• 'Disney Plus’ was Google’s top US trending search term in 2019
    TechCrunch

    'Disney Plus’ was Google’s top US trending search term in 2019

    Google today released its annual "Year in Search" data that takes a look back at some of the most notable searches of 2019. Specifically, Google looked at the biggest trends -- meaning, search terms that saw the largest spikes in traffic over a sustained period in 2019 compared to 2018. In the U.S., Disney's new streaming service "Disney Plus" was the biggest search trend of 2019, followed by Cameron Boyce, Nipsey Hussle, Hurricane Dorian, Antonio Brown, Luke Perry, Avengers: Endgame, Game of Thrones, iPhone 11 and Jussie Smollet.

  • PayPal's exiting COO Bill Ready to join Google as its new president of Commerce
    TechCrunch

    PayPal's exiting COO Bill Ready to join Google as its new president of Commerce

    In June, PayPal announced its Chief Operating Officer Bill Ready would be departing the company at the end of this year. Now we know where he's ending up: Google. Ready will join Google in January as the company's new commerce chief, reporting directly to Prabhakar Raghavan, SVP, Ads, Commerce and Payments.

  • Australia Bolsters Competition Watchdog to Rein In Tech Giants
    Bloomberg

    Australia Bolsters Competition Watchdog to Rein In Tech Giants

    (Bloomberg) -- Australia will boost the resources of the competition regulator and review privacy laws in an effort to rein in the market dominance of digital giants such as Google and Facebook Inc.A special unit will be set up within the competition watchdog to monitor digital platforms, starting with a focus on online advertising, Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s government said Thursday.The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission will work on a voluntary code of practice to address “bargaining power imbalances” between digital platforms and news media companies. And the government will review the Privacy Act to ensure “privacy settings empower consumers, protect their data and best serve the Australian economy.”The government was responding to a sweeping report published earlier this year by the ACCC that called for a regulatory crackdown on technology giants and recommended penalties and deterrents be imposed for inappropriate storage and use of personal data. Morrison didn’t address many of the 23 recommendations made by the competition watchdog and his government said that more time was needed to consider such complex issues.“I want us to be the model jurisdiction in the world for how we are dealing with digital platforms,” Morrison told reporters. “We have regulation and restrictions that were written for an analog economy. If it’s wrong in the real world, it’s wrong in the digital world.”Google, Facebook Face Australia Crackdown on Market PowerRegulators worldwide have been trying to loosen the tech giants’ grip on everything from advertising and search engines, to news, data and elections.Facebook, the world’s largest social media company is grappling with a mushrooming list of challenges, including federal and state antitrust investigations, criticism of its handling of users’ personal information, and dissatisfaction with its treatment of political content.In July, Facebook agreed to pay $5 billion to the Federal Trade Commission -- the largest privacy fine in the agency’s history -- to resolve the Cambridge Analytica data scandal in which a consulting firm hired by Donald Trump’s campaign obtained data without users’ knowledge from a researcher who created a personality quiz app on the social network.Google was also fined by the FTC to settle claims it violated children’s privacy on its YouTube platform. In September, a nationwide group of U.S. states opened an investigation into whether Google’s advertising practices violate antitrust laws, targeting the heart of the search giant’s business.The ACCC has previously laid bare the control that Alphabet Inc.-owned Google and Facebook exert over Australia’s 25 million-strong population. At least 94% of online searches in Australia go through Google, the watchdog said in December last year. And each month, 17 million locals access Facebook, 17 million watch Google-owned YouTube, and 11 million access Instagram, which is owned by Facebook.Among its recommendations, the ACCC called for merger laws to be updated to recognize the importance of data and for stronger action against copyright infringement.“The government’s role is not to protect domestic businesses from digital competition, but rather to ensure the proper functioning of markets and a fair approach to regulation that ensures the rules of the physical world apply equally to the digital world,” Frydenberg said. While some of the ACCC’s recommendations will be acted on immediately “others will need further consideration and engagement given the complexity of the issues and the potential to have economy-wide effects.”To contact the reporters on this story: Edward Johnson in Sydney at ejohnson28@bloomberg.net;Angus Whitley in Sydney at awhitley1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Edward Johnson at ejohnson28@bloomberg.net, Angus WhitleyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • FedEx Q2 2020 Earnings Preview: Time to Buy Beaten Down FDX Stock?
    Zacks

    FedEx Q2 2020 Earnings Preview: Time to Buy Beaten Down FDX Stock?

    Should investors think about buying beaten down FedEx stock before it releases its second quarter fiscal 2020 earnings results on Tuesday, December 17?

  • Disney+ Passes 22 Million Downloads: Time to Ditch NFLX & Buy Disney Stock?
    Zacks

    Disney+ Passes 22 Million Downloads: Time to Ditch NFLX & Buy Disney Stock?

    Disney+ downloads passed 22 million on mobile devices, the independently owned app-tracking company Apptopia announced Tuesday.

  • Apple (AAPL) Outpaces Stock Market Gains: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    Apple (AAPL) Outpaces Stock Market Gains: What You Should Know

    In the latest trading session, Apple (AAPL) closed at $270.77, marking a +0.85% move from the previous day.

  • Microsoft (MSFT) Outpaces Stock Market Gains: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    Microsoft (MSFT) Outpaces Stock Market Gains: What You Should Know

    Microsoft (MSFT) closed the most recent trading day at $151.70, moving +0.38% from the previous trading session.

  • Bloomberg

    YouTube FTC Push on Kids’ Privacy Criticized by Consumer Groups

    (Bloomberg) -- A coalition of 19 privacy and children’s advocacy groups called on the U.S. Federal Trade Commission to maintain privacy protections for all viewers of content aimed at young people, pushing back on an exception sought by YouTube.The latest clash between the advocacy groups and the internet video giant comes as the agency considers changing its rules under the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, or COPPA, which bans data collection on those under age 13 without parental consent. Initial comments on the rewrite are due Wednesday.In September, YouTube agreed to pay $170 million to settle claims by the FTC and New York State that it violated COPPA, and it announced it would change how viewers can interact with videos directed at kids.In a Monday blog post on the proposed rewrite, the Google unit argued that adults watch content aimed at kids and those over 13 don’t need the protections when engaging in nostalgia viewing, research or seeking parenting advice. Currently companies must extend the protections to anyone watching content aimed at children.Kids and privacy groups, including the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood and the American Academy of Pediatrics, said on Wednesday that creating an exception for those over 13 would be “troubling” and result in under-protection.“Children undoubtedly will patronize child-directed content on their parents’ devices, logged in to their parents’ profiles,” the groups wrote.They also reiterated the call to subpoena information from companies such as Alphabet Inc.’s Google to find out how many adults are actually watching content for kids.The company has maintained that the main YouTube service isn’t for children, and doesn’t allow viewers under the age of 13. In Tuesday follow-up comments to the FTC, Google said methods such as requiring users who are already signed to reenter their passwords or device PINs could demonstrate that an adult is watching, as could providing a fingerprint or prompting facial recognition.The FTC will consider the comments as it reviews the regulations.To contact the reporter on this story: Ben Brody in Washington, D.C. at btenerellabr@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Sara Forden at sforden@bloomberg.net, Alistair BarrFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Buy Amazon (AMZN) Stock on the Dip Before a 2020 Rally?
    Zacks

    Buy Amazon (AMZN) Stock on the Dip Before a 2020 Rally?

    Is now the time to buy Amazon stock on the dip heading into 2020 with AMZN stock down 6% in the last six months?

  • Facebook, Google Drop Out of Top 10 ‘Best Places to Work’ List
    Bloomberg

    Facebook, Google Drop Out of Top 10 ‘Best Places to Work’ List

    (Bloomberg) -- Big tech companies like Facebook Inc. and Alphabet Inc.’s Google, long seen as some of the world’s most desirable workplaces offering countless perks and employee benefits, are losing some of their shine.The Silicon Valley companies dropped out of the Top 10 “best places to work” in the U.S., according to Glassdoor’s annual rankings released Tuesday. HubSpot Inc., a cloud-computing software company, grabbed the No. 1 ranking while tech firms DocuSign Inc. and Ultimate Software were three and eight, respectively.Facebook, which has been rated as the “best place to work” three times in the past 10 years, was ranked 23rd. It’s the social-media company’s lowest position since it first made the list in 2011 as the top-rated workplace. Facebook, based in Menlo Park, California, was ranked seventh last year.Google, voted “best place to work” in 2015 and a Top-10 finisher the previous eight years, came in at No. 11 on Glassdoor’s list. Apple Inc., once a consistent Top-25 finisher, was ranked 84th. Amazon Inc., which has never been known for a positive internal culture, failed to make the list for the 12th straight year.Microsoft Corp. was one of the lone big technology companies to jump in the rankings. The Redmond, Washington-based software company moved to No. 21 from 34 a year ago. A few technology companies made the list for the first time, including SurveyMonkey at No. 33, Dell Technologies Inc. at No. 67 and Slack Technologies Inc. at No. 69.Twenty companies on the list have their headquarters in the San Francisco Bay Area, more than any other metro area, Glassdoor said.The annual list ranks companies using employee reviews on areas such as compensation, benefits, culture and senior management. Many of the big tech companies, including Facebook and Google, have been criticized this year for a myriad of issues, and in some cases employees have publicly opposed executive decisions.At Google, employees have protested against the company on a number of topics, including the company’s “intimidation” tactics against worker organizers. The results of an internal employee poll at the internet search giant, reported by Bloomberg in February, showed that fewer employees were inspired by Chief Executive Officer Sundar Pichai’s vision than a year earlier. It also found fewer workers believe senior management could successfully lead the company into the future.At Facebook, which just like Google provides employees with perks including free meals, corporate transportation and laundry services, workers have pushed back internally against leadership on some policy issues, such as the decision not to fact-check political advertisements.(Updates with new tech entrants in the fifth paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Kurt Wagner in San Francisco at kwagner71@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jillian Ward at jward56@bloomberg.net, Andrew Pollack, Molly SchuetzFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • What the Tech?
    Zacks

    What the Tech?

    Let's REALLY dive deep into the abyss which can be tech. Associate Stock Strategist Dan Laboe, Zacks' resident Tech geek joins us.