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How to fix the filibuster: Yahoo News Explains

While Democrats hold a narrow majority in both chambers of Congress, there’s still one thing standing in the way of the Biden administration achieving its legislative goals: the Senate filibuster. While the filibuster has existed in some form for most of U.S. history, in recent years it’s evolved into a tool that makes congressional gridlock not only possible but, at times, a near certainty. Now with crises on multiple fronts, there are increasing calls to do away with the filibuster altogether in order to pass meaningful legislation — but that’s easier said than done. Norman J. Ornstein, an emeritus scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, explains how we got here and several alternative ways to make the filibuster work as originally intended.