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'Red flag': 12 million Aussies' targeted by Netflix, Papyal scam

Anastasia Santoreneos
·2-min read
MailGuard has intercepted a malicious email purporting to be from Netflix. Source: Getty/MailGuard
MailGuard has intercepted a malicious email purporting to be from Netflix. Source: Getty/MailGuard

Aussies have been warned about a Netflix scam doing the rounds, after cyber security firm MailGuard intercepted a malicious email from a hacker purporting to be from the streaming service.

MailGuard said the phishing emails used a display name of ‘Netflix Membership’, and were titled ‘We recently detected an issue with the billing information associated with your Account’.

With 11.9 million Aussies using Netflix, cybercriminals have taken advantage of the popular streaming service’s name in order to trick users into spilling their bank details.

The email uses a Netflix logo, and prompts readers to ‘update their details’ via a button at the end of the email.

Recipients who click on the button are then led to another page that looks extremely similar to the Netflix login page, and users are asked to enter their email address and password.

“Once users ‘sign in’ to their accounts, their credentials are harvested and they are led to the following page asking them to choose their method of payment,” the blog states.

Users are led to another page where they are prompted to put their PayPal or bank details in.

“These are also phishing pages that are designed to harvest users' confidential banking information.”

What do I do if I receive a scam email?

In general, the cybersecurity firm says you should never open emails that are not addressed to you by name, or appear to be from a legitimate company but use poor English or omit personal details.

If you’re not expecting to hear from that company, chances are it’s a scam email. And, if any links take you to landing pages that don’t have that company’s real URL, it’s also likely to be a scam.

“If the text or email links to a URL that you don't recognise, don't tap or click it. If you did already, do not enter any information on the website that opened.”

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