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185,000 Centrelink recipients see payments double

·Personal Finance Editor
·2-min read
Australian currency fanned out and Australians lining up outside at a Centrelink office.
Centrelink recipients in South Australia will get an additional cash boost. (Source: Getty)

Thousands of Centrelink recipients in South Australia have started to see additional cost-of-living payments come into their bank accounts.

SA Social Services Minister Natalie Cook said the payments had started making their way into eligible recipients’ accounts.

The Cost of Living Concession payment was announced as part of the state government's Budget.

Those eligible for the concession will receive up to $449 in the next financial year - an increase of up to $231.80 on the current payment.

The increase was more than 100 per cent because the government was doubling the amount after indexation, Premier Peter Malinauskas said when he announced the cash boost in June.

The Cost of Living Concession can only be paid to one person per household. There are currently approximately 185,000 recipients.

The assessments were based on an individual’s circumstances on July 1 of the relevant financial year.

“The rising cost of living is hitting everybody’s budgets, but it is disproportionately hurting those on low and fixed incomes,” Malinauskas said.

“While the government can’t click its fingers and make the cost of everyday items cheaper, what we can do is provide targeted relief to those who need it most.”

Malinauskas said many South Australians were having to cut back their household budget to meet rising costs.

“Doubling the Cost of Living Concession will provide additional relief to people on low and fixed incomes to give them that little bit of extra breathing space,” he said.

The boost was a one-time payment for the 2022/23 financial year and cost the government $39.3 million.

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