan when it’s a mechanism that helps protect South Korea from the shared challenges of North Korean and regional security threats, with the help of the U.S. and Japan.”Troop RiskThe Pentagon had warned that allowing the pact to end would “increase risk” to some 80,000 U.S. troops stationed in the two countries, while Esper said in Seoul that the only ones benefiting from friction between Japan and South Korea “are Pyongyang and Beijing.” North Korea has reminded all three of the risks, test-firing a series of new ballistic missiles since May that weapons experts said can deliver a nuclear warhead to all of South Korea and most of Japan.The agreement would have been the most significant casualty yet of a dispute between Abe and South Korean President Moon Jae-in that rapidly escalated over the past year as the U.S. sat largely on the sidelines. President Donald Trump has pushed allies for troop-funding increases and trade concessions over maintaining multilateral relationships. Esper and Pompeo faced the difficult task of asking South Korea to compromise with Japan, while carrying Trump’s demands for a five-fold increase in military funding.Earlier this year, Japan removed South Korea from its “white list” of trusted export destinations and curbed exports of several items vital to production in the country’s high-tech manufacturing industry. The moves came after a series of South Korean court rulings demanding Japanese companies to compensate Korean workers forced into labor during Japan’s 1910-45 occupation of the peninsula.“The breakdown of the Japan-South Korea relationship makes any gesture to demonstrate the health of U.S. alliance network extremely difficult, if not impossible,” said Yuki Tatsumi, director of the Japan Program at the Stimson Center in Washington.(Updates to add Pentagon chief’s comments in TKTK paragraph)\--With assistance from Shinhye Kang, Sophie Jackman, Emi Nobuhiro, Jihye Lee, Gareth Allan and Glen Carey.To contact the reporters on this story: Kanga Kong in Seoul at kkong50@bloomberg.net;Isabel Reynolds in Tokyo at ireynolds1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Brendan Scott at bscott66@bloomberg.net, Jon Herskovitz, Bill FariesFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • 3 Tech Stocks for Growth Investors to Buy Now with Stock Market Near Highs
    Zacks

    3 Tech Stocks for Growth Investors to Buy Now with Stock Market Near Highs

    Let's dive into three tech stocks we found with our Zacks Stock Screener that growth investors might want to consider buying right now as the stock market remains near its new highs...

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Intel, Advanced Micro Devices, Alphabet, Taiwan Semiconductor and NVIDIA
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Intel, Advanced Micro Devices, Alphabet, Taiwan Semiconductor and NVIDIA

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Intel, Advanced Micro Devices, Alphabet, Taiwan Semiconductor and NVIDIA

  • Bloomberg

    Japan, South Korea Make Last-Minute Push to Save Intel Pact

    (Bloomberg) -- Japan and South Korea made a last-ditch effort to save their expiring intelligence pact, after the Trump administration pressed its two allies to prevent their feud from dealing a lasting blow to the U.S.’s regional security network.The two sides were having “positive” discussions about a potential resolution to their standoff over the General Security of Military Information Agreement, according to a person familiar with the talks. The pact, which allows the two allies to share information independently from the U.S., will cease to exist at 12 a.m. Saturday local time without a compromise.With just hours to go, South Korean Foreign Minister Kang Kyung-wha decided to attend Group of 20 meetings in Nagoya on Friday that will bring her into contact with her Japanese counterpart, Jiji Press reported. The decision to send Kang came after South Korea’s presidential office held a national security council meeting to discuss the pact, broadcaster KBS reported.The agreement could be the most significant casualty yet of a dispute between Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and South Korean President Moon Jae-in that rapidly escalated over the past year as the U.S. sat largely on the sidelines. A late U.S. push to save the deal, including a Seoul visit last week by Defense Secretary Mark Esper and a call Thursday by Secretary of State Michael Pompeo, resulted in no immediate breakthroughs.The Munhwa Ilbo newspaper reported earlier Friday that a high-level South Korean government official handicapped the chances of an extension at “50-50.”The deal’s expiration would put more strain on America’s postwar network of alliances, as President Donald Trump prioritizes troop-funding increases and trade concessions over maintaining multilateral relationships. Esper and Pompeo faced the difficult task of asking South Korea to compromise with Japan, while carrying Trump’s demands for a five-fold increase in military funding.“The U.S. needs both Japan and South Korea to be on the same page when it comes to their posture vis-a-vis regional security challenges,” said Yuki Tatsumi, director of the Japan Program at the Stimson Center in Washington. “The breakdown of the Japan-South Korea relationship makes any gesture to demonstrate the health of U.S. alliance network extremely difficult, if not impossible.”While a brief meeting between Abe and Moon earlier this month buoyed expectations for a breakthrough, subsequent exchanges have illustrated how far apart the two sides remain. Moon, who was elected in 2017 on a promise to reconsider his predecessors’ deals with Abe, reaffirmed his stance this week not to revive the pact unless Japan withdraws export controls imposed on South Korea over the summer.Japan removed South Korea from its “white list” of trusted export destinations and curbed exports of several items vital to production in the country’s high-tech manufacturing industry. The moves came after a series of South Korean court rulings demanding Japanese companies to compensate Korean workers forced into labor during Japan’s 1910-45 occupation of the peninsula.Abe and Moon have few incentives to back down from a fight that has proved popular among their nationalistic political bases, even as Japanese trade restrictions and South Korean boycotts put pressure on their economies. Japanese Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga told reporters Friday that the the government’s position hasn’t changed and called on South Korea to reach a “wise decision” on GSOMIA.Pompeo stressed the importance of maintaining ties with Japan during a phone call with Kang as the deadline neared, but the South Korean foreign minister had already told her country’s parliament that GSOMIA was going to expire unless Japan changed its attitude.The Pentagon has warned that allowing the pact to end would “increase risk” to some 80,000 U.S. troops stationed in the two countries, while Esper said in Seoul that the only ones benefiting from friction between Japan and South Korea “are Pyongyang and Beijing.” North Korea has reminded all three of the risks, test-firing a series of new ballistic missiles since May that weapons experts said can deliver a nuclear warhead to all of South Korea and most of Japan.North Korean state media published a commentary Wednesday celebrating the pact’s imminent demise. “It was a due decision and another victory achieved by the candlelight demonstrators in South Korea,” the Korean Central News Agency said.Meanwhile, China has moved to improve relations with both Japan and South Korea as the two U.S. allies come under pressure from Trump on trade and security costs. Chinese Premier Li Keqiang is slated to host Abe and Moon for a three-way summit in southwestern city of Chengdu next month.\--With assistance from Jihye Lee.To contact the reporters on this story: Kanga Kong in Seoul at kkong50@bloomberg.net;Isabel Reynolds in Tokyo at ireynolds1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Brendan Scott at bscott66@bloomberg.net, Jon Herskovitz, Peter PaeFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • The Intel-AMD Showdown
    Zacks

    The Intel-AMD Showdown

    It's beginning to look like a really interesting market.

  • 3 Dividend-Paying Tech Stocks to Buy Right Now on Growth Opportunities
    Zacks

    3 Dividend-Paying Tech Stocks to Buy Right Now on Growth Opportunities

    Despite the U.S.-China trade setback, stocks could still climb in 2019 and beyond, and the tech industry remains a key growth driver. Therefore, we searched for tech companies with our Zacks Stock Screener that also pay a dividend...

  • Trade War Updates, Trump & Apple, Target Earnings & Buy This Chip Stock
    Zacks

    Trade War Updates, Trump & Apple, Target Earnings & Buy This Chip Stock

    The latest U.S.-China trade war news. President Trump's Apple factory trip. Retail earnings, including Target. And why Applied Materials (AMAT) is a Zacks Rank 1 (Strong Buy) stock right now, all on today's episode of Free Lunch...

  • HP (HPQ) to Post Q4 Earnings: What's in Store for the Stock?
    Zacks

    HP (HPQ) to Post Q4 Earnings: What's in Store for the Stock?

    HP's (HPQ) fourth-quarter fiscal 2019 results are likely to reflect high demand in the commercial PC market. However, weakness in the Printing business might have posed a threat to the stock.

  • Investing.com

    StockBeat: AMD Slumps on Downgrade as Analyst Warns of Profit-Taking Ahead

    Investing.com - Advanced Micro Devices (NASDAQ:AMD) has racked up impressive gains this year. Before Thursday, shares were up more than 120%. But one Wall Street analyst downgraded AMD Thursday and warned that investors are likely to cash in on the chipmaker's rally in the year ahead.

  • Bull of the Day: Applied Materials, Inc. (AMAT)
    Zacks

    Bull of the Day: Applied Materials, Inc. (AMAT)

    Bull of the Day: Applied Materials, Inc. (AMAT)

  • Dell Introduces Solutions to Expand HPC and AI Portfolio
    Zacks

    Dell Introduces Solutions to Expand HPC and AI Portfolio

    Dell (DELL) introduces solutions to drive HPC and AI innovation.

  • 5 Corporate Giants That Popped After Latest Earnings Release
    Zacks

    5 Corporate Giants That Popped After Latest Earnings Release

    A few corporate behemoths that reported their last earnings results less than five weeks ago, popped after releasing earnings results.

  • AMD at Supercomputing 2019: New Platforms, Deal Wins & More
    Zacks

    AMD at Supercomputing 2019: New Platforms, Deal Wins & More

    AMD unveils new platforms and declares new deal wins on strength in its 2nd Gen EPYC processors and Radeon Instinct GPU accelerators at Supercomputing 2019 event.

  • NVIDIA & Microsoft Intend to Democratize Use of Supercomputer
    Zacks

    NVIDIA & Microsoft Intend to Democratize Use of Supercomputer

    NVIDIA (NVDA) and Microsoft attempt to democratize the utilization of supercomputer by enabling companies to rent the robust capabilities of one according to demand.

  • Intel at Supercomputing 2019: Xe Architecture GPUs & More
    Zacks

    Intel at Supercomputing 2019: Xe Architecture GPUs & More

    Intel (INTC) makes a slew of announcements at Supercomputing 2019 event pertaining to its latest GPUs based on Xe architecture, and divulged details on OneAPI software and Aurora exascale system.

  • Investing.com

    StockBeat - Chip Stocks Rise as Huawei Granted Another Reprieve on Trade Ban

    Investing.com – Chip stocks climbed Monday as semiconductor companies like Micron Technology that count Huawei as an important customer were given a lifeline after the U.S. extended a license that lifts restrictions on U.S. companies from selling or transferring technology to Huawei.

  • BD's Onclarity HPV PMA Submission to Boost Women's Health
    Zacks

    BD's Onclarity HPV PMA Submission to Boost Women's Health

    Becton, Dickinson (BDX) offers a wide range of next-generation solutions in the field of cervical, ovarian and breast cancer.

  • 5 Blue-Chip Stocks to Buy as Dow Breezes Past 28,000
    Zacks

    5 Blue-Chip Stocks to Buy as Dow Breezes Past 28,000

    We highlight blue-chip companies slated to gain in the near term as they have large market capitalization, strong balance sheet and solid cash flow.

  • 3 Semiconductor Stocks to Buy After Strong Earnings on 2020 Chip Growth
    Zacks

    3 Semiconductor Stocks to Buy After Strong Earnings on 2020 Chip Growth

    We searched for semiconductor stocks utilizing our Zacks Stock Screener that investors might want to consider buying ahead of what could be a strong year for chip companies in 2020...

  • Quantum Leap for Computing Is a Small Step for Computers
    Bloomberg

    Quantum Leap for Computing Is a Small Step for Computers

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- In a landmark paper published in 1950, the mathematician Alan Turing proposed the eponymous Turing Test to decide whether a computer can demonstrate human-like intelligence. To pass the test, the computer must fool a human judge into believing it’s a person after a five-minute conversation conducted via text. Turing predicted that by the year 2000, a computer would be able to convince 30% of human judges; that criterion became a touchstone of artificial intelligence.Although it took a bit longer than Turing predicted, a Russian chatbot presenting itself as a 13-year-old Ukrainian boy named Eugene Goostman was able to dupe 33% of judges in a competition held in 2014. Perhaps the cleverest aspect of the machine’s design was that its teenage disguise made it more likely that people would excuse its broken grammar and general silliness. Nevertheless, the strategy of misdirection comes across as transparent and superficial in conversations the chatbot had with skeptical journalists — so much so that one marvels not at the computer’s purported intelligence, but at the gullibility of the judges. Sadly, conquering the Turing Test has brought us no closer to solving AI's big problems.Last month, quantum computing achieved its own controversial milestone. This field aims to harness the laws of quantum mechanics to revolutionize computing. Classical computers rely on memory units called bits that encode either zero or one, so a state of the memory is a sequence of zeros and ones. Quantum computers, by contrast, use qubits, each of which encodes a “combination” of zero and one. In a quantum computer, multiple qubits interact, which means that each of the exponentially(1) many sequences of bits is represented simultaneously.The key question is whether this strange power can be exploited to perform computations that are beyond the reach of classical computers. Demonstrating even one such computation, however contrived, would lead to “quantum supremacy” — a term coined by physicist John Preskill of the California Institute of Technology in 2012. By this standard, Google appears to have achieved quantum supremacy. Specifically, the company said in October that its team used a 53-qubit quantum computer to generate random sequences of bits, which depend on controlled interactions between its qubits. By Google’s calculations it would take 10,000 years to carry out the same task using classical computation.(2) There is no doubt that controlling a 53-qubit quantum computer is a feat of science and engineering. As Preskill put it, “the recent achievement by the Google team bolsters our confidence that quantum computing is merely really, really hard,” rather than being “ridiculously hard.”As long as Google’s quantum computer works as intended, however, its dominance isn’t surprising — because the competition is rigged. It’s a bit like building a robotic hand that flips coins according to given parameters (such as, totally off the top of my head, the angle between the normal to the coin and the angular momentum vector), and then challenging a classical computer to generate sequences of heads and tails that obey the same laws of physics. This robot hand would perform astounding feats of coin-flipping but wouldn’t be able to do kindergarten arithmetic — and neither can Google’s quantum computer.It’s unclear, therefore, whether quantum supremacy is a meaningful milestone in the quest to build a useful quantum computer. To mention just one major obstacle (there are several), reliable quantum computing requires error correction. The catch is that quantum error correction protocols themselves demand fairly reliable qubits — and lots of them.In some ways, quantum supremacy is akin to iconic AI milestones like the Turing Test, or IBM’s chess victory over Gary Kasparov in 1997, which was also an engineering tour de force. These achievements demonstrate specialized capabilities and garner widespread attention, but their impact on the overarching goals of their respective fields may ultimately be limited.The danger is that excessive publicity creates inflated expectations of an imminent revolution in computing, despite measured commentary from experts. AI again provides historical precedent: The field has famously gone through several AI winters — decades in which talent fled and research funding ran dry — driven in large part by expectations that failed to materialize.Quantum computing research started three decades after AI, in the 1980s, and experienced a burst of excitement following the invention in 1994 by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology mathematician Peter Shor of a quantum algorithm that would, in theory, crush modern cryptography. But eventually the dearth of, well, quantum computers caught up with quantum computing, and by 2005 the field was experiencing a massive downturn. The current quantum spring started only a few years ago; its signs include a surge of academic research as well as major investments by governments and tech giants like Alphabet Inc., International Business Machines Corp. and Intel Corp.Quantum computing and AI are two distinct fields — despite what whoever came up with the name Google AI Quantum would have you believe — and what is true for one isn't necessarily true for the other. But quantum computing can learn from AI's much longer career as an alternatively overhyped and underappreciated field. I am tempted to say that the chief lesson is “winter is coming,” but it is actually this: the pursuit of artificial milestones is a double-edged blade.(1) I am reminded of a mathematician’s plea to stop abusing the word “exponentially”; here I am using it in a way he would approve of.(2) The calculation was credibly disputed by IBM, but both companies agree that quantum computers are vastly more efficient than classical computers at this particular task.To contact the author of this story: Ariel Procaccia at arielpro@cs.cmu.eduTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Jonathan Landman at jlandman4@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Ariel Procaccia is an associate professor in the computer science department at Carnegie Mellon University. His areas of expertise include artificial intelligence, theoretical computer science and algorithmic game theory.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Investing.com

    StockBeat: AMD Gets Some Data Center Wall Street Love

    Investing.com – The good times are returning to data-center products as clients are set to ramp-up spending, likely leading to higher deamnd for AMD’s chips, RBC said as it upgraded its price target on the chipmaker Friday.

  • It’s Not Just Farmers—U.S. Exports May Never Recover From the Trade War
    Bloomberg

    It’s Not Just Farmers—U.S. Exports May Never Recover From the Trade War

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. The Trump administration’s trade war is ravaging exports to China across the U.S. and well beyond the farm belt, new data from the U.S. Commerce Department show.More than 30 states stretching from Florida to Alaska suffered double-digit drops in merchandise exports to China through September of this year. Sales to the Asian nation fell 39% in Texas, where oil and gas products comprise the largest export to that country.In Alabama, which touts its status as the No. 3 auto-exporting state in the U.S., total shipments to China plunged 49% in the first nine months. Florida’s merchandise sales to the country slumped 40% in the period, while West Virginia and Wisconsin each saw drops of about 25%. Product exports to China from the U.S. as a whole dropped 15% to $78.8 billion.“Chinese demand for imports overall has been weak,” said Brad Setser, senior fellow for international economics at the Council on Foreign Relations. The recovery time for various U.S. products will depend on the nature of the trade deal, he said. “In some cases, U.S. exports will never recover,” he added.Washington state, home of Boeing’s industrial base, saw total Chinese merchandise exports fall 45% through the third quarter amid the grounding of the 737 Max, the company’s best-selling jet.China has struck back in the trade war by imposing duties on about $135 billion of U.S. goods, targeting everything from farming products like soybeans and pork to motorcycles, cosmetics and wigs. With talks underway for a phase-one deal, Beijing has re-upped its demands for the removal of tariffs the U.S. has put on $360 billion of Chinese imports.Meanwhile, a new report says China’s retaliatory tariffs on U.S. goods likely cost the GOP five House seats in the mid-term 2018 elections, a possible warning sign ahead of next year’s presidential vote. The study didn’t identify the candidates, but it pointed to agricultural tariffs as driving the losses.The trade war, coupled with cuts to health care, “appear to have hurt Republican candidates where swing voters matter most,” said the analysis released this month by the National Bureau of Economic Research.If tariffs remain and companies reduce jobs or wage growth slows due to declining exports, “there’s room for stronger effects on workers and on how they vote” in the 2020 elections, said Emily Blanchard, an economics professor at Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business and an author of the study.That’s not happening yet, said Ahmad Ijaz, an economist at the University of Alabama’s Center for Business and Economic Research.“Although exports to China have fallen sharply in 2019, it hasn’t had any significant impact on payrolls so far,” he said, adding that vehicle manufacturers are hiring workers and some lost sales to China are being offset by gains in other places, particularly Europe.Exports to China support more than a million U.S. jobs, according to the U.S.-China Business Council, which represents American companies doing business in China.Amid the Chinese export carnage are a few bright spots. Buyers are still snapping up semiconductors made in Oregon, primarily by Intel Corp. which operates one of its biggest manufacturing plants in the state. Oregon’s total exports to China surged 65% in the nine months, according to the data. Only about a third of the state’s products are impacted by the proposed tariffs, according to Business Oregon spokesman Nathan Buehler, who said semiconductors for the most part are exempt.Similarly, South Carolina’s sales to China jumped 30% through September, partly on airplane exports. Some Boeing Co. 787 Dreamliner planes are made in the state and about 17% of those aircraft to date have been sold to China. The Chinese were set to buy 100 more Boeing wide-body jets, including the 787 and 777X, but the deal has stalled on trade uncertainties.Indeed, neither South Carolina nor Oregon officials are complacent about the future of their Chinese exports. “It’s the uncertainty that provides so much concern,” Buehler said, noting that potential new tariffs are an obstacle for existing exporters and a barrier for companies weighing the costs of entry. “There’s lots of angst.”\--With assistance from Alex Tribou, Alex Tanzi, Steve Matthews and Yue Qiu.To contact the reporter on this story: Anita Sharpe in Atlanta at asharpe6@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Sarah McGregor at smcgregor5@bloomberg.net, Brendan MurrayFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg

    U.S. Defense Chief Presses South Korea to Pay More for Troops

    (Bloomberg) -- Defense Secretary Mark Esper said during a visit to South Korea that Seoul needed to contribute more to host U.S. troops, after President Donald Trump has asked one of America’s most important military allies to quintuple its current payment.Esper was in is a high-stakes visit to South Korea as part of an eight-day trip through Asia. Its results could determine how well the Trump administration can keep allies Japan and South Korea together as they face threats from the likes of North Korea, and whether other countries hosting U.S. troops will face Trump’s pressure to pay far more to keep them.“Korea is a wealthy country, and could and should pay more to offset the cost of defense,” Esper said Friday. He wanted talks finished by the end of the year with South Korea and added he has been making the same call to other allies for increased funding.Esper -- who will continue on to Thailand, Vietnam and the Philippines -- didn’t mention a specific figure in the joint news conference with South Korean Defense Minister Jeong Kyeong-doo. Jeong said both sides agreed that “the defense cost should be shared at a fair and agreeable level” and the agreement should be reached before the current pact expires.Esper landed in Seoul with Trump demanding South Korea pay about $5 billion for the privilege of hosting U.S. troops, well above the current one-year deal where Seoul pays about $1 billion. The price tag originated with the White House, according to people familiar with the matter, and administration officials justify it by saying it reflects the costs South Korea would incur if it takes operational control of combined U.S.-South Korean forces in the case of a conflict.The request for more money isn’t sitting well in South Korea where many in President Moon Jae-in’s progressive camp and opposition conservatives have come out against demands seen as excessive. Moon, facing a sagging support rate, may not want to make any major concessions that further dent his popularity ahead of an election for parliament next year.Japan PactThe Pentagon boss was also pushing South Korea to keep alive an intelligence-sharing pact with Japan that Seoul is set to let expire on Nov. 23 due to friction with its neighbor. The U.S. has said they should look beyond their troubled ties to the security threat they all face in the region.“The only ones who benefit from expiration of GSOMIA” and “continued friction between Seoul and Tokyo are Pyongyang and Beijing,” Esper said.U.S. Sees Japan-South Korea Thaw as Last Hope to Save Intel PactThe General Security of Military Information Agreement, or GSOMIA, was signed by Japan and South Korea in November 2016. While the agreement doesn’t require the exchange of intelligence and both countries are part of a similar three-way pact with the U.S., the deal was seen as a breakthrough because it demonstrated the ability of Seoul and Tokyo to cooperate independently from Washington.The South Korean Defense minister said he is seeking Esper’s help to persuade Japan to ease up on its export controls, adding “We have some time left until the expiry.”\--With assistance from Shinhye Kang.To contact the reporters on this story: Glen Carey in Seoul at gcarey8@bloomberg.net;Kanga Kong in Seoul at kkong50@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Brendan Scott at bscott66@bloomberg.net, Jon HerskovitzFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg

    Applied Materials Projects Strong Sales on Bounceback in Demand

    (Bloomberg) -- Applied Materials Inc. gave a sales forecast for the current quarter that topped analysts’ estimates, suggesting a slump in orders for chipmaking equipment is ending.The company is the largest maker of machinery used in the manufacture of semiconductors, which are among the most important parts of the electronics supply chain. Customers of the Santa Clara, California-based company include Samsung Electronics Co., Intel Corp. and Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co., giving it a reach that makes its results and forecasts an important early indicator of business confidence. Intel and other chipmakers order equipment months in advance of starting new factories and production lines.Key InsightsFiscal first-quarter sales will be about $4.1 billion, Applied Materials said Thursday in a statement. That compares with analysts’ average estimate of $3.71 billion, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.Adjusted earnings per share will be 87 cents to 95 cents, the company said. Analysts projected 75 cents a share.The results “reflect a healthy uptick in demand for semiconductor equipment, combined with strong execution across the company,” Chief Executive Officer Gary Dickerson said in the statement.Chip-equipment makers often experience wild earnings swings. Machines cost tens of millions of dollars each. Delaying factory build outs is one of the fastest ways a chipmaker can preserve cash when they’re unsure of future demand.Net income was $698 million, or 75 cents a share in the period ended Oct. 27, compared with $757 million, or 77 cents a share, a year earlier.Revenue was little changed at $3.75 billion. Analysts were looking for $3.68 billion.Stock ReactionShares rose about 4% in extended trading after the announcement. The stock closed at $56.96 in New York and has increased 74% this year.More InformationFor more details, click here.To see the statement, click here.To contact the reporter on this story: Ian King in San Francisco at ianking@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jillian Ward at jward56@bloomberg.net, Andrew Pollack, Alistair BarrFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Nvidia, Intel, TSMC, Google and Microsoft
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Nvidia, Intel, TSMC, Google and Microsoft

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Nvidia, Intel, TSMC, Google and Microsoft