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Victims of Amazon

Victims of Amazon

3.22k followers9 symbols Watchlist by Yahoo Finance

This basket consists of brick and mortar who have lost considerable market share to online competition.

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  • Aaron's (AAN) Up 19% in 3 Months: Will Momentum Sustain?
    Zacks45 minutes ago

    Aaron's (AAN) Up 19% in 3 Months: Will Momentum Sustain?

    Aaron's (AAN) is benefiting from strength in the Progressive business due to invoice volume growth and solid customer base. Also, it is progressing well with transformation of the Aaron's business.

  • 4 Retail Stocks That Added 10% or More in a Month Despite Odds
    Zacks1 hour ago

    4 Retail Stocks That Added 10% or More in a Month Despite Odds

    Ignoring the market jitters and speculations, a few stocks have managed to score 10% or more in a month. So, picking up stocks from the space will be a prudent move.

  • Walmart’s Kickstarting a $1 Trillion Driverless Delivery Market
    Bloomberg4 hours ago

    Walmart’s Kickstarting a $1 Trillion Driverless Delivery Market

    (Bloomberg) -- Walmart Inc. came to dominate retailing through its mastery of logistics—the complicated choreography of getting goods from farm or factory to the consumer. But even the world’s biggest store doesn’t make money selling its wares online in the U.S., largely due to runaway shipping costs. So Walmart is turning to robots.On a drizzly morning earlier this month, Walmart’s U.S. chief Greg Foran led reporters to a curbside package pickup kiosk outside its supercenter in Rogers, Arkansas. Idling there were three Ford delivery vans outfitted with self-driving technology developed by a Gatik, a Silicon Valley startup charged with a trial run aimed at cutting Walmart’s middle-mile shipping costs in half. Going driverless in pursuit of profit is a “no-brainer,” Foran said.As the buzz about human-carting robo-taxis starts to short-circuit, an unheralded segment of the driverless future is taking shape and showing promise: goods-moving robo-vans. Rather than serving up hot pizza pies or deploying headless robots to carry groceries to the doorstep, robo-vans travel on fixed routes from warehouse to warehouse or to a smaller pickup point, transporting packages to get them closer, but not all the way, to consumers.This may be the least glamorous part of the driverless delivery business, but the market for these monotonous “middle miles” could reach $1 trillion and may provide the fastest path to prosperity, analysts say.“This area has the least number of obstacles and the most certain return on invested capital in the near term,” said Mike Ramsey, an analyst with consultant Gartner Inc. “If you’re looking to start a business where you can actually generate revenue, this has fewer barriers than the taxi market.”Driving the demand is the boom in online shopping that has helped cause a severe shortage of truck drivers that tops 60,000 unfilled long-haul positions, according the American Trucking Associations. That has sent costs soaring for a job that is among the most dangerous due to the risk of wrecks and long periods spent on the road.Related: `Smokey and the Bandit' Charm Fades as Trucking Hiring Lags“This middle mile is the most expensive part of the whole supply chain; it’s a huge pain point,” said Gautam Narang, CEO of Gatik, which is attempting to automate Walmart’s “hub and spoke” warehouse system. “This fills a big gap in the market.”From a technological standpoint, business-to-business, or B2B, delivery is the straightforward counterpoint to the complexities of autonomous ride-hailing and driverless delivery directly to consumers, known as B2C or last-mile. Robo-vans like those being put to the test at Walmart follow fixed routes over and over, reducing the chance of mishaps and increasing their time in service generating revenue. Many of these routes are already established using human drivers today, so there’s little need to map new paths and create infrastructure to load and receive the goods.Related: Robot Rides Are Going to Deliver Pizza and Parcels Before PeopleFord Motor Co., testing many forms of driverless delivery, calls these repeatable routes “milk runs,” a throwback term to the days of household dairy delivery.“Anything on driverless delivery that is a milk run is a good application for autonomy,” said Sherif Marakby, chief executive officer of Ford’s autonomous vehicles unit. “B2C is a complex implementation for autonomy that will come with time, but B2B just makes it easier because you get volume and you can be more predictable.”The case for robots ferrying packages before people is becoming more compelling as robo-taxis struggle to gain traction. Consumers have grown wary of giving up the wheel, especially after a pedestrian was killed last year by an autonomous Uber Technologies Inc. test car. Waymo, Alphabet Inc.’s driverless unit, initiated limited automated ride-hailing in suburban Phoenix late last year with human “safety drivers” on board. General Motors Co. no longer says it will debut a similar service this year. Instead, CEO Mary Barra now says the rollout will be “gated by safety.”QuicktakeWhen the Driverless Cars Arrive, Will You Climb In?: QuickTakeDriverless delivery also has another big advantage over robo-taxis: no demanding human passengers. “People have more emotions than boxes,” Ford’s Marakby said.Meanwhile, driverless delivery is already hitting the road. Swedish startup Einride recently began low-speed robo-deliveries on public roads in its home country. It has signed up several Fortune 500 clients, like tire-maker Michelin, plus logistics service provider DB Schenker and German grocer Lidl.Looking like a Star Wars Imperial troop transport on wheels, Einride’s T-Pod trucks are 60% cheaper to build because they lack a passenger compartment. If they get into a jam, they can be remote controlled by humans from a command center. One human monitors the remote controls for 10 trucks. The T-Pods operate in self-driving mode 95% of the time, according to CEO and founder Robert Falck.Stuffed with payload and no human driver, a T-Pod can operate around the clock and cut shipping costs in half. That’s why Falck says his company is already profitable, though he declines to give specifics.“There are solid economics behind this and that’s also what the customer realizes,” Falck said. “If you break down the numbers, it’s the best business case out there.”TuSimple, a San Diego startup valued at $1.1 billion, leads a pack of tech outfits seeking to automate long-haul trucking. The company has a fleet of 50 robot Peterbilt and Navistar trucks that have been transporting commercial loads in Arizona for a year. And while it isn’t profitable yet, it expects to book revenue of more than $1 million a month in the second half of the year.“If you break down the numbers, it’s the best business case out there.”In the final two weeks of May, its self-driving big rigs—equipped with cameras that can see more than a half-mile down the road—completed 10 test runs for the U.S. Postal Service of an arduous 1,000-mile stretch from Phoenix to Dallas. Over Memorial Day weekend, the trucks faced howling crosswinds and “mud rain,” a blinding combination of dust, wind and rain. And yet the robo-rigs consistently beat human-driven trucks to the mail depot by as much as two hours.   “We were approaching the edge of our operational design domain,” said Chuck Price, TuSimple’s chief product officer. “But we were able to demonstrate that we can do it much faster, with high consistency and high reliability. So bottom line, it’s more efficient.”By next year, TuSimple says it will pull the safety driver and engineer it currently has babysitting its rigs and go fully driverless—something no robo-taxi has committed to yet. By 2023 or 2024, the company plans to have “commercially ready” robo-rigs rolling out of a factory of a major truck maker.That kind of confidence is hard to come by these days among the purveyors of robo-taxis, still struggling to figure out how to navigate the pedestrians, cyclists and unpredictable traffic of chaotic urban environments. Increasingly, the call of the open road and the mundane middle miles between warehouses is proving to be the clearest path to the autonomous future. That’s why big players like Waymo and Tesla Inc.—still working on driverless people haulers—are also developing robo-rigs.“There’s absolutely a market for this sort of thing,” said Sam Abuelsamid, an analyst with Navigant Research. “People don’t really care much about what goes on behind the scenes to get them the products they want. But the value of all the goods being moved is far more than ride-hailing applications.”To contact the authors of this story: Keith Naughton in Southfield at knaughton3@bloomberg.netMatthew Boyle in New York at mboyle20@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Anne Riley Moffat at ariley17@bloomberg.net, Chester DawsonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Financial Times9 hours ago

    Trump to meet Xi at G20 but says trade deal must be ‘fair’

    Donald Trump on Tuesday praised Chinese president Xi Jinping as a “terrific” leader, but said he would only agree to a trade agreement with Beijing if both sides reached a “fair deal”. Speaking at the launch of his 2020 re-election campaign in Florida, Mr Trump suggested he was not desperate to secure a deal to end the trade war as the two leaders prepared to hold talks at the G20 summit in Japan later this month.

  • Financial Times13 hours ago

    Barnes & Noble results underscore Elliott’s turnround challenge

    The challenge facing Elliott Management to turn around Barnes & Noble was on display, with the bookstore chain reporting weaker revenue and a steeper net loss in its most recent quarter than the market had forecast. in early June to buy the struggling retailer for $683m, including debt, a little more than a year after the activist hedge fund took over UK bookseller Waterstones. Barnes & Noble on Wednesday reported total sales of $755m in the fourth quarter ended April 27.

  • The 1 Part of Walmart’s Online Strategy That Isn’t Working
    Motley Fool18 hours ago

    The 1 Part of Walmart’s Online Strategy That Isn’t Working

    The urban-focused Jet.com hasn’t lived up to expectations.

  • Motley Fool19 hours ago

    Papa John’s Auditor Swap Is Not a Good Look

    The pizza purveyor once again proves itself incapable of not making matters worse, this time with a very poorly timed change.

  • Office Depot (ODP) Plunges 40% in 3 Months: Factors to Blame
    Zacks21 hours ago

    Office Depot (ODP) Plunges 40% in 3 Months: Factors to Blame

    Office Depot's (ODP) lower-than-expected operating performance at the CompuCom division hurts the top line. However, management is undertaking several initiatives to get back on track.

  • Barrons.com22 hours ago

    Best Buy and Lululemon Stock Get a Power Boost From Fitness Trend

    (LULU) (ticker: LULU), recently up 1.7% to $186.47 (ahead of the S&P 500’s 1.1% gain), launched a line of self-care products—including a shampoo and deodorant—targeting male and female athletes. Meanwhile, electronics retailer (BBY) (BBY), recently up 3.0% to $68.62, got a lift from news that it would begin selling “connected fitness products,” including Flywheel indoor cycles and Hydrow rowing machines. “There’s a growing intersection between fitness and technology, and no one knows tech like we do,” a Best Buy executive said in a statement.

  • Amazon Aims to Launch Booze Delivery Services in San Francisco
    Zacksyesterday

    Amazon Aims to Launch Booze Delivery Services in San Francisco

    Amazon (AMZN) is in talks with San Francisco Board of Supervisors for the approval of its liquor license.

  • Dollar General's Bull Run Fueled by Better Comps & Pricing
    Zacksyesterday

    Dollar General's Bull Run Fueled by Better Comps & Pricing

    Dollar General's (DG) commitment toward better pricing, effective inventory management and merchandise initiatives have aided it in carving out a niche in the retail space.

  • Is Best Buy Co. (BBY) Outperforming Other Retail-Wholesale Stocks This Year?
    Zacksyesterday

    Is Best Buy Co. (BBY) Outperforming Other Retail-Wholesale Stocks This Year?

    Is (BBY) Outperforming Other Retail-Wholesale Stocks This Year?

  • These 4 Discount Retail Favorites Command Your Attention
    Zacksyesterday

    These 4 Discount Retail Favorites Command Your Attention

    Discount retailers have succeeded in creating a niche despite the rising popularity of online retailers that has compelled many traditional operators to exit.

  • How to Invest in Apparel Stocks
    Motley Foolyesterday

    How to Invest in Apparel Stocks

    There's no shortage of clothing retailers out there. Here's how to choose the best fit for you.

  • Jet.com Has Almost Vanished -- and That's Fine With Walmart
    Motley Foolyesterday

    Jet.com Has Almost Vanished -- and That's Fine With Walmart

    Walmart paid a pretty penny for the e-commerce brand in 2016, but the retail giant has gotten its money's worth.

  • Financial Timesyesterday

    ECB must end conjuring tricks and begin a structural overhaul

    When the euro was launched, the public was told that the currency union could operate successfully without a “transfer union” or a “debt union”. Mario Draghi’s solution has been to do “whatever it takes” and to offer the necessary transfers and debt support as far away from public view as possible. Mr Wolf suggests that the next ECB president should be someone who, like Mr Draghi, can “pull new rabbits out of the hat”.

  • Kohl's Is Ending Its Off-Price Experiment, While Macy's Doubles Down
    Motley Foolyesterday

    Kohl's Is Ending Its Off-Price Experiment, While Macy's Doubles Down

    The top two department store chains have had radically different experiences with their off-price retail experiments.

  • Amazon Is Improving the Whole Foods Experience
    Motley Fool2 days ago

    Amazon Is Improving the Whole Foods Experience

    Whole Foods has seen a big improvement in customer experience over the past year.

  • Walmart's Taking On Target's Shipt and Amazon Prime Now
    Motley Fool2 days ago

    Walmart's Taking On Target's Shipt and Amazon Prime Now

    Customers can now pay an annual subscription for unlimited grocery delivery.

  • As Amazon Air Threat Grows, First Cracks in Carrier Relationships Appear
    Motley Fool2 days ago

    As Amazon Air Threat Grows, First Cracks in Carrier Relationships Appear

    Other carriers may follow FedEx's lead and reassess their relationship with the e-commerce giant.

  • TGT or ROST: Which Is the Better Value Stock Right Now?
    Zacks2 days ago

    TGT or ROST: Which Is the Better Value Stock Right Now?

    TGT vs. ROST: Which Stock Is the Better Value Option?

  • Is Target (TGT) Outperforming Other Retail-Wholesale Stocks This Year?
    Zacks2 days ago

    Is Target (TGT) Outperforming Other Retail-Wholesale Stocks This Year?

    Is (TGT) Outperforming Other Retail-Wholesale Stocks This Year?

  • Is Walmart (WMT) Stock Outpacing Its Retail-Wholesale Peers This Year?
    Zacks2 days ago

    Is Walmart (WMT) Stock Outpacing Its Retail-Wholesale Peers This Year?

    Is (WMT) Outperforming Other Retail-Wholesale Stocks This Year?

  • Businesses head to DC to make their case against tariffs
    Yahoo Finance2 days ago

    Businesses head to DC to make their case against tariffs

    Public hearings on the next round of tariffs on Chinese goods start on Monday in Washington.