T - AT&T Inc.

NYSE - NYSE Delayed price. Currency in USD
38.95
-0.21 (-0.54%)
At close: 4:02PM EST

39.07 +0.12 (0.31%)
Pre-market: 8:27AM EST

Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close39.16
Open38.97
Bid39.05 x 2900
Ask39.05 x 3000
Day's range38.69 - 39.08
52-week range26.80 - 39.58
Volume25,468,928
Avg. volume30,085,933
Market cap283.004B
Beta (3Y monthly)0.61
PE ratio (TTM)17.46
EPS (TTM)2.23
Earnings date29 Jan 2020
Forward dividend & yield2.04 (5.21%)
Ex-dividend date2019-10-09
1y target est38.71
  • Financial Times

    Apple aims for streaming big bang with Plepler talks

    When Richard Plepler left his perch as head of HBO in February, it signalled the end of an era for a cable network synonymous with high-quality television. In recent months, the 59-year-old magnate has ...

  • How Disney+ Is Already Reforming The Streaming Space
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    How Disney+ Is Already Reforming The Streaming Space

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  • Buy Roku Stock at a 'Discount' on Disney, Apple & Streaming TV Growth?
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  • Telecom ETFs in Focus on Mixed Q3 Earnings Results
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    Telecom ETFs in Focus on Mixed Q3 Earnings Results

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  • Streaming Wars Get Hot for Disney, Netflix, Roku and The Trade Desk
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    Streaming Wars Get Hot for Disney, Netflix, Roku and The Trade Desk

    The content explosion is creating massive new opportunity for advertisers and the one platform that connects everything.

  • Want To Retire Early? Learn the Intelligent Investing Secret - November 13, 2019
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    Want To Retire Early? Learn the Intelligent Investing Secret - November 13, 2019

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  • Amdocs (DOX) Q4 Earnings Surpass, Revenues Meet Estimates
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    Amdocs (DOX) Q4 Earnings Surpass, Revenues Meet Estimates

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  • AT&T Enters Into Agreement With Amdocs for Digital Upgrade
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    AT&T Enters Into Agreement With Amdocs for Digital Upgrade

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  • India Imperils Foreign Investment With Telecom Cash Grab
    Bloomberg

    India Imperils Foreign Investment With Telecom Cash Grab

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- For Kumar Mangalam Birla’s textile-to-telecom empire, adversity is a 100-year-old companion. In 1919, when the Indian businessman’s great-grandfather wanted to start a jute mill, the dominant British firm, Andrew Yule & Co., bought all the surrounding Calcutta land. The Imperial Bank, the forerunner of today’s State Bank of India, initially refused Birla a loan.(1)The government of post-independence India stymied the Birla conglomerate with kindness. Soviet-style planning and state socialism protected the family’s legacy licensed firms by keeping competition out. But they inhibited growth. Birla’s father, Aditya Vikram, went to Thailand, Indonesia and the Philippines because he wasn’t allowed to expand at home. “I for one fail to see where the concentration of economic power is: with the big business houses or with the government?” he wondered in 1979. Fast forward 40 years, and the 52-year-old current chairman of the group would be justified to reprise his late father’s frustration. The liberalizing spirit of the 1990s Indian economy has lost much of its force. After dismantling the license raj, a system of strict government-controlled production, and encouraging capitalism, New Delhi is gripped once more by a feverish statism that’s making Birla’s shareholders nervous. The slide began before Prime Minister Narendra Modi came to power in 2014, and was one of the reasons why businesses backed his call for “minimum government, maximum governance.” But five years later, relations between private enterprise and the government have turned even testier.Take telecommunications, the main source of investors’ anxiety. Ever since India opened up the state-run sector in the 1990s, the Aditya Birla Group has been an anchor investor. Partners and rivals like AT&T Inc., India’s Tata Group, and Li Ka-shing’s CK Hutchison Holdings Ltd. came and went, but Birla remained. Currently, the group owns 26% of the country’s largest mobile operator by subscribers, Vodafone Idea Ltd., with the British partner controlling 45%. An Indian court last month directed this bruised survivor of a nasty price war to pay 280 billion rupees ($4 billion) in past government fees, interest and penalties. Overall, India wants to gouge its shriveled telecom industry of $13 billion. The fund-starved government expects operators to cough up more at 5G auctions next year. How long can the Birla boss hang in? With Vodafone Idea saddled with losses and $14 billion in net debt, should he even bother?It’s doubtful whether partner Vodafone Group Plc will linger. This isn’t the first time it has been clobbered by unreasonable government demands. In 2012, India retrospectively changed its tax law to pursue a $2.2 billion withholding tax notice against the U.K. firm. Seven years later, that dispute is far from resolved, and the unit has now been slapped with a new bill.In its half-yearly earnings reported Tuesday in London, Vodafone fully wrote down the book value of its India operations, and warned that the unit could be headed for liquidation. Vodafone’s 42% stake in a separate cellular tower company in the country, once sold, will get used largely to pay off the loan it took to pump capital into the main telecom venture. After that, the U.K. firm will have a little over $1 billion left to support Vodafone Idea, according to India Ratings & Research, a unit of Fitch Ratings. However, the India business would be required to find $5.5 billion just for interest- and spectrum-related payments until March 2022.Will Birla step into the breach?Out of the Indian group’s 26% in Vodafone Idea, about 11.6% is held by Grasim Industries Ltd., and another 2.6% is owned by Hindalco Industries Ltd. Hindalco, among the world’s largest aluminum makers, is battling weak metals demand and a complicated takeover of the U.S.-based Aleris Corp. The bulk of the burden of a telecom rescue — should there be one — would fall on Grasim. It acts as a holding company for Birla’s cement and financial services businesses, apart from directly owning factories that churn out wood-based fiber and chemicals like caustic soda used in soap and detergent.Mumbai-based Emkay Global Financial Services says that in the worst-case scenario, where the government doesn’t back down and Birla refuses to fold his telecom cards, a rescue mounted by by Grasim could cost it 187 rupees per share. If Birla refrains from throwing good money after bad, the value of everything else Grasim owns net of debt is 1,126 rupees a share, or 47% more than the current stock market price. Clearly, the overhang of the Vodafone uncertainty is playing on investor psyche. Once the U.S.-China trade war stops making global textile markets jittery, fiber prices will firm. Grasim, in investors’ view, is better off spending $2 billion on new capacities in fiber, chemicals and cement than wasting any more money trying to salvage the telecom venture.The Indian government should see the folly of effectively turning the telecom industry into a two-horse race between Reliance Jio Infocomm Ltd., controlled by Mukesh Ambani, the richest Indian, and Bharti Airtel Ltd., which, too, is staggering under a mountain of debt. As IIFL Securities put it, bankruptcy of Vodafone Idea would hurt all stakeholders. Vodafone and Birla would lose control, the government would forgo $1.7 billion in annual spectrum revenue and banks would take losses on their $4 billion-plus exposure.Such an outcome would cast a serious doubt on the ability of private entrepreneurs to flourish, especially if they — like Birla or Amazon.com Inc. boss Jeff Bezos — happen to find themselves in competition with Ambani in a tightly regulated industry. Future investors will think twice. The rift between the government and business wasn’t Modi’s creation, but to allow the mistrust to turn into a chasm would be one of his administration’s gravest mistakes.(1) See, “Aditya Vikram Birla: A Biography” by Minhaz Merchant, Penguin India, 1997To contact the author of this story: Andy Mukherjee at amukherjee@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Patrick McDowell at pmcdowell10@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andy Mukherjee is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering industrial companies and financial services. He previously was a columnist for Reuters Breakingviews. He has also worked for the Straits Times, ET NOW and Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • GlobeNewswire

    AT&T and Amdocs Expand Strategic Alliance

    Amdocs (DOX), a leading provider of software and services to communications and media companies, and AT&T* (NYSE:T), are extending their collaboration to modernize and upgrade AT&T’s digital business support systems under a multi-year managed services agreement. "5G and the cloud will lead to new business and consumer applications we haven’t even imagined yet, and developers and creators will look to us to help make those visions a reality," said Andre Fuetsch, EVP & Chief Technology Officer, AT&T. "As the ecosystem continues to expand, we need to provide a solid foundation to build on. "AT&T has always driven our industry forward, improving the way people live and work," said Shimie Hortig, group president, Americas at Amdocs.

  • Streaming revolution may bring an even bigger disrupter soon
    Yahoo Finance

    Streaming revolution may bring an even bigger disrupter soon

    Disney+ has a chance of becoming a major player in the streaming world. However, a major change can be on the horizon that would take streaming entertainment to the next level.

  • Bloomberg

    Everyone Gets Paid in CBS-Viacom Except Shareholders

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Is it just me, or does the $100 million “severance” being paid to Joe Ianniello, the acting chief executive officer of CBS Corp., stink to high heaven? For starters, you can make a pretty compelling Elizabeth Warren-esque argument that handing a $100 million “severance” to someone who is not, in fact, leaving the company is exactly why income inequality has become such a hot-button issue.But let’s be old school about this. Let’s focus on the shareholders and how this is their money that’s being handed to Ianniello. It is also an unpleasant reminder of how the father-daughter combo of Sumner and Shari Redstone seemingly can’t resist throwing hundreds of millions of dollars at executives who have not done much for their stockholders.The Redstones, of course, control CBS through their privately held film exhibition company, National Amusements Inc. They also control Viacom Inc., which Sumner Redstone bought for $3.4 billion in 1987. (Viacom acquired CBS in 1999.) Until 2016, Sumner Redstone, now 96, was the executive chairman of both companies, though he had largely disappeared from public view two years earlier amid allegations that he was in serious decline. Shari Redstone, 65, is the vice chairman of both companies.In 2003, when CBS was still part of Viacom — and Sumner Redstone was still in charge — Les Moonves became its CEO, a position he retained when CBS was spun off in late 2005. Between 2007 and 2018, when Moonves was fired for sexual improprieties, the CBS board, led by the Redstones, paid him just shy of $700 million, according to figures compiled by Bloomberg. That’s an average of $63.6 million a year.I happen to think that $63 million a year is an absurd amount to pay a manager to run a company. But even if you accept that entertainment companies pay their executives insane amounts — Discovery Inc. paid its CEO, David Zaslav $129.4 million last year, for crying out loud — it is reasonable to assume that such an outsized paycheck would be justified by outsized performance.Not so. During the Moonves era at CBS, the S&P 500 Index returned an average of 9% a year. CBS returned 8.7% a year. In other words, the Redstones and the CBS board paid hundreds of millions of dollars of its shareholders’ money to a man who could barely keep pace with an index fund. (By comparison, the Walt Disney Co. returned 14.6%, and 21st Century Fox returned 10.5%.)The situation at Viacom is even worse. Remember Philippe Dauman, the former CEO whom Sumner Redstone once called “the wisest man I know”? He ran Viacom for a decade, from 2006 to 2016. According to Equilar, a company that compiles executive compensation figures, his compensation during those 10 years was nearly $500 million — while the stock gained a paltry 2.7% a year on average. You may recall that Dauman wound up in a nasty court fight with the Redstones in 2016, trying to keep his job by contending that Sumner Redstone was no longer mentally competent to make key business decisions. After winning that battle, the Redstones still handed Dauman a parting gift as they pushed him out the door: a $75 million severance package.Which brings us back to Ianniello. Although he has been acting CEO only since Moonves departed late last year, Ianniello has also been the recipient of the Redstones’ largesse: Between 2016 and 2018, as the company’s chief operating officer, his compensation averaged $27 million a year, according to Bloomberg. The stock? It dropped from the low 70s to the mid-40s during those three years. This is what’s known as “pay for pulse.”So why did Shari Redstone feel the need to hand Ianniello an additional $100 million? The reasons are twofold. First, Redstone is recombining Viacom and CBS. She doesn’t want Ianniello to leave — at least not right away — but she also isn’t going to make him the top dog. Second, for legal reasons, she can’t ramrod this deal through by herself, even though she is the controlling shareholder. She needs the CBS board and senior management to support the bid. “You need Joe to get the merger done,” Robin Ferracone, the CEO of executive compensation consulting firm Farient Advisors, told Bloomberg. “So you need to make him indifferent to whether he’s going to lose his job or not.”Yes, $100 million is certainly likely to buy a whole lot of indifference. Then again, $10 million probably could have achieved the same result. And in any case, if Shari Redstone needs $100 million to, er, persuade one of her executives to support her merger plan, maybe that suggests the merger’s success is not exactly a slam dunk.I have a hard time seeing how combining two underperforming media companies with a hodgepodge of assets will create a worthy competitor to powerhouses such as Disney, which rolled out its Disney+ streaming service on Tuesday morning, and AT&T, which next year will bundle its media assets into another streaming entrant, HBO Max. But Shari Redstone wants to combine Viacom and CBS, and with the help of that $100 million, that’s what’s going to happen. When the companies are merged, which is expected to take place next month, the CEO of the combined entity will be Bob Bakish, who is Viacom’s CEO.Since he took over Viacom, Bakish’s compensation has been surprisingly normal, at least by modern CEO standards. According to company filings, he received about $20 million a year in total pay in 2017 and 2018.But fear not. Once the deal is done, Bakish’s pay is set to jump to more than $30 million. I predict that he’ll be in Moonves/Dauman territory in no time. After all, overpaying executives is the Redstone way.To contact the author of this story: Joe Nocera at jnocera3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Daniel Niemi at dniemi1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Joe Nocera is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering business. He has written business columns for Esquire, GQ and the New York Times, and is the former editorial director of Fortune. His latest project is the Bloomberg-Wondery podcast "The Shrink Next Door."For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • 100 million people could power Apple's stock to new records: analyst
    Yahoo Finance

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    Apple stands to make some serious cash from its entry into the streaming space with Apple TV+.

  • Financial Times

    Former HBO chief executive Plepler in talks to produce content for Apple

    Richard Plepler, the former chief executive of HBO, is in talks to produce content for Apple, according to two people familiar with the matter, which would see the tech group snag one of the most high profile Hollywood names for its new television service. Mr Plepler left HBO abruptly earlier this year, as part of an exodus from the company in the wake of AT&T’s blockbuster acquisition of Time Warner. Mr Plepler has since established his own company, RLP, to produce shows.

  • Streaming Wars Commence as Disney+ Nears Debut
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  • Disney+, Netflix, Apple, HBO, & More: Who Will Win the Streaming TV War?
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    Disney+, Netflix, Apple, HBO, & More: Who Will Win the Streaming TV War?

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  • Adam Neumann's Older Look-Alike Might Make We Work
    Bloomberg

    Adam Neumann's Older Look-Alike Might Make We Work

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- John Legere may be exactly the kind of CEO WeWork needs. He brings much of the eccentricity and charisma that was initially appreciated about ousted founder Adam Neumann, but without all the headaches and liabilities. Is Legere ready to retire his closet of magenta T-shirts? We Co., the parent of the beleaguered office-sharing startup, is in discussions to recruit Legere, the current head of wireless carrier T-Mobile US Inc., as its next CEO,  the Wall Street Journal reported on Monday. The talks come after WeWork’s plans for an initial public offering imploded in grand fashion in recent weeks, as a litany of questionable decisions and conflicts of interests involving then-CEO Neumann came to light in a saga that has captivated Wall Street. WeWork, for a short time one of the world’s most valuable startups, had said in its summer IPO prospectus that its “future success depends in large part on the continued service of Adam Neumann.” Weeks later, Neumann was considered such a risk that the company decided it was better to effectively give him $1.2 billion to step away.Hiring Legere would immediately help improve WeWork’s tarnished reputation, though repairing the business is another story. Office vacancies increased in the third quarter, and the company was at risk of running out of cash next year. Legere’s garish style and hectoring on Twitter may also cause some to wonder whether he’s just another Neumann; it’s certainly hard not to notice the physical resemblance between the long hair, loud personality and signature T-shirt-and-sports-coat pairing.But few CEOs can say they’ve taken on a challenge as difficult as reviving T-Mobile — and succeeded. That’s Legere’s claim to fame. As I wrote in July 2018, even the groaners who are tired of his shtick and Twitter snark can’t argue against his track record.When Legere became CEO of T-Mobile in 2012, it was a distant fourth-place competitor in the U.S. wireless market and losing customers. Now it’s the fastest-growing member of the industry, and its displaced Sprint as the No. 3 carrier. T-Mobile’s lower-priced plans and marketing mojo have even given AT&T Inc. and Verizon Communications Inc. a run for their money. In the last five years, shares of all its closest rivals advanced anywhere from 12% to 21%. T-Mobile’s nearly tripled. Legere may seem like an odd choice given that he’s spent his career working in the telecommunications and technology industries. The connection becomes clearer when considering SoftBank Group Corp.’s role. The Japanese conglomerate built by billionaire Masayoshi Son not only controls WeWork — the result of a $9.5 billion rescue package — but also Sprint Corp., T-Mobile’s closest competitor and hopeful merger partner. Sprint Executive Chairman Marcelo Claure, who is also chief operating officer of SoftBank, was tapped to help fix WeWork’s problems. He’s spent a lot of time with Legere these last two years as they worked to sway federal and state officials to support the merger of the two wireless carriers. Legere has done with T-Mobile what Claure and his predecessors couldn’t with Sprint, even as SoftBank injected billions along the way. One might think that WeWork would seek out a lower-profile leader, given the roller-coaster it has been on the past few months; Legere is anything but that. And at 61 years old, it’s a little surprising that he would consider following up such a successful run at T-Mobile with a stint at a company as troubled as WeWork. T-Mobile has become part of his identity — he’s spotted in magenta T-Mobile gear whether he’s going for runs in New York City or filming his Facebook Live cooking show from his kitchen. T-Mobile shareholders wouldn't be happy to see Legere go. Worse, there's the appearance of a conflict of interest if SoftBank is pursuing Legere while the companies are separately renegotiating the terms of the Sprint merger.That aside, it’s clear that Legere likes a challenge, and WeWork is the ultimate one.To contact the author of this story: Tara Lachapelle at tlachapelle@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tara Lachapelle is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the business of entertainment and telecommunications, as well as broader deals. She previously wrote an M&A column for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • How to Maximize Your Retirement Portfolio with These Top-Ranked Dividend Stocks - November 11, 2019
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  • Financial Times

    Online streaming: Television’s looming car crash

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  • Disney reveals what it will do with Hulu
    Yahoo Finance

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  • Disney 4Q earnings glide past expectations ahead of Disney+ launch
    Yahoo Finance

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  • Bloomberg

    Discovery Looks to Create Its Own Hulu by Taking Channels Online

    (Bloomberg) -- Discovery Inc. wants to create its own version of Hulu.The cable-programming giant said Thursday that it’s considering combining its suite of TV channels into a streaming service that would be available directly to consumers in the U.S.Discovery sees “an opportunity to take content on a broader basis to mount an attack on those who are not existing cable subscribers,” Chief Executive Officer David Zaslav said on an earnings call. The company is looking at “aggregating all of our content in the U.S. and having something that looks very different.”The comments came with Discovery’s stock soaring after it reported third-quarter earnings that topped analysts’ estimates. The shares jumped as much as 12%, the most since February 2009, to $30.90 in New York trading.The new streaming platform would be a significant strategic shift for Discovery, which has been more cautious than other media giants in making its channels available to people who don’t get cable-TV subscriptions.While AT&T Inc.’s HBO and CBS Corp. made their channels available to cord cutters a few years ago, Discovery until recently had limited its non-cable offerings mostly to Europe and to niche audiences. But like other media companies, Discovery is losing subscribers to cord cutting, forcing the company to consider bypassing the cable bundle.Unscripted ProgrammingDiscovery, which bought Scripps Networks Interactive Inc. last year, owns several channels that feature unscripted programming, including HGTV, Animal Planet, TLC and the Discovery channel. By combining those channels into one streaming service, Discovery would be taking a page from Walt Disney Co.’s Hulu, which has long offered shows from broadcast channels to people who don’t pay for cable-TV service.While Disney and AT&T are planning streaming services in the U.S. with numerous expensive, scripted shows, Zaslav said Discovery’s streaming strategy is less risky because its unscripted programming costs far less to make.Zaslav said he didn’t think making its channels available to cord cutters would violate Discovery’s contracts with pay-TV distributors like Comcast Corp. or AT&T’s DirecTV.Sports RightsDiscovery has been assembling the rights to sports and nonfiction programming to launch new online video channels. It offers a streaming service for golf fans and an online video channel in Europe that Zaslav calls “the Netflix for sports.”Discovery is also planning new streaming-video services with the BBC’s natural-history programming and the stars of HGTV’s “Fixer Upper,” Chip and Joanna Gaines. And it recently introduced a new online channel called Food Network Kitchen that lets subscribers watch live cooking classes with famous chefs and have recipe ingredients delivered to their homes.Discovery has said it expects to spend $300 million to $400 million on its digital efforts in 2019.To contact the reporter on this story: Gerry Smith in New York at gsmith233@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Nick Turner at nturner7@bloomberg.net, John J. Edwards IIIFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.