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Husband refuses to cook Thanksgiving dinner the way his wife wants it: ‘Learn to compromise’

A husband doesn’t want to make Thanksgiving dinner to his wife’s liking.

He shared their issue on Reddit’s “Am I the A******? (AITA)” forum. They’re hosting a family dinner this year. He plans on doing the bulk of the cooking, including making a rib roast. He wants to make it medium rare.

The issue is she and her parents prefer medium well or well done. She told him they don’t like it “bloody.” He thinks it’s a waste to cook it their way because they can always just microwave their piece or eat the crispier end slices.

“This is one (expensive) piece of meat, and I don’t want to ruin all of it when the solution is clear: you can always cook a piece more,” he wrote.

Redditors shared their thoughts on the husband’s dilemma.

“Just cut the raw roast in half, and take one out sooner. My friend, learn to compromise and meet your partner halfway,” someone wrote.

“You’re the host. Your literal job is to cater to your guests,” a user added.

“You’ve got it spot on. Let her and her family pop it in the microwave,” another added.

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The post Husband refuses to cook Thanksgiving dinner the way his wife wants it: ‘Learn to compromise’ appeared first on In The Know.

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