• Amazon employee on climate strike: Tech firms have 'been complicit for too long'
    Yahoo Finance

    Amazon employee on climate strike: Tech firms have 'been complicit for too long'

    Amazon and Google employees hit the streets to pressure tech giants to do more to fight climate change.

  • Nintendo's $199 Switch Lite packs plenty of power into a small package
    Yahoo Finance

    Nintendo's $199 Switch Lite packs plenty of power into a small package

    The Nintendo Switch Lite is a smaller, lighter, more portable, and less expensive version of the best-selling Switch.

  • Investing.com

    3 Things Under the Radar This Week

    Investing.com - Here are three things that fell under the radar this week.

  • WeWork, WeWait, WeWorry: What’s Next for CEO Adam Neumann?
    Bloomberg

    WeWork, WeWait, WeWorry: What’s Next for CEO Adam Neumann?

    (Bloomberg) -- Steve Schwarzman has doubts. So does Larry Ellison.And so, too, do the growing numbers of Wall Street bankers and investors who are all anxiously awaiting the next move by WeWork and its brash co-founder, Adam Neumann.Neumann was a no-show this week for a long-planned appearance at a SoftBank Group Corp. three-day retreat in Pasadena, California, according to people familiar with the the matter, a further sign that company executives are hunkering down. Once the WeWork initial public offering was postponed late Monday, organizers knew Neumann’s presence would be iffy, the people said. His planned appearance was rescheduled from the first day of the event at the Langham hotel to the last and then canceled altogether.In short order Neumann’s office-sharing company has gone from a get-rich story to a you’ve-got-to-be-joking melodrama -- from WeWork to WeWait to, now, WeWorry.It was a brutal week. First, WeWork’s parent company, We Co., finally conceded that its grandiose plans for going public would have to wait.Then Schwarzman, one of the most powerful figures on Wall Street, threw shade on the company’s hoped-for valuation, which has already collapsed from upwards of $60 billion to $15 billion -- or lower.“I sort of went, what? How do you get this?” Schwarzman, the head of private equity giant Blackstone Group Inc., said of the early numbers Wednesday at a luncheon in New York. Ellison, chairman of Oracle Corp., went further, according to Barron’s. He told a group of entrepreneurs at his San Francisco home that day that WeWork is “almost worthless.”And it only gets worse. In London, two deals for major office buildings that are largely leased out to WeWork started to fray. Back in its hometown of New York, the company made a small round of job cuts. And the Wall Street Journal, examining WeWork’s over-the-top culture, reported that Neumann and his friends smoked marijuana on a private jet en route to Israel last summer -- and left a chunk of the drug behind, spurring the plane’s owner to summon it back.If all that weren’t enough, Neumann’s own bankers were getting antsy: They were looking to revise a $500 million credit line secured by WeWork stock -- an acknowledgment that those shares appear far less solid than they used to.New RisksAnd, by Friday, Wendy Silverstein, a big name in New York commercial real estate who joined WeWork last year as head of its property investment arm, had left the company. She’s spending time caring for her elderly parents.Even the president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston was adding to the angst. In a speech Friday in New York, Eric Rosengren warned that the proliferation of co-working spaces might pose new risks to financial stability.A WeWork representative declined to comment on Neumann’s canceled appearance at the SoftBank conference, citing the pre-IPO quiet period. SoftBank also declined to comment.Rarely has so much gone so wrong so fast for a young company in the spotlight. Neumann has begrudgingly agreed to cede some of his powers. The question now: Will that be enough?“I’ve never seen a company of this size and scale generate such a consensus of negative opinion in my long, long life of following IPOs,” said Len Sherman, a Columbia Business School adjunct professor whose 30-year business career included time as a senior partner at consulting firm Accenture Plc. “There is no box that they haven’t ticked when you think of all the reasons that you might be very concerned -- like blaring red lights. Like, oh my gosh, caution, danger, danger.”WeWork now hopes to go public next month. But even that may be optimistic. Neumann, also We Co.’s chief executive officer, has to persuade investors that his company -- which has raised more than $12 billion since its founding and never turned a nickel of profit -- is worth billions on the stock market.Deadline LoomsTime is short. WeWork must complete its IPO before the end of the year to keep access to a crucial $6 billion loan.The company’s $669 million of bonds due in 2025 have dropped 5 cents this week to 97.75 cents on the dollar as of Thursday, according to the Trace bond-price reporting system.A few hours after the Journal story hit Wednesday, investors at a Goldman Sachs Group Inc. conference in New York heard from Snap Inc.’s Evan Spiegel -- Neumann’s predecessor as a celebrated startup founder whose behavior and company control attracted unflattering attention as the unicorn went public in 2017.He was asked what advice he’d give to founders looking to become CEOs of companies that have to answer to shareholders. His answer:“Don’t go public.”(Updates with CEO’s canceled appearance in third paragraph.)\--With assistance from Gillian Tan, Matthew Boesler and Sarah McBride.To contact the reporters on this story: Ellen Huet in San Francisco at ehuet4@bloomberg.net;Scott Deveau in New York at sdeveau2@bloomberg.net;Gwen Everett in New York at geverett10@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Michael J. Moore at mmoore55@bloomberg.net, David Gillen, Daniel TaubFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • 3 Dividend-Paying Tech Stocks for Income Investors to Buy Right Now
    Zacks

    3 Dividend-Paying Tech Stocks for Income Investors to Buy Right Now

    We searched for strong tech companies that also pay a dividend, utilizing our Zacks Stock Screener. These three tech stocks should remain attractive to investors even during a potential market downturn...

  • FX Empire

    AUD/USD and NZD/USD Fundamental Daily Forecast – Weaken as Traders Prepare for Additional Rate Cuts

    After surprising traders with a 50 basis point rate cut in August, many traders thought the RBNZ would pass on a September 24 rate cut and trim on November 12 instead. However, this week’s price action indicates that traders aren’t taking any chances with another surprise and have already begun to price in a rate cut for next week.

  • AMD’s New EPYC 7H12 CPU Offers Higher Clock Speed
    Market Realist

    AMD’s New EPYC 7H12 CPU Offers Higher Clock Speed

    This week, at its European launch of EPYC Rome in Rome, Italy, AMD announced the addition of a new CPU to the Rome family: the EPYC 7H12 processor.

  • FX Empire

    AUD/USD Weekly Price Forecast – Australian dollar breaks down for the week

    The Australian dollar initially tried to rally during the week, but then broke down significantly as we continue to see a lot of concerns when it comes to the US/China trade situation and of course global growth in general which Australia is highly sensitive to.

  • Square Stock: Jim Cramer Says It’s Worth Buying
    Market Realist

    Square Stock: Jim Cramer Says It’s Worth Buying

    Jim Cramer thinks that Square stock is worth owning. The stock has upside potential. According to Cramer, investors should buy the stock when it falls.

  • FX Empire

    AUD/USD Price Forecast – Aussie dollar continues to struggle

    The Australian dollar initially tried to rally during the trading session on Friday, but then struggled above the 0.68 level. By doing so, the market turned right back around to form a very bearish looking candle stick.

  • Investing.com

    Stocks – S&P Falls on Trade Jitters, Tech Weakness

    Investing.com - Stocks fell back Friday as Wall Street worried that U.S.-China trade talks had hit a snag.

  • 6 Tech ETFs With Maximum Exposure to Microsoft
    Zacks

    6 Tech ETFs With Maximum Exposure to Microsoft

    Investors seeking to bet on this software leader could definitely try out ETFs.

  • Amgen, Walt Disney, Microsoft, Apple and Oracle highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day
    Zacks

    Amgen, Walt Disney, Microsoft, Apple and Oracle highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day

    Amgen, Walt Disney, Microsoft, Apple and Oracle highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day

  • Amazon Orders Electric Trucks, Pushes for Carbon Neutrality
    Zacks

    Amazon Orders Electric Trucks, Pushes for Carbon Neutrality

    Amazon (AMZN) places purchase order for 100,000 electric delivery trucks with Rivian.

  • Amazon Boosts Reach in India with Alexa in Hindi & Hinglish
    Zacks

    Amazon Boosts Reach in India with Alexa in Hindi & Hinglish

    Amazon (AMZN) to strengthen presence in virtual assistant market of India with the latest Hindi and Hinglish support on Alexa.

  • Stock Market News For Sep 20, 2019
    Zacks

    Stock Market News For Sep 20, 2019

    Benchmarks mostly closed in the green on Thursday on upbeat U.S. housing market as well as gains in Microsoft.

  • Company News For Sep 20, 2019
    Zacks

    Company News For Sep 20, 2019

    Companies in the news are: TGT, WWR, EROS, OSTK

  • Zacks

    Autonomous Driving Space Gains Steam: Stocks in Focus

    Here we discuss few stocks well poised to capitalize on their ongoing initiatives in self-driving space.

  • AMD Takes the Zen Family Tradition Forward
    Market Realist

    AMD Takes the Zen Family Tradition Forward

    Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) stock has risen significantly since 2017, when the company first introduced its high-performance Zen architecture.

  • Count on These 3 Video Game Stocks for Superb Gains
    Zacks

    Count on These 3 Video Game Stocks for Superb Gains

    This is an opportune moment to grab video game stocks as new releases this fall could be game changers in boosting revenues.

  • LPL Financial's (LPLA) August Brokerage Assets Improve Y/Y
    Zacks

    LPL Financial's (LPLA) August Brokerage Assets Improve Y/Y

    LPL Financial (LPLA) records 4.9% year-over-year growth in brokerage and advisory assets in August 2019. However, it declined marginally from the prior month.

  • Marvell Strengthens Ethernet Portfolio With Aquantia Buyout
    Zacks

    Marvell Strengthens Ethernet Portfolio With Aquantia Buyout

    The combination of Marvell's (MRVL) gigabit PHY and secure switch products, and Aquantia's Multi-gig automotive PHYs is expected to create an advanced range of high-speed in-car networking solutions.

  • Traders Who Can’t Code May Become Extinct, Goldman’s Tech Pioneer Warns
    Bloomberg

    Traders Who Can’t Code May Become Extinct, Goldman’s Tech Pioneer Warns

    (Bloomberg) -- Just how important will the ability to write computer code be to a successful career on Wall Street?According to R. Martin Chavez, an architect of Goldman Sachs Group Inc.’s effort to transform itself with technology, “It’s like writing an English sentence.”As Chavez prepares to leave the company, the onetime commodities staffer who rose to posts overseeing technology and ultimately trading is reflecting on his “26-year adventure” in the industry. “The short, short description of it is making money, capital and risk programmable,” he said in a Bloomberg Television interview to be broadcast Friday. “There are certainly many kinds of manual activities that computers are just better at.”Chavez, 55, outlined strengths that can help humans stay relevant, such as their relationship skills and ability to assess risks. Yet he predicted that longstanding career dichotomies on Wall Street, like trader versus engineer, will go away. To keep working, people will need both of those skills. Even money is going digital, a shift that goes far beyond cryptocurrencies, he said, pointing to the success of Stripe Inc. as an example of creating new ways to move funds.Stripe, for its part, has become one of the most valuable companies in Silicon Valley.Mom’s AdviceOnce Chavez leaves the bank at the end of the year, he plans to focus on “programmable money” and spend time thinking about and investing in “programmable life.”In many ways, his career to date illustrates Wall Street’s own evolution. He was early in combining traditional banking activities and engineering, honing skills in the 1990s that companies are now vying to bring into their top ranks.He was also openly gay at Goldman Sachs at a time when it was virtually unheard of. And he’s Latino, a group particularly underrepresented across Wall Street’s leadership.His mother used to tell him that he would have to work twice as hard to be successful -- which he called “excellent, excellent advice.” Ironically, something that helped him in his career, he said, was being able to speak Spanish in his job.His mom also coached him not to get wound up by what other people say. He said the lesson he took from one of her mantras, “Que digan misa,” was that “I’m just going to do what I know is right, I’m going to do my thing, and trust that it’s going to work out.”To contact the reporter on this story: Sonali Basak in New York at sbasak7@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Michael J. Moore at mmoore55@bloomberg.net, David Scheer, Steve DicksonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Deutsche Completes Auction of Equity Derivatives Portfolio
    Zacks

    Deutsche Completes Auction of Equity Derivatives Portfolio

    Deutsche Bank (DB) makes progress in meeting the radical restructuring targets it had announced in July 2019 to free up capital for other productive business lines.

  • Goldman Shows Bright Future for Banks, If Not for Bankers
    Bloomberg

    Goldman Shows Bright Future for Banks, If Not for Bankers

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The continuing debate about the future of banking since the 2008 financial crisis has intensified recently on reports that banks are cutting jobs and slashing pay. While the outlook for bankers is precarious, the same can’t be said for the banks.  Goldman Sachs Group Inc. has featured prominently in the chatter about cutbacks, and not just because of its preeminence among U.S. banks. As Bloomberg News reported on Monday, Goldman’s compensation per employee plummeted 61% from 2007 to 2018 after adjusting for wage growth during the period, the largest decline among 12 big U.S. and European banks Bloomberg analyzed. Apparently, few at Goldman were spared a pay cut. Chief Executive Officer David Solomon was paid $23 million last year, a third of what former CEO Lloyd Blankfein was paid in 2007.Pay isn’t the only thing declining at Goldman. Reports also surfaced on Monday that Chief Risk Officer Robin Vince is leaving, the latest in a long line of senior departures. The Wall Street Journal reported earlier this month that up to 15% of Goldman's partners may depart in 2019, far higher turnover than normal, even as Goldman named its smallest class of partners in two decades last year.The problem, according to Odeon Capital analyst Dick Bove, is that the “Fourth Industrial Revolution” — the widespread fear that robots will replace human workers — is already encroaching on trading and investment management, two key divisions at many big banks, including Goldman. Upstart financial firms are leveraging technology to offer those and other services at a lower cost, luring clients from incumbents such as Goldman and pressuring them to lower fees.Suffice it to say, big banks can’t continue to carry an army of well-paid bankers while tech-savvy competitors undercut their fees. Goldman spent roughly $12.3 billion on compensation and benefits in 2018, more than half of its total operating expenses, and just $1 billion on communications and technology, which is typical of Wall Street banks.Meanwhile, trading revenue at the five biggest U.S. banks on Wall Street shrank 8% last quarter after declining 14% in the first. In response to its own trading slump, Citigroup Inc. is preparing to cut hundreds of trading jobs this year, and it’s almost certainly not alone. “The rest of Wall Street is thinking the same way,” Jeff Harte, an analyst at Sandler O’Neill, told Bloomberg News in July.The big banks have little choice but to deploy robots of their own. Goldman bought financial adviser United Capital earlier this year, in part to acquire its digital platform FinLife CX. That followed its acquisition of personal finance app Clarity Money last year, now part of Goldman’s online bank Marcus. Merrill Lynch, once the archetypal high-touch brokerage firm, introduced an online discount broker in 2016 and a robo-adviser soon after. JPMorgan Chase introduced similar services recently.  The move to automation is obviously bad for rank-and-file bankers, but it’s no better for their bosses because a smaller headcount requires fewer managers. So it makes sense that Goldman is culling its upper ranks. Solomon says that shrinking the number of partners is meant to restore “the aspirational nature of the partnership,” which is probably a gentle reminder that the firm no longer needs many of its nearly 500 partners.     What’s bad for bankers, however, is likely to be a boon for shareholders. Big banks are transforming into vast technology platforms overseen by a smaller core of executives and business generators. Solomon appears to acknowledge as much by aiming to keep the partner ranks weighted toward rainmakers, according to the Journal, a role that the bots can’t play. The horde of midlevel bankers will undoubtedly be thinned, too, and some of them replaced with lower-paid programmers and engineers. Automation is likely to make banks more profitable, even as fees for their services continue to decline.  The big banks also have little to fear from upstarts. Technology becomes cheaper and more widely available over time, but brand and distribution is enduring and difficult to attain. That gives Goldman and its peers a considerable edge. Remember NetBank and Bank of Internet USA? They were online banks that threatened to dethrone brick-and-mortar ones during the dot-com boom of the late 1990s. But once they demonstrated that online banking was the future, big banks rushed to offer similar services and cornered the market before the newcomers could gain traction. A similar story is unfolding with online trading, lending and money management.There are signs that the changes underway at financial firms are already paying off. Net income margin, or earnings as a percentage of revenue, for the S&P 500 Financials Index jumped to 17.5% in 2018 from an average of 12.4% from 2009 to 2017. It’s expected to climb to 18% this year, nearly matching the previous high of 18.8% in 2006. Return on capital was the highest on record in 2018 and is expected to grow again this year.The future of banking may not be bright for bankers, but it’s likely to be more lucrative for banks and their shareholders.   To contact the author of this story: Nir Kaissar at nkaissar1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Daniel Niemi at dniemi1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Nir Kaissar is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the markets. He is the founder of Unison Advisors, an asset management firm. He has worked as a lawyer at Sullivan & Cromwell and a consultant at Ernst & Young. For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.