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$305 vs $19: Aussie passports a rip off

How does Australia's passport compare to the rest of the world? (Source: Getty)
How does Australia's passport compare to the rest of the world? (Source: Getty)

Aussie passports have been ranked the sixth-worst in the world when it comes to value for money.

An Aussie passport is valid for 10 years and will set you back $308, compared to just $19 for a passport in the United Arab Emirates., compared to just $19 for a passport in the United Arab Emirates.

Other cheap passports include the Swedish and South Korean passports, which both cost around $61.

When it comes to bang for your buck, the upfront cost of the passport is not the only metric that matters.

New research ParkSleepFly also took into account how easily travellers are able to flit between countries on their passports. For example, the ability to enter a country without a visa went towards a higher passport ranking.

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Australia’s overall mobility score wasn’t too bad, with Australians able to enter 103 countries without a visa.

The French paid the most for their passports, with the all-important travel document costing around $439.

The Liechtenstein passport took the prize as the worst value for money at $368.44, followed by Mexico, San Marino, Canada and Chile.

The bargain United Arab Emirates passport was ranked the best value for money, followed by passports from Sweden and South Korea.

If you are looking to travel, go now

As Covid travel restrictions have lifted, airlines have tried to tempt people back into travel with cheap flights.

However, University of Technology Sydney senior tourism lecturer David Beirman said rising fuel prices, largely driven by the conflict in Ukraine, would add to mounting pressure on airlines to hike ticket prices.

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