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Coles shopper's $72 outrage: 'Make it make sense'

The customer was horrified at how little her money got her at the supermarket and said she now avoids shopping at both Coles and Woolworths.

Alondra Gataé (left) her Coles receipt (centre) and the items she bought (right).
An Aussie shopper has shared her disgust at how little she was able to buy for just a fraction at Coles for more than $72. Source: TikTok

A Coles shopper has revealed the stark difference between how much further your money can go if you shop at Aldi. Alondra Gataé was shocked that she could only get eight items for $72 from Coles.

The Melbourne woman picked up just eight items from Coles including cottage cheese, deodorant, protein pizza slices, a shower glove, frozen dessert sticks, two cartons of free-range eggs, and an avocado. But from Aldi, she got an entire trolley full of goods for about $100 more.

"I just feel ripped off shopping at Coles and Woolies when it's a shock how far $100 can get you, which isn't far at all," the 40-year-old told Yahoo Finance.

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"Someone make it make sense ... how an extra hundred dollars, is the equivalent to food for two weeks from Aldi versus eight items ... from Coles."

Do you have a story to tell? Contact yahoo.finance.au@yahooinc.com

But when contacted by Yahoo Finance, a Coles spokesperson was quick to point out that it is not clear whether the customer is "comparing like-for-like products".

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"Coles offers a wide range of product choices for our customers, including affordable own brand essentials, premium selections, and a range of popular brands," the spokesperson said.

However, Aldi was recently proven to be 25 per cent cheaper than the nation's two leading supermarkets in a survey by consumer group CHOICE. Mystery shoppers were sent to 81 supermarkets to compare prices and Aldi was the "clear leader on value for money" with a $51.51 basket.

Woolworths only slightly edged out Coles with 14 everyday grocery items coming to $68.58 and $69.33, respectively.

The Aussie shopper was horrified at the difference in price between a basket at Coles and full trolley at Aldi. Source: TikTok/alondra_g23_
The Aussie shopper was horrified at the difference in price between a basket at Coles and full trolley at Aldi. Source: TikTok/alondra_g23_ (TikTok/alondra_g23_)

While Coles and Woolworths continue to face criticism over skyrocketing prices, they've come out swinging against accusations they're taking advantage of customers.

In a submission to the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, Woolworths said it only takes in $3.60 for every $100 of revenue and if it dropped prices any further, it wouldn’t make any profit at all, while customers would only save $5 a week, according to a report from CHOICE.

While Coles said its net profits are just $2.57 for every $100 it brings in.

Both blame external factors for surging prices, with Coles pointing to “concurrent and unprecedented cost drivers and supply shocks” including commodities, shipping, oil and fertiliser, as well as the effects of war and natural disasters.

An aisle in Coles with workers.
Coles blamed “a series of concurrent and unprecedented cost drivers and supply shocks" for its increase in prices. Source: Getty Images (Getty Images)

With Aussies struggling to make ends meet, economist Stephen Koukoulas told Yahoo Finance he understands why customers blame Coles and Woolworths.

“They're an easy target, because we all go to the supermarket every week,” he said.

“But when they’re paying a higher price for opening the doors of their supermarket every morning, passing on some of the price increases is largely a fair and reasonable thing to do.”

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