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Introducing Doriemus (ASX:DOR), The Stock That Dropped 50% In The Last Year

Simply Wall St
·4-min read

It's easy to match the overall market return by buying an index fund. When you buy individual stocks, you can make higher profits, but you also face the risk of under-performance. Unfortunately the Doriemus Plc (ASX:DOR) share price slid 50% over twelve months. That contrasts poorly with the market decline of 9.5%. Doriemus hasn't been listed for long, so although we're wary of recent listings that perform poorly, it may still prove itself with time. Shareholders have had an even rougher run lately, with the share price down 23% in the last 90 days. However, one could argue that the price has been influenced by the general market, which is down 22% in the same timeframe.

Check out our latest analysis for Doriemus

We don't think Doriemus's revenue of UK£10,000 is enough to establish significant demand. We can't help wondering why it's publicly listed so early in its journey. Are venture capitalists not interested? So it seems that the investors focused more on what could be, than paying attention to the current revenues (or lack thereof). For example, they may be hoping that Doriemus finds fossil fuels with an exploration program, before it runs out of money.

Companies that lack both meaningful revenue and profits are usually considered high risk. There was already a significant chance that they would need more money for business development, and indeed they recently put themselves at the mercy of capital markets and raised equity. So the share price itself impacts the value of the shares (as it determines the cost of capital). While some such companies go on to make revenue, profits, and generate value, others get hyped up by hopeful naifs before eventually going bankrupt.

When it last reported, Doriemus had minimal cash in excess of all liabilities. So it's prudent that the management team has already moved to replenish reserves through the recent capital raising event. With that in mind, you can imagine there may be other factors that caused the share price to drop 50% in the last year. The image below shows how Doriemus's balance sheet has changed over time; if you want to see the precise values, simply click on the image.

ASX:DOR Historical Debt May 1st 2020
ASX:DOR Historical Debt May 1st 2020

In reality it's hard to have much certainty when valuing a business that has neither revenue or profit. Would it bother you if insiders were selling the stock? I'd like that just about as much as I like to drink milk and fruit juice mixed together. You can click here to see if there are insiders selling.

A Different Perspective

We doubt Doriemus shareholders are happy with the loss of 50% over twelve months. That falls short of the market, which lost 9.5%. There's no doubt that's a disappointment, but the stock may well have fared better in a stronger market. With the stock down 23% over the last three months, the market doesn't seem to believe that the company has solved all its problems. Basically, most investors should be wary of buying into a poor-performing stock, unless the business itself has clearly improved. I find it very interesting to look at share price over the long term as a proxy for business performance. But to truly gain insight, we need to consider other information, too. Case in point: We've spotted 6 warning signs for Doriemus you should be aware of, and 3 of them make us uncomfortable.

We will like Doriemus better if we see some big insider buys. While we wait, check out this free list of growing companies with considerable, recent, insider buying.

Please note, the market returns quoted in this article reflect the market weighted average returns of stocks that currently trade on AU exchanges.

If you spot an error that warrants correction, please contact the editor at editorial-team@simplywallst.com. This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned.

We aim to bring you long-term focused research analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material. Thank you for reading.