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‘You may not know’: Warning about $5,060 QR code fine

·2-min read
There's a new warning for Australians about QR codes. <em>(Image: Getty).</em>
There's a new warning for Australians about QR codes. (Image: Getty).

Australians in South Australia have been warned to use QR codes when they enter businesses or face fines of up to $5,060 as the state cracks down on non-compliance.

The South Australian police force launched the crackdown last week, with at least two stores in Adelaide’s Burnside Village and Norwood fined for failing to encourage customers to check in.

The fines range from $1,060 for individuals to $5,060 for businesses.

“We are seeing a level of complacency regarding COVID-19 check-ins and now is not the time to stop using QR codes,” Commissioner Grant Stevens said.

“As we start to see more large scale community events and with an increase in interstate and New Zealand travel, we need to remember the risk that COVID-19 poses to our community.”

He said SA Police would be using plain-clothes police officers to monitor compliance throughout the state.

“You may not know whether our officers are observing you walk into a business and so I would encourage each and every member of the public to do the right thing and check in where you are required to.”

QR codes in centre of Victorian real estate row

The South Australian crackdown comes as Victoria also grapples with QR code restrictions requiring units, townhouses and apartment buildings to have QR codes for visitors.

The regulation applies even if residents don’t share a common driveway, like those in standalone villas.

According to 3AW, one 85-year-old woman has received a $180 bill from her body corporate to set up the QR code system at her home.

"My first reaction was it's a rort from the body corporate,” the woman’s daughter, Karen Egan, said.

"It's a freestanding townhouse, one of four – it's just like four small houses," she said.

"The only communal area they have is a driveway."

Acting Premier James Merlino was also stumped by the technicality, saying he was unsure of the rules around private residences.

He said he “wouldn’t have thought” a QR code was necessary for residential properties.

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