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Tesla to work with regulators on data security

Tesla cars mop up reams of data wherever they go.

They're fitted with an array of sensors and cameras.

And that's an increasing worry for watchdogs, at least in some countries.

Back in May Reuters reported that some Chinese government workers had been told not to park their Teslas inside official compounds.

That was for fear what their cameras might record.

On Friday (September 17), Tesla boss Elon Musk moved to allay concerns.

He told an electric vehicle conference in China that he would work with regulators to ensure data security.

Musk said the growth of autonomous driving technology had made car data a major public concern.

As part of moves to address Chinese worries, Tesla has established a local site to store all vehicle data generated in the country.

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