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NAB customer reveals 7 words scammer utters in final moments as ploy caught on film: 'I knew'

The scammer ended the call by saying: “OK, f*** yourself, love you, bye bye".

A NAB customer has captured the exact moment an Aussie caught out a scammer who was impersonating his bank, dodging a potentially devestating financial hit.

New South Wales customer Ray received a no-caller ID phone call from a person claiming to work for NAB last week, the bank told Yahoo Finance.

The man knew Ray’s personal details and told him there had been an attempted transaction on his account from New Zealand. He also claimed to have sent him a text message from NAB. That was a lie, but this time the scammer was caught on tape.

NAB scam phone call
An Aussie has caught out a scammer posing as a NAB bank employee. (Source: AAP/Supplied)

Have you fallen victim to a scam? Contact tamika.seeto@yahooinc.com

In the recording, the scammer tried to convince Ray to click a link in the text message and said that one feat was needed to achieve “two-factor authentication”.

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Ray, sensing something wasn’t right, told the scammer he did not want to open the text message until he got confirmation from NAB. This was the correct instinct.

The scammer got irritated and claimed it was "impossible” to send him text messages if he didn’t work for NAB.

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Ray continued to refuse and said: “No, mate, I’m not going to do it until I speak to somebody from NAB that I actually call.”

The scammer got irritated and said he would try to stop the “unauthorised payment”, adding Ray would be liable if he could not stop it.

Ray agreed, leading the scammer to abruptly end the call by saying: “OK, f*** yourself, love you, bye bye.”

‘Knew this guy was a scammer’

Ray’s partner Kathleen was actually the one flagged the phone call could be a scam, leading Ray to put the call on speaker and have the end of the conversation recorded.

“He said everything you expect NAB would say but he called me off a private number. He had an excuse for that. He had an excuse for everything,” Ray said.

But when Ray refused to open the text message, it became clear he was being targeted.

“When he started getting irritated, I knew this guy was a scammer,” Ray said.

Red flags to watch out for

NAB’s executive for group investigations Chris Sheehan said Ray did the right thing by not handing over his information.

“NAB will never call you and ask you to share your one-time PIN, transfer money to another account to keep it safe, give us remote access to your devices or provide personal information like your driver’s licence details,” Sheehan said.

“Criminals are masters at being insistent and pushy to create a sense of fear or urgency. Their goal is to pressure the person to make the payment themselves or share personal details, such as log in details or one-time passcodes.

“If you aren’t sure if it is NAB calling you, hang up and call the bank yourself using the number on the back of your card or via searching it on our public website.”

Red flags of a bank impersonation scam include:

  • Unexpected contact - getting a call, email or text message from someone claiming to work for a well-known business out of the blue

  • Urgency and action - getting asked to do something quickly like share a code or transfer money

  • Knowing personal information - the person may know your name or other personal details, but this could have been obtained by fraud

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