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This 1969 Holden Monaro sold for $750,000 at auction, setting a new record. Take a look inside.

Sharon Masige
  • A 1969 Holden Monaro set a new record, scoring the highest ever price for an Australian Holden at auction.
  • The HT Monaro 57D sold for $750,000 to a bidder who wished to remain anonymous.
  • It was the first factory-made vehicle for the Holden Dealer Team.
  • Visit Business Insider Australia’s homepage for more stories.

The 1969 Holden HT Monaro 57D race car was sold at auction for $750,000 over the weekend, setting a new record.

It scored the highest price for a road registered Australian Holden ever sold at auction, with several bidders vying to snap it up.

This Monaro has a special place in history as it was the first factory-made race car for the Holden Dealer Team. It was sold from Lloyds Auctions, with the auction live-streamed and bidders able to bid online or over the phone.

The day before the auction, however, the Australian Government contacted Lloyds, letting them know that the car could possibly be declared as an Australian protected item – basically a heritage product – meaning it could face an export ban if it was purchased by an international bidder.

In the end, the winning bidder – who wanted to remain anonymous – will be keeping the vehicle on home soil.

"There were seven bidders on the Holden Monaro which came down to two Australian enthusiasts who fought it out, both with the intention to keep the car within Australia," Lee Hames, Lloyds Auctions Chief Operations Officer said in a statement.

Holden made headlines around the country in February after General Motors announced it would end sales of the brand from 2021.

Here's a closer look at the 1969 Holden HT Monaro 57D:

The 1969 Holden HT Monaro 57D is a cashmere white, 2-door coupe.

It's a rear wheel drive, and the odometer sits at 24,875 miles (40032 kilometres).

The 1969 Monaro was the first factory made race car for the Holden Dealer Team. It was built for race car drivers Kevin Bartlett and Spencer Martin.

The car was entered in the Sandown 300 race in 1969 but didn't finish after a brake failure caused it to crash. It was this crash that helped the team figure out what needed to be fixed for future races.

F1 World Champion Alan Jones said in a company video this vehicle was "probably the rarest out of all of the Monaros that were built at the time, and the one that started off the Holden Dealer Team and Holden's brilliant record of Bathurst and other races across Australia."

READ MORE:

Holden is no more: General Motors announces the 164-year-old Aussie auto brand will be axed by the end of the year 9 iconic Holden vehicles throughout history The history of Holden in 22 photos – from an Adelaide saddlery, to Australia's best-selling car, to its untimely demise