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Recent MACD Bearish Crosses

Recent MACD Bearish Crosses

3.60k followers31 symbols Watchlist by Yahoo Finance

Follow this list to discover and track stocks that have set MACD bearish crosses within the last week. A bearish crossover occurs when the MACD turns down and crosses below the signal line. Our algorithms use 12,26,9 as MACD parameters. This list is generated daily, ranked based on market cap and limited to the top 30 stocks that meet the criteria.

31 symbols

  • China Roundup: SoftBank leads Didi's $500M round and Meituan crosses $100B valuation
    TechCrunch

    China Roundup: SoftBank leads Didi's $500M round and Meituan crosses $100B valuation

    Hello and welcome back to TechCrunch’s China Roundup, a digest of recent events shaping the Chinese tech landscape and what they mean to people in the rest of the world. Last week, we had a barrage of news ranging from SoftBank's latest bet on China's autonomous driving sector to Chinese apps making waves in the U.S. (not TikTok). TikTok isn’t the only app with a Chinese background that’s making waves in the U.S. A brand new short-video app called Zynn has been topping the iOS chart in America since May 26, just weeks after its debut.

  • NetEase Seeks Up to $2.8 Billion in Hong Kong Stock Offering
    Bloomberg

    NetEase Seeks Up to $2.8 Billion in Hong Kong Stock Offering

    (Bloomberg) -- NetEase Inc. has started taking investor orders for a listing in Hong Kong that could raise as much as $2.8 billion, which could be the world’s second-largest initial share sale this year.The company plans to sell 171 million new shares in its second listing before exercising the over-allotment option, according to terms for the deal seen by Bloomberg. The offering by the Nasdaq-listed Chinese internet company is already oversubscribed, people familiar with the matter said. It has set the maximum offer price at HK$126 ($16.25) a share, meaning it could raise as much as $2.8 billion.NetEase’s listing is set to overtake coffee giant JDE Peet’s BV’s $2.5 billion initial public offering in Europe as the second-largest initial share sale this year. Only Beijing-Shanghai High Speed Railway Co. has raised more with its $4.3 billion IPO in January, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.The offering comes as tensions between the U.S. and China are intensifying. Late last month, the Senate passed a bipartisan bill that could force major Chinese companies to stop trading their shares on U.S. exchanges. On Friday, President Donald Trump announced measures including that American financial regulators would examine Chinese firms listed on U.S. stock markets with an eye toward limiting American investment in the companies.NetEase follows Alibaba Group Holding Ltd., which raised $13 billion in a homecoming listing last year while JD.com Inc. won approval from Hong Kong Exchanges & Clearing Ltd. last week for a $2 billion offering, Bloomberg has reported.NetEase’s Hong Kong share sale represents about 5% of its total shares outstanding after the completion of the deal. The company is taking orders from institutional investors from Monday through June 4 and retail ones from June 2 to June 5, terms for the deal show.It aims to price the offering on June 5 before the U.S. market opens and to begin trading on June 11. NetEase plans to use the proceeds for global strategies and opportunities, to fund innovation and general corporate purposes.China International Capital Corporation Ltd., Credit Suisse Group AG and JPMorgan Chase and Co. are joint sponsors.A representative for NetEase declined to comment on the subscription of the offering.(Updates first, second and third paragraphs with details of share offering.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Business Wire

    Wells Fargo Utilities and High Income Fund Announces Sources of Distribution

    The Wells Fargo Utilities and High Income Fund (NYSE American: ERH) released information about the sources of today’s distribution in a Notice provided to shareholders. The full text of the Notice is available below and on the Wells Fargo Asset Management website.

  • Will protests and looting permanently damage the economy?
    Yahoo Finance

    Will protests and looting permanently damage the economy?

    Here's how investors should be thinking through the impact of social unrest sweeping the country.

  • AbbVie Gets FDA Nod for Oriahnn to Control Menstrual Bleeding
    Zacks

    AbbVie Gets FDA Nod for Oriahnn to Control Menstrual Bleeding

    The FDA approves AbbVie's (ABBV) Oriahnn oral capsule for checking heavy menstrual bleeding related to uterine fibroids in pre-menopausal women. It will be sold in US markets by June-end.

  • Like Dividends? You'll Love These 5 Stocks
    Motley Fool

    Like Dividends? You'll Love These 5 Stocks

    Picking the best dividend stocks to add to your investment portfolio requires more than looking for the highest yields. For years of dependable dividend income, you need to find well-run companies with solid business models capable of maintaining the dividend through tough economic times. The companies are listed in order of their dividend yields based on recent share prices.

  • Lilly's Cyramza Gets FDA Approval for First-Line Lung Cancer
    Zacks

    Lilly's Cyramza Gets FDA Approval for First-Line Lung Cancer

    FDA approves Lilly's (LLY) Cyramza as a combination regimen for metastatic EGFR-mutated non-small cell lung cancer. Cyramza is now approved for six indications to treat four different types of cancers.

  • Zacks.com featured highlights include: West Pharmaceutical Services, Teradyne, Dollar General, Applied Materials and Kroger
    Zacks

    Zacks.com featured highlights include: West Pharmaceutical Services, Teradyne, Dollar General, Applied Materials and Kroger

    Zacks.com featured highlights include: West Pharmaceutical Services, Teradyne, Dollar General, Applied Materials and Kroger

  • Synopsys, Acushnet, CrowdStrike, Zoom and Netflix highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day
    Zacks

    Synopsys, Acushnet, CrowdStrike, Zoom and Netflix highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day

    Synopsys, Acushnet, CrowdStrike, Zoom and Netflix highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day

  • Stock Market News for June 1, 2020
    Zacks

    Stock Market News for June 1, 2020

    Benchmarks finished mostly higher on Friday after President Donald Trump's press conference in response to China's new security legislation turned out not to be as disruptive to trade and finance as investors had earlier feared.

  • T-Mobile is First with 5G in all 50 States!
    Business Wire

    T-Mobile is First with 5G in all 50 States!

    The country’s one and only nationwide 5G network just got nationwide-r, expanding its footprint with partner coverage! T-Mobile (NASDAQ: TMUS) and GCI today announced a historic partnership, immediately allowing T-Mobile customers with 5G smartphones to tap into 5G while roaming in Anchorage, Alaska, making T-Mobile the first and only wireless provider to offer 5G coverage in all 50 states! The new partnership also gives GCI customers roaming access to T-Mobile’s nationwide 5G network, America’s largest, covering more than one million square miles and nearly 6,000 cities and towns.

  • 5 Dogs of the Dow for the Month of June
    Zacks

    5 Dogs of the Dow for the Month of June

    Dogs of the Dow have large customer base, sustainable business model, a long track of profitability and strong liquidity, which allow them to offer sizable yields regardless of market conditions.

  • Beijing Fires Back in Retaliation to the Retaliation and Yet the Dollar Slides
    FX Empire

    Beijing Fires Back in Retaliation to the Retaliation and Yet the Dollar Slides

    Economic data shows an improvement but nothing to write home about. Civil unrest, economic gloom, and unprecedented unemployment must be a concern…

  • Why Costco Could Be a Loser in the E-Commerce Boom
    Motley Fool

    Why Costco Could Be a Loser in the E-Commerce Boom

    The warehouse retailer does a lot of things well, but online retail hasn't traditionally been one of them.

  • 5 Tech Winners From First Back-to-Back Monthly Gain in 2020
    Zacks

    5 Tech Winners From First Back-to-Back Monthly Gain in 2020

    The technology sector has become the major catalyst to drive stock market's recovery.from the coronavirus-induced mayhem in March.

  • Alnylam to Webcast Conference Call Discussing Full Results from ILLUMINATE-A Phase 3 Study of Lumasiran at ERA-EDTA International Congress
    Business Wire

    Alnylam to Webcast Conference Call Discussing Full Results from ILLUMINATE-A Phase 3 Study of Lumasiran at ERA-EDTA International Congress

    Alnylam Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Nasdaq: ALNY), the leading RNAi therapeutics company, announced today that management will discuss full results from the ILLUMINATE-A Phase 3 study of lumasiran in a webcast conference call on Sunday, June 7, 2020 at 8:30 am ET. Lumasiran is an investigational RNAi therapeutic targeting hydroxyacid oxidase 1 (HAO1) – the gene encoding glycolate oxidase (GO) – in development for the treatment of primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1). The clinical data will be presented at a late-breaking session at the European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association (ERA-EDTA) International Congress being held June 6-9 as a virtual event.

  • Bloomberg

    FCC Chief Takes On the Pentagon...and DOT, and NOAA, and Energy

    (Bloomberg) -- In his quest to expand U.S. mobile broadband capacity, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai hasn’t been afraid to anger colleagues in government.He’s taken on the Pentagon, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration as well as the departments of Transportation and Energy. Those agencies have warned that his plans to reallocate spectrum could endanger national security, harm weather forecasts, loosen control of the electrical grid and degrade vehicle safety.So far, Pai has prevailed.“Pai is willing to get himself on the hot seat,” said Doug Brake, telecom policy director for the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation, a Washington-based policy group that works to accelerate innovation.The fights are worth billions of dollars as industries jockey for rights to airwaves, riding a boom in usage for such things as online shopping, streaming television and social media. Appetite for gadgets and the airwaves on which to run them is only growing: the U.S. will have 1.2 billion mobile connected devices by 2023, up from 560 million in 2018, according to a forecast by Cisco Systems Inc.Pai’s independence may be tested in coming months as President Donald Trump has ordered the FCC to draw up regulations to keep social media companies such as Twitter Inc. from censoring political speech.“This debate is an important one,” Pai said in a statement. “The Federal Communications Commission will carefully review any petition for rulemaking filed by the Department of Commerce.”Pai, whose office didn’t reply to requests for comment, has an insiders’ profile that doesn’t suggest a penchant for inter-agency skirmishing. He is a former FCC commissioner, agency staff lawyer and U.S. Senate aide, and before that an attorney for Verizon Communications Inc. President Donald Trump elevated him three years ago to chairman of the commission, which was created in 1934 to keep radio signals straight and now doing the same with wireless broadband.Pai, 47, presents a whimsical public face for an agency steeped in arcane technical policy making. He spices his remarks with pop-culture references, citing the TV sitcom “The Office” and the film “The Big Lebowski.” His Twitter feed branches from telecom policy into philosophy, architecture and sports teams from Kansas City, not far from his childhood home in Parsons, Kansas.As chairman, he has made priorities of pruning regulations and pushing for more mobile broadband to feed the nation’s insatiable appetite. With backing from the agency’s Republican majority, he’s compiled a series of victories for the wireless industry -- and at times setbacks for older uses of airwaves.NOAA, for example, said the FCC’s push to reallocate some spectrum would set back satellite-assisted weather forecasting decades. The Transportation Department warned about road safety when a patch of airwaves set aside for driverless cars was reassigned. The Energy Department opposed taking spectrum used by the power companies.Perhaps most memorably, the Defense Department raised alarms about the FCC’s April 20 approval of a mobile broadband network, saying the service will interfere with military and civilian GPS.Wins and losses are closely linked in airwaves policy because of the nature of spectrum -- the invisible electromagnetic waves that carry communications. Each slice of airwaves can carry one use; a second use on the same frequencies threatens interference, just as a shouted conversation in a room can drown out a quiet chat.To avoid conflicts, regulators including the FCC put different services on separate airwaves. Antennas listen for the chatter on their assigned channels, and don’t pick up signals at higher and lower frequencies, which in turn are left to other users.Assignments, including some set decades ago, have come under question as the mobile broadband revolution deepens, bringing fresh demand for airwaves to handle booming wireless traffic. Old services are being forced to move to different airwaves or share their frequencies with new arrivals.Pai’s FCC has worked to set up frequencies for more Wi-Fi and the high-speed gadgetry that will combine to form the 5G revolution of fast, ubiquitous wireless connections -- a priority for the White House and big tech and telephone companies. The changeover promises such wonders as remote surgery, autonomous cars, rich virtual reality video feeds, and factories humming with connected equipment.Pai takes credit for rearranging a dozen swaths of spectrum. The amount of airwaves affected is more those used by all U.S. mobile broadband providers, Pai said in a video posted on the agency website last year.Friction is inevitable as broadband and other wireless technologies vie for space in the crowded tableau of airwaves swaths, known as bands.“Finding new bands or new opportunities to reallocate for new purposes is more difficult than ever before,” said FCC Commissioner Michael O’Rielly, a Republican. “There’s no greenfields to pick from. And so finding new spectrum for a new purpose means reallocating someone who already exists there.”To others, the FCC’s airwaves fights show lax management by the Trump administration, leaving cabinet officers to push their own airwaves priorities.“This is a result of running the administration as if it were an episode of ‘The Apprentice,’” said Harold Feld, senior vice president with the policy group Public Knowledge. “The federal agencies have just stopped cooperating.”Space Force Commander General John Raymond said in a May 6 congressional hearing that Ligado Networks LLC’s plans for a mobile broadband network would interfere with GPS receivers, which rely on faint signals from satellites, and harm training.The FCC shot back that it wouldn’t be moved by “baseless fear mongering.”In a May 26 letter to Representative Adam Smith, chairman of the Armed Services Committee, Pai defended the Ligado decision, saying it “included strict conditions to ensure that GPS operations continue to be protected from harmful interference.”In a teleconference with lawmakers on May 19, Pai said “America needs to lead in 5G and that requires us to think creatively about a variety of different spectrum bands.”Changes keep coming. The FCC in April voted to allow Wi-Fi on the 6 gigahertz airwaves, despite an expression of concern from the Energy Department. Utilities said the change risks interference to electric, water, and gas transmission and distribution systems. Chipmaker Broadcom Inc. called the action “momentous” and “a definitive moment in U.S. wireless history.”Airwaves AuctionMobile providers will get more opportunities in an auction slated to begin in July. Another, potentially larger airwaves sale is to begin Dec. 8 as the FCC offers a wide swath of prime airwaves now used by satellite providers such as Intelsat SA and SES SA. The satellite providers will move aside, keeping enough frequencies to serve current customers; new users will offer mobile broadband.Bidders may include largest U.S. providers Verizon, AT&T Inc. and T-Mobile US Inc., who all snapped up airwaves in earlier FCC auctions.“It isn’t easy to get the government to move quickly on anything,” Meredith Attwell Baker, president of CTIA, a wireless industry trade group with members including AT&T and Verizon, said in an email. Pai “deserves tremendous credit for making sure wireless providers have the spectrum they need to meet our nation’s 5G ambitions.”Not easy, and not without turmoil. The debate with NOAA concerned power levels for an airwaves swath that Verizon won in an FCC auction. The disagreement persisted for much of 2019 before agencies, working with the State Department, arrived at a unified position. The result was a lower power level than the FCC wanted, and more than NOAA preferred.Bipartisan leaders of both the House Science Committee and the Commerce Committee have asked the Government Accountability Office to probe how the NTIA and other federal agencies interact to resolve spectrum disputes.“‪Under the Trump administration, spectrum coordination efforts have repeatedly failed,” Democratic Representative Frank Pallone, of New Jersey, the Commerce Committee chairman, said in an email.Representative Greg Walden, of Oregon, the Commerce Committee’s top Republican, in an email said that “not everyone will be satisfied all of the time” as spectrum allocations are made.Others see confusion.“In this administration, instead of having everyone pull in the same direction, we have disputes that are pulling us apart,” said Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel, the agency’s senior Democrat.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Financial Times

    Six businesses finding an upside in the coronavirus crisis

    As global economic prospects were slashed and markets convulsed by the pandemic, companies rushed to strengthen their finances, and corporate bond issuance surged. This market pile-on, plus a whole ecosystem of traders and investors with no option but to work from home, has been a boon to MarketAxess, an electronic bond trading venue. Rick McVey, chief executive, said a cultural shift had already been under way in the $9.6tn US corporate bond market.

  • Walmart stores suffer damage from George Floyd protests and looting — several hundred forced to close early
    Yahoo Finance

    Walmart stores suffer damage from George Floyd protests and looting — several hundred forced to close early

    Walmart stores suffer damage from the George Floyd protesting and looting in some cases.

  • AUD/USD and NZD/USD Fundamental Weekly Forecast – RBA Takes Backseat to Demand for Risk
    FX Empire

    AUD/USD and NZD/USD Fundamental Weekly Forecast – RBA Takes Backseat to Demand for Risk

    The RBA is expected to leave its benchmark interest rate at 0.25%. We’re also looking for policymakers to leave monetary policy measures intact.

  • With Protests Raging in U.S., Amazon Curbs Operations and Apple Keeps Some Stores Closed
    Bloomberg

    With Protests Raging in U.S., Amazon Curbs Operations and Apple Keeps Some Stores Closed

    (Bloomberg) -- Amazon.com Inc. scaled back deliveries and adjusted routes in cities including Chicago and Los Angeles, Apple kept some outlets shut, while Target Corp. extended store closures nationwide after the death of George Floyd sparked demonstrations across the country.“We are monitoring the situation closely and in a handful of cities we adjusted routes or scaled back typical operations to ensure the safety of our teams,” an Amazon spokeswoman told Bloomberg News.Apple had reopened about 130 of its about 270 stores following the coronavirus pandemic, and most of them were closed on Sunday, the company said in a statement.Protests around the country are complicating operations for companies from Amazon, which has been one of the few consumer-facing companies to generate new business during the pandemic, to Target, which still retains a heavy bricks-and-mortar presence.Based in Minneapolis where Floyd died in police custody, Target had already closed 32 stores in the area. On Sunday, it said it was closing dozens more around the nation, at least temporarily.“We are a community in pain,” Chief Executive Officer Brian Cornell said in a statement shortly after Floyd’s death. “That pain is not unique to the Twin Cities -- it extends across America.”In Chicago and Los Angeles, Amazon delivery drivers received messages Saturday night that said: “If you are currently out delivering packages, stop immediately and return home. If you have not completed your route, please return undelivered packages to the pick-up location whenever you’re able to do so.”Amazon was “in close contact with local officials and will continue to monitor the protests,” and would only re-open delivery stations when it’s safe and will plan delivery routes by monitoring demonstrations in every zip code, according to messages reviewed by Bloomberg.(Adds Apple from first paragraph)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Jobs report, ISM manufacturing: What to know in the week ahead
    Yahoo Finance

    Jobs report, ISM manufacturing: What to know in the week ahead

    It will be a big week for U.S. economic data with the release of the May jobs report and the Institute for Supply Management’s manufacturing index.

  • Older Crowd Embraces Online Banking, Rewards Firms’ Digital Push
    Bloomberg

    Older Crowd Embraces Online Banking, Rewards Firms’ Digital Push

    (Bloomberg) -- It took a global pandemic to get many baby boomers to bank online. Lenders have taken notice.Over the past two months, Americans flocked to websites and apps to manage their finances as the coronavirus limited access to branches, according industry executives. For JPMorgan Chase & Co., existing online clients are using the offerings more frequently, while Bank of America Corp. found that older customers are seeking out its digital services.“We may have opened some people’s eyes to the future,” Bank of America Chief Executive Officer Brian Moynihan told investors at a conference last week. “We’re just on a relentless push.”The coronavirus has given a boost to digital banking, which entails less paper, greater use of electronic services and fewer in-person meetings. Tech has been viewed by banks as both an offensive and defensive tool. Online services have the potential to bring in customers, help cut costly branches and pare workforces, while also making it harder for new competitors to poach clients with the allure of better technology.In April, 23% of new logins to Bank of America’s online and mobile products were by seniors and boomers, Moynihan said. They also accounted for about 20% of customers who deposited checks using mobile phones for the first time. In its business catering to wealthy people, the use of technology has risen over the last six weeks to levels that the bank projected would take six years, according to Andy Sieg, president of Merrill Lynch Wealth Management.One in four people surveyed by Boston Consulting Group said they plan to use branches less or stop visiting altogether when the crisis is over, according to a global poll from April 13 to April 27. The pandemic sparked 12% of the people polled to enroll in online or mobile banking.“We’ve seen tremendous increases in the frequency of use,” said Mindy Hauptman, a BCG partner based in Philadelphia. “If you talked to someone a year ago, they would have said digital was critical to their future. I think that’s been reinforced and accelerated.”Customers were steered toward online banking for a multitude of reasons, Hauptman said. Many stayed home to comply with government orders, while others weren’t able to visit branches because of closures or limited services. As clients flooded call centers to request payment deferrals and inquire about government relief programs, others opted to go online.“This crisis is accelerating the trend toward digital banking,” Goldman Sachs Group Inc. President John Waldron told the conference last week. That’s translated to a 25% jump in active users on the bank’s institutional platform, while its retail arm, Marcus, has seen a 300% surge in visits for financial articles and videos.But the bank’s move to boost online services hasn’t always been smooth -- it delayed until next year the digital offering for its wealth-management unit.The pace of digital adoption remains uneven. In the April survey, only 16% of respondents in the U.S. said they would use branches less often after the crisis, the lowest of any nation in the survey.“We’re a little surprised of seeing in the consumer business that the folks who are already digital are doing more of it,” said JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon. “The folks who aren’t digital aren’t exactly picking it up. And I wish we could find a way to incent them to do that better.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.