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Peloton is making a $495 smart camera for strength training

·Contributing Writer
·3-min read

Peloton's fitness ambitions go far beyond treadmills and stationary bikes. Its next product is the Peloton Guide, a strength-training camera system that hooks up to your TV and uses machine learning to understand your movements.

The movement tracker feature is compatible with hundreds of Peloton strength classes. The idea is to encourage users to carry out all of the exercises in a class and keep up with instructors (but it's not a big deal if you can't stick to the instructor's pace). The Self Mode will enable users to match their form against the instructor's in real-time via smart camera technology. You'll be able to select how you appear on screen, and the aim is to help you make adjustments during a class.

Peloton Guide camera system and remote.
Peloton Guide camera system and remote.

The body activity function serves as a reminder of which muscle groups you've worked out most recently. It will suggest classes that target muscles you might have overlooked lately. In addition, Peloton Guide has a voice activation mode. You can start, stop, rewind and fast forward a class. The feature will be available in the US, Canada and the UK at the outset (for what it's worth, Peloton's bikes only just got a pause button for on-demand classes).

In terms of privacy, you'll be able to put the system to sleep, slide a cover over the camera and turn off the microphone with a physical switch, though the company says the microphone won't be on or listening unless you're in a class. Peloton plans to improve the system over time by training the machine learning model on more movements and disciplines, and increasing the number of classes and training programs. Meanwhile, you'll be able to use your own equipment and weights.

A TV displaying a selection of Peloton Guide's strength training classes.
A TV displaying a selection of Peloton Guide's strength training classes.

The company says that strength is its platform's fastest-growing discipline. The Peloton App offers some strength classes, while unofficial groups and tags focused on strength now boast nearly 250,000 community members.

Peloton Guide is the company's least expensive device to date. It costs $495 US / $645 CAD / £450 / €495. The system, which comes with a remote and the updated Peloton Heart Rate Band, will arrive in the US and Canada in early 2022. It will hit the UK, Australia and Germany later next year.

The Heart Rate Band, which will be an armband rather than the current chest strap, will be available separately early next year for $89, and is compatible with Peloton's other products. Peloton says it will discontinue the existing Heart Rate Monitor in the coming months.

It's worth noting that, as with Peloton's other products, you'll need a subscription to use it. The Peloton Guide Membership costs $13 USD / $17 CAD / £13 / €13 per month, and allows five people to work out with the system. A membership is included with Peloton's All-Access subscription (which many Bike and Tread owners will already have).

Peloton Guide is not going to be for everyone. Some people won't be comfortable seeing themselves on a screen as they're working out. But for those who do strength training at home and aren't sure that their form is right, it could fit the bill.

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