GIS - General Mills, Inc.

NYSE - NYSE Delayed price. Currency in USD
52.69
+0.35 (+0.67%)
At close: 4:01PM EST

52.69 0.00 (0.00%)
After hours: 4:57PM EST

Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close52.34
Open52.48
Bid52.74 x 1000
Ask52.75 x 1100
Day's range52.24 - 52.91
52-week range36.42 - 56.40
Volume2,067,223
Avg. volume3,277,492
Market cap31.846B
Beta (3Y monthly)0.69
PE ratio (TTM)17.00
EPS (TTM)3.10
Earnings date17 Dec 2019 - 23 Dec 2019
Forward dividend & yield1.96 (3.74%)
Ex-dividend date2020-01-09
1y target est54.31
  • 3 Top Dividend Stocks to Maximize Your Retirement Income - November 22, 2019
    Zacks

    3 Top Dividend Stocks to Maximize Your Retirement Income - November 22, 2019

    The traditional approaches to retirement planning are longer covering all expenses in nest egg years. So what can retirees do? Thankfully, there are alternative investments that provide steady, higher-rate income streams to replace dwindling bond yields.

  • General Mills (GIS) Outpaces Stock Market Gains: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    General Mills (GIS) Outpaces Stock Market Gains: What You Should Know

    General Mills (GIS) closed at $52.89 in the latest trading session, marking a +0.63% move from the prior day.

  • Does General Mills, Inc. (NYSE:GIS) Have A Good P/E Ratio?
    Simply Wall St.

    Does General Mills, Inc. (NYSE:GIS) Have A Good P/E Ratio?

    Today, we'll introduce the concept of the P/E ratio for those who are learning about investing. We'll apply a basic...

  • Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods have a new foe in the plant-based burger wars: the Ultimate Burger
    Yahoo Finance

    Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods have a new foe in the plant-based burger wars: the Ultimate Burger

    Yahoo Finance gives Conagra Brands' new plant-based Ultimate Burger a try. Here's our takeaway.

  • Hershey Gains From Strong Brands & Efficiency Boosting Plans
    Zacks

    Hershey Gains From Strong Brands & Efficiency Boosting Plans

    Hershey (HSY) gains from SKU rationalization efforts as well as buyouts and innovation. However, rising advertising expenses are a worry.

  • Walmart's stock is trading at a record high and one sentence reveals why
    Yahoo Finance

    Walmart's stock is trading at a record high and one sentence reveals why

    The world’s largest retailer’s third quarter results on Thursday showed that yet again, CEO Doug McMillon continues to pull almost all the right strings operationally.

  • General Mills (GIS) Dips More Than Broader Markets: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    General Mills (GIS) Dips More Than Broader Markets: What You Should Know

    In the latest trading session, General Mills (GIS) closed at $52.36, marking a -0.27% move from the previous day.

  • 3 Top-Ranked Dividend Stocks: A Smarter Way to Boost Your Retirement Income - November 06, 2019
    Zacks

    3 Top-Ranked Dividend Stocks: A Smarter Way to Boost Your Retirement Income - November 06, 2019

    The traditional approaches to retirement planning are longer covering all expenses in nest egg years. So what can retirees do? Thankfully, there are alternative investments that provide steady, higher-rate income streams to replace dwindling bond yields.

  • Al Gore Is Opening a New Front In the War On Climate Change
    Bloomberg

    Al Gore Is Opening a New Front In the War On Climate Change

    (Bloomberg) -- Al Gore’s 400-acre farm is located in Carthage, a small Tennessee town where the former vice president and senator traditionally kicked off his political campaigns. During his second act as a famous environmentalist, the farm became the site of a training program for aspiring climate activists, and more recently, an experiment in what Gore said is the world’s most realistic chance at averting climate catastrophe.Topsoil, the foot or so of ground underneath your feet, is responsible for almost all food production on Earth. It also stores more than three times as much carbon as forests. Today, agriculture is a net carbon emitter, contributing about 14% of all greenhouse gas emissions, but unlike power generation or automobiles, it can be turned into a net absorber, pulling carbon out of the atmosphere.If farming practices are changed through the use of cover crops, low-tilling and tree-planting, Gore said, agriculture conglomerates and family farmers alike could theoretically make their farms more productive while fighting global warming. Those changes can also replenish nutrients to the world’s soil, of which 33% has already been depleted.A virtuous circle if there ever was one—and one that’s already attracting attention from farmers, consumers and food companies.Gore, 71, is preaching the benefits of so-called carbon farming, a form of regenerative farming, at a time when U.S. President Donald Trump has been trying to roll back regulations meant to limit greenhouse gas emissions. And while science-based climate policy has been a prominent topic on the Democratic presidential campaign trail, it’s not always seen as a priority.Gore, who these days is more of a denim-wearing advocate than reserved technocrat, remains undeterred. His laboratory has been the farm where his parents once raised livestock and grew tobacco. Earlier this month, he invited 450 soil experts—farmers, scientists, chefs, food experts, entrepreneurs and investors—to join him there to discuss how to scale regenerative farming into something that might actually slow climate change.“We’ve waited so long to start to address the climate crisis,” Gore told those gathered. “We will need to both reduce emissions drastically and take as much carbon out of the atmosphere as we possibly can.”Unlike 2006, when Gore’s film “An Inconvenient Truth” was met with skepticism in some quarters, 13 years of intensifying storms, catastrophic floods and unprecedented droughts and wildfires have persuaded more Americans that there’s a very big problem. The goal now, Gore said, is to get people to start taking carbon farming seriously.When it comes to actually tackling what may soon become an existential crisis, the numbers are daunting. Trillions of dollars are needed to adapt civilization to the near-term consequences of climate change while tens of trillions of dollars are needed to slow its advance. But Gore said there are still too few plans to reverse global warming that don’t rely on technology that has yet to be developed.“Planting trees and sequestering carbon in soil are likely to remain the two most effective approaches,” Gore said in an interview at his Carthage farm. “There’s already some indication that farms that operate this way are more resilient in the face of climate extremes.”Carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere are at their highest in 3 million years. Oceans, the biggest carbon sinks of all, are acidifying because they hold too much of it. Plant life, which absorbs CO2 through photosynthesis, can sink carbon into the soil. Regenerative farming helps speed that along—with the added benefit of producing more nutrient-rich soil.Rattan Lal, a professor of soil physics and director of Ohio State University’s Carbon Management and Sequestration Center, is the key scientist behind Gore’s thinking. Lal served on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) when it shared a Nobel Prize with Gore in 2007, and was awarded the Japan Prize this year for his work on soil carbon sequestration.The world’s population currently uses more than a third of the planet’s surface for agriculture, according to the United Nations. In the U.S., close to 40% of land is farmland. Soil used for agriculture has degraded and eroded over centuries of use, losing between 20% and 60% of its original carbon content, according to the IPCC. Lal’s research shows that soil can sequester carbon at rates as high as 2.6 gigatons each year. An aggressive, global combination of tree planting and increased vegetation along with soil carbon sequestration, he said, has the “technical potential” to absorb 157 parts per million of CO2.With about 415 parts per million in the air today—a huge jump compared with a few decades ago—removing even a fraction of that could slow the advance of global warming.“There is virtually no analysis that shows the feasibility of doing any of this at scale.”Gore is realistic when it comes to the fraught politics of climate change and the policies that would need to align to make that potential possible. Moreover, carbon farming is a nascent concept in the U.S.: California has a growing program and Hawaii’s plan to become carbon neutral by 2045 includes a carbon farming framework. U.S. Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s “Green New Deal,” supported in some form by several Democratic presidential candidates, simply encourages farmers to improve soil health.But even without any legislation on the horizon, big agriculture is starting to pay attention.Eco-conscious shoppers are beginning to look for food farmed with regenerative practices, just as they do for organic products and sustainable packaging. General Mills set a goal in August to have 1 million acres in its supply chain transitioned to regenerative agriculture by 2030, and a group of companies including Danone North America and Unilever’s Ben & Jerry’s have been working on a certification for food farmed with regenerative practices.Not everyone is convinced its time has come, though. Timothy Searchinger, a research scholar at Princeton University who has studied the issue, said scalable carbon farming is still very much a pipe dream.“There is an unbelievable amount of scientific uncertainty,” Searchinger said. “There is virtually no analysis that shows the feasibility of doing any of this at scale.”Indeed, while there is some evidence that soil carbon can be rebuilt on degraded land, the technique requires putting so much nitrogen in the soil that the technique may not be viable in some places, he said. Additionally, many regenerative farmers discover that after a few years of no-till farming, their yields begin to fall. Searchinger said better options for achieving natural carbon sequestration at scale would be to focus on reducing deforestation and preserving peat lands.“It’s not the most useful thing to do in agriculture,” Searchinger said. While carbon farming would be helpful, he said the bigger agricultural climate issue is methane from livestock, something that might be addressed with feed additives.At its most basic, carbon farming is about leaving the ground alone. Simply plowing and tilling fields can disturb soil’s natural structure, releasing stored carbon into the atmosphere and displacing insects and microbes necessary for healthy soil. No-till farming creates fields that are better at acting like a sponge to absorb both water and carbon.Gore’s home state Tennessee leads the U.S. in no-till farming, with more than 78% of its farmland managed that way, versus 37% for the U.S., according to the Soil Health Institute. On his farm, some 10,000 trees have been planted to increase soil carbon. Small groups of cattle and sheep are rotated to graze in different areas, adding natural fertilizer to soils. The farm uses compost and cover crops to keep the soil healthy, rather than for their profit potential.Regenerative farming has more costs than traditional methods, especially upfront. Only about 108 million acres cross the U.S. are using some regenerative practices, according to Project Drawdown, a climate research group (as of 2012, the government said there were 914 million acres of farmland in America). The group estimates it would cost about $57 billion to convert another 1 billion acres by 2050, but that some 23.15 gigatons of CO2 could be sucked out of the atmosphere by doing so.While not a solution to the climate crisis by itself, Lal told the audience at Gore’s farm that regenerative farming could be, at the very least, “a bridge to the future.”Planting the same cash crops each year without rotating them tends to deplete nutrients from soil. Regenerative farming, meanwhile, results in more nutrient dense-crops. But most farmers don’t have any incentive to change what they are doing, because staples like wheat, rice, soybeans and corn are usually covered by federally-subsidized U.S. crop insurance—a $100 billion industry which currently guarantees that more than 290 million acres of U.S. farmland deliver returns for farmers regardless of the harvest.“For most people, this is a very new idea,” said Will Rodger, director of policy communications at the American Farm Bureau Federation. “We’re certainly aware that carbon can be stored in the soil, but farmers have very narrow margins. Many of our members are looking very closely at it, but the question is how to make it a business.”The U.S. Farmers & Ranchers Alliance proposed earlier this year that lenders find more creative financing models to help farmers employ regenerative practices. A study published this month in Nature Climate Change found that deploying land sector strategies like carbon farming, as well as food waste reduction and increasing plant-based diets, could turn farming into a net absorber of carbon as soon as 2050.Gore predicts that popular adoption of regenerative farming will someday take hold the same way residential solar and electric vehicles have caught on. “Farmers are doing this because they think it’s better for them,” Gore said. “I look for signs of hope.”To contact the author of this story: Emily Chasan in New York at echasan1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: David Rovella at drovella@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • General Mills (GIS) Stock Sinks As Market Gains: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    General Mills (GIS) Stock Sinks As Market Gains: What You Should Know

    General Mills (GIS) closed at $50 in the latest trading session, marking a -1.01% move from the prior day.

  • Are Investors Undervaluing General Mills, Inc. (NYSE:GIS) By 31%?
    Simply Wall St.

    Are Investors Undervaluing General Mills, Inc. (NYSE:GIS) By 31%?

    How far off is General Mills, Inc. (NYSE:GIS) from its intrinsic value? Using the most recent financial data, we'll...

  • Beyond Meat breakfast sandwiches steamroll into 9,000 Dunkin' stores
    Yahoo Finance

    Beyond Meat breakfast sandwiches steamroll into 9,000 Dunkin' stores

    Beyond Meat strengthens its relationship with Dunkin'.

  • Coca-Cola making its biggest change since 1892 and investors love it
    Yahoo Finance

    Coca-Cola making its biggest change since 1892 and investors love it

    Coca-Cola focusing more on drinks beyond its trademark full-calories soda. And investors generally like the move.

  • Why Is General Mills (GIS) Down 2.6% Since Last Earnings Report?
    Zacks

    Why Is General Mills (GIS) Down 2.6% Since Last Earnings Report?

    General Mills (GIS) reported earnings 30 days ago. What's next for the stock? We take a look at earnings estimates for some clues.

  • Can General Mills Sustain Momentum on Pet Unit, Saving Plans?
    Zacks

    Can General Mills Sustain Momentum on Pet Unit, Saving Plans?

    General Mills' (GIS) focus on key global strategies and cost-saving plans bode well. The company's Pet segment looks strong, while the U.S. Snacks business is troubled.

  • Why frozen food sales are rocking again in America
    Yahoo Finance

    Why frozen food sales are rocking again in America

    The frozen food business continues to do wonders for the bottom line of Conagra Brands.

  • Restructuring Plans to Aid Kimberly-Clark (KMB) Q3 Earnings (Revised)
    Zacks

    Restructuring Plans to Aid Kimberly-Clark (KMB) Q3 Earnings (Revised)

    Kimberly-Clark's (KMB) third-quarter fiscal 2019 results are expected to reflect the impact of 2018 Global Restructuring Program and FORCE Program.

  • Campbell Soup (CPB) Up 42% YTD: Snacks Business a Key Driver
    Zacks

    Campbell Soup (CPB) Up 42% YTD: Snacks Business a Key Driver

    Campbell Soup (CPB) is benefiting from focus on the snacks business and other efforts. However, high costs are a concern.

  • Solid Poultry Products to Aid Sanderson Farms Amid Cost Woes
    Zacks

    Solid Poultry Products to Aid Sanderson Farms Amid Cost Woes

    Sanderson Farms' (SAFM) sturdy prices in poultry products and solid export sales bodes well. However, high freight costs and soft demand for big bird boneless meat remain concerns.

  • Smucker's Buyouts Bode Well, Baking Unit Divestiture a Concern
    Zacks

    Smucker's Buyouts Bode Well, Baking Unit Divestiture a Concern

    Smucker (SJM) gains from buyouts and partnerships. It is on track with cost-saving efforts. However, divestiture of its baking business is taking a toll on the top line.

  • Hershey (HSY) Benefiting From Acquisitions & Saving Efforts
    Zacks

    Hershey (HSY) Benefiting From Acquisitions & Saving Efforts

    Hershey (HSY) has been undertaking buyouts to augment portfolio and expand in the snacking category. Also, the company focuses on optimizing portfolio to increase profitability.

  • Should Income Investors Look At General Mills, Inc. (NYSE:GIS) Before Its Ex-Dividend?
    Simply Wall St.

    Should Income Investors Look At General Mills, Inc. (NYSE:GIS) Before Its Ex-Dividend?

    Readers hoping to buy General Mills, Inc. (NYSE:GIS) for its dividend will need to make their move shortly, as the...

  • When Deal Genius Fails: Hard Lessons From 3G to SoftBank
    Bloomberg

    When Deal Genius Fails: Hard Lessons From 3G to SoftBank

    (Bloomberg) -- They’re the big dogs of modern mergers and acquisitions—rapacious dealmakers that have devoured mighty corporations, bankrolled young disrupters and upended entire industries. And they’re not looking so tough anymore.Since 2014, when the latest wave of mergers and acquisitions began to build, three names have inspired fear and envy in the M&A world. In doing so, each has been totemic of a particular vogue in the capital markets:3G Capital, the Brazilian investment firm that has picked off some of America’s most famous brands and aggressively squeezed out costs and jobs Valeant Pharmaceuticals, the ill-fated Canadian company that gobbled up drugmakers, drove up prices and fueled outrage over high prescription costs And SoftBank, the big-dreaming—and big-spending—Japanese conglomerate that has backed the likes of Uber and WeWork and remains one of the most powerful forces in Silicon ValleyFrom the start, the three M&A powerhouses adopted wildly different strategies. But for any investor, the similarities deserve attention. Wall Street believed them and their many imitators to be exceptional. Turns out, they weren’t, and aren’t.(4)That’s worth remembering at a moment when the financial world is struggling to come to grips with the yawning gap between what the pros think companies are worth and what those companies actually fetch on public markets. (See WeWork’s botched initial public offering).Not long ago, 3G, co-founded by billionaire Jorge Paulo Lemann, seemed unstoppable. Lemann became a global name by cobbling together the world’s biggest beermaker, Anheuser-Busch InBev; picking up brands like Burger King and Tim Hortons; and driving the 2015 merger between Kraft and Heinz to create one of world’s largest food companies.3G has since stumbled—hard. Mixing Kraft and Heinz turned out to be a disastrous idea, and not just for those two companies.The investment firm’s usual combine-and-cut formula failed miserably at Kraft Heinz. Since Lemann teamed up with none other than Warren Buffett to do the deal, sales and profits have tanked. 3G’s dream of turning Kraft Heinz into the savior of Big Food ended when Unilever rebuffed its $143 billion takeover offer in 2017. This February, Kraft Heinz took a staggering $15.4 billion writedown. The company’s stock has plunged more than 70% from its peak, helping to drag down rivals like Kellogg, Campbell Soup and General Mills.Former management consultant Michael Pearson had a similarly radical idea at Valeant: that drugmakers like itself had no business actually making drugs.Instead, it would borrow money to acquire rivals, dramatically increase the price of their treatments and fire almost everyone. Rinse, repeat. Valeant’s ambition peaked in 2014 when it teamed up with activist investor Bill Ackman to mount an audacious $54 billion takeover offer for Allergan, the maker of Botox.The bid was spurned, but Ackman and Pearson were undimmed and, as if to prove their theory, took the company on a buying spree that included gastrointestinal drugmaker Salix ($11.1 billion) and Sprout, a developer of female libido stimulants ($1 billion). For a while investors approved, sending Valeant’s market value to $90 billion in August 2015. Then things went spectacularly wrong.Accounting irregularities, mounting debts and political angst over surging drug prices destroyed not only the Valeant dream, but those of the entire specialty pharmaceuticals industry. Among those that followed Valeant to that 2015 peak, Perrigo, Endo International, and Mallinckrodt have since lost, respectively, 74%, 96%, and 98% of their market values. For its part, Valeant is 93% lower, with a new management, board and shareholder base, and has renamed itself Bausch Health.There is no nice way to bring SoftBank into this part of the story.By almost any conceivable measure, it is having a diabolical 2019. The quixotic Masayoshi Son, a startup kingmaker of undoubted brilliance, has staked SoftBank’s billions—and its reputation—on three companies: Uber, the ride-hailing app which has lost about a third of its value, or $19 billion, since its May IPO; Slack, a messaging platform which debuted in June and is down 35% from where it ended its first trading day; and WeWork.(5)The scale of these blowups, so starkly at odds with SoftBank’s recent esteemed status, has dislocated the U.S. IPO markets as investors and would-be public companies look skeptically at one another across a widening gulf of value perception.In hindsight, the impermanence of the three dealmakers’ strategies is easy to skewer. But the success of 3G and Valeant was fueled by some of the most well-known names in finance. SoftBank, meanwhile, tapped entire nations to bankroll its ambitions of creating a future of robot-human harmony.These failures could end up restricting Son’s access to future funding, but it’s unlikely to diminish his vision for what he has said is a 300-year plan to grow the company he started 38 years ago.Nor, probably, will it dampen his enthusiasm for what he has called the gold rush of investing in nascent technology. “It’s just a money thing. It’s not important, it’s just a process. What is more important is humans’ happiness. How do we help ourselves, humans, become happier?” Son said in 2017, calling himself a “super optimist.” “There’s always a solution.”What’s more likely is the end of the burgeoning trend of taking loss-making companies public in the hope the future will come to them. Perhaps, too, some doubt will attach itself to the idea that pumping a young business with money and expecting it to succeed isn’t an idea of wheel-inventing novelty.Either way, there will be something else to worship soon enough. There always is.(1) Another area of commonality is a tolerance for bad corporate governance. In the case of Kraft Heinz and (to be very charitable) Valeant, there was sloppy accounting. For SoftBank, it was willing to put up with the various untraditional practices of Travis Kalanick and Adam Neumann.(2) I can’t add anything revelatory to the mass that has been written about SoftBank and WeWork, the fact that it valued it at $47 billion, whether or not Messrs. Son and Neumann met for 10, 30, or 60 minutes, etc. So I won’t. But it’s hard to feel not a little sad for Adam Neumann. The Disney prince/founder/ex-CEO of WeWork, who just weeks ago was gallantly riding toward his public market destiny, has been banished from the kingdom, leaving a regency of lesser mortals to seize the reins.To contact the author of this story: Ed Hammond in New York at ehammond12@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Daniel Hauck at dhauck1@bloomberg.net, David GillenBen ScentFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • General Mills Stock Up 46% YTD: Will the Rally Continue?
    Zacks

    General Mills Stock Up 46% YTD: Will the Rally Continue?

    General Mills' (GIS) key global strategies, prospects from acquisitions and cost-saving initiatives keep it going despite the weak U.S. Snacks business and soft sales in Europe & Australia.