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130 people just paid $800 to go nowhere

Lucy Dean
·1-min read
Commercial aircraft cabin with rows of seats down the aisle. morning light in the salon of the airliner. economy class
Would you be interested in this flight? Image: Getty

More than 130 Australians have bought a ticket to nowhere, with Qantas’ “Great Southern Land” joy flight now one of its fastest-selling flights ever.

The joy flight, which takes passengers by Uluru, the Great Barrier Reef, Kata Tjuta and the Whitsundays among other iconic Australian destinations, sold out within minutes after going on sale at 12pm AEST on Thursday.

“Miss taking to the skies together? Us too! We’ve designed a special scenic joy flight on board our 787 Dreamliner for those who just want to spread their wings – no passport or quarantine required,” the advertisement read.

The flight, on the B787 Dreamliner, features the biggest windows on any passenger aircraft with the seven-hour journey also promising “a few surprises along the way”.

Economy tickets began at $787 each, with six Australians picking up business class seats for a huge $3,787.

"We knew this flight would be popular, but we didn't expect it to sell out in 10 minutes," a Qantas spokesperson said.

"It's probably the fastest selling flight in Qantas history.

"People clearly miss travel and the experience of flying."

It comes as airlines increasingly push for interstate borders to open.

In a statement posted on Facebook, Qantas said borders need to reopen to support regional communities, local businesses and the larger tourism industry.

“The health response to this crisis is our most important priority. And like many Australians, we believe a shared framework should determine when our borders open,” Qantas said.