Advertisement
Australia markets open in 2 minutes
  • ALL ORDS

    8,118.30
    -1.90 (-0.02%)
     
  • AUD/USD

    0.6621
    -0.0000 (-0.01%)
     
  • ASX 200

    7,848.10
    -3.60 (-0.05%)
     
  • OIL

    77.14
    -0.43 (-0.55%)
     
  • GOLD

    2,383.60
    -9.30 (-0.39%)
     
  • Bitcoin AUD

    104,484.02
    -1,527.24 (-1.44%)
     
  • CMC Crypto 200

    1,503.57
    -22.85 (-1.50%)
     

Woolworths says 'price dropped' - but viral photo reveals otherwise: 'Aren't discounts'

Shoppers have been urged to check one thing if they want to know if an item is truly discounted

A picture snapped in the aisles at Woolworths has revealed the price of a bag of Cadbury Easter eggs are higher this year but the very same product is advertised with a "prices dropped" tag.

Both Coles and Woolworths are under the microscope for alleged deceptive price practices, with consumer advocacy group Choice finding 83 per cent of Australian shoppers didn't know if they were getting a good deal due to "confusing promotional practices in store".

For example, a 440g bag of Cadbury chocolate eggs was worth $11 last year and is now listed for $12. That's a dollar extra, but as the prices were recently $13.50

“Supermarkets use a range of these potentially misleading tactics, specials that aren't actually specials, discounts that aren't discounts … but actually, we don't know what those mean - the average consumer doesn't know what they mean," senior campaigns and policy adviser Bea Sherwood told Yahoo Finance.

Easter eggs on sale next to the same eggs being listed online
Woolworths has added a 'prices dropped' tag even though they were cheaper last year. (Source: Reddit/Woolworths)

Do you have a story? Email me at stew.perrie@yahooinc.com

“The best way to know if something is actually discounted or just if it's discounted compared to other items is to check the unit price. And that is the best way to establish if you know you're getting a discount.”

ADVERTISEMENT

RELATED:

‘Inflation is officially out of control’

Easter is fast approaching and shoppers have been quick to point out the "outrageous" price of some products, namely a bunny being sold for $10 in Coles. That’s $4 per 100 grams.

“$40 a kilo for B-grade chocolate. Scam,” one person said.

Another added: “Geez, I remember when you could buy Easter eggs for less than $5!! Also remember getting a really nice mint one from the local market, which was so good and only cost about $2!! and it was a decent size too.”

A third wrote: “Inflation is officially out of control.”

“I remember when these were only $1. I'm struggling as it is, imagine if you're a family on a single income,” commented a fourth.

Since then, the item has been put on special, dropping to $7. That's $2.80 per 100g.

A Coles spokesperson told Yahoo Finance the price cut had nothing to do with the viral X post and had been planned for a while.

Woolworths has also lowered the price of the same bunny this week, from $10 to $8.

Cadbury told Yahoo Finance: “The shape, size and pricing of our Cadbury Dairy Milk range vary depending on the eat experience and product type. Cadbury can confirm our 250g bunny referenced in the X post has remained the same price since last year. Cadbury will continue to deliver the highest-quality and great-tasting chocolate, made in Australia, and from the best local ingredients.”

Yahoo Finance has contacted Woolworths for comment.

This isn't the first time Aussies have been shocked by Easter prices. Last year, 400g Cadbury Easter eggs were listed for $20.

Consumer and retail expert Gary Mortimer told Yahoo Australia Easter eggs had always cost more than other chocolates because their shape made them more “complex” to make. Prices are also on the rise due to general inflation.

To make matters worse, Cocoa prices have increased to an all-time high this year due to bad weather conditions in West Africa, which is home to three-quarters of the world’s production.

Follow Yahoo Finance on Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram and Twitter, and subscribe to our free daily newsletter.

Yahoo Australia