Australia markets close in 3 hours 7 minutes
  • ALL ORDS

    7,618.90
    +55.80 (+0.74%)
     
  • ASX 200

    7,323.30
    +49.50 (+0.68%)
     
  • AUD/USD

    0.7252
    +0.0019 (+0.26%)
     
  • OIL

    70.51
    -0.05 (-0.07%)
     
  • GOLD

    1,778.70
    +0.50 (+0.03%)
     
  • BTC-AUD

    58,075.55
    -1,393.60 (-2.34%)
     
  • CMC Crypto 200

    1,041.80
    -22.04 (-2.07%)
     
  • AUD/EUR

    0.6183
    +0.0020 (+0.33%)
     
  • AUD/NZD

    1.0331
    +0.0013 (+0.13%)
     
  • NZX 50

    13,213.04
    +36.10 (+0.27%)
     
  • NASDAQ

    15,027.77
    +15.58 (+0.10%)
     
  • FTSE

    6,980.98
    +77.07 (+1.12%)
     
  • Dow Jones

    33,919.84
    -50.63 (-0.15%)
     
  • DAX

    15,348.53
    +216.47 (+1.43%)
     
  • Hang Seng

    24,221.54
    +122.40 (+0.51%)
     
  • NIKKEI 225

    29,665.42
    -174.29 (-0.58%)
     

Nissan is testing a more efficient way to recycle rare-earth metals from EV motors

·Contributing Writer
·1-min read

Working since 2017 with Tokyo’s Waseda University, Nissan says it has developed and recently started testing a new recycling process that represents a more efficient and cost-effective way of recovering rare-earth metals from electric motors.

The process itself involves heating a used motor to 1,400 degrees Celsius (approximately 2,552 degrees Fahrenheit) so that it melts down. The company then adds an iron oxide to the mixture to oxidize the rare-earth metals, followed by a borate-based flux. The latter substance causes the molten mixture to separate into two liquid layers, with the rare-earth metals floating to the top of the mixture where they can be easily removed.

In testing, Nissan claims it’s been able to recover 98 percent of a motor’s rare-earth elements using the new recycling process. The entire procedure also takes about half as much time as manually disassembling a motor, which is what Nissan currently does to recycle rare-earth metals. The company hopes to implement the process by the mid-2020s.

Nissan infographic
Nissan infographic

If we’re to have any chance to address the climate crisis, finding new and novel ways to recycle and reuse rare-earth metals will be vital. The 17 minerals that make up the rare-earth group are critical to making electric vehicles, solar panels and wind turbines. A 2018 study by the Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure found a shortage of rare-earth metals is likely to limit the world’s ability to meet the emission reduction targets set out by the Paris climate agreement.

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting