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Qantas Airways Limited (QAN.AX)

ASX - ASX Delayed price. Currency in AUD
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3.2600+0.0600 (+1.87%)
At close: 4:10PM AEST
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Previous close3.2000
Open3.2500
Bid3.2600 x 0
Ask2.9900 x 0
Day's range3.2100 - 3.3100
52-week range2.0300 - 7.4600
Volume13,086,034
Avg. volume16,424,457
Market cap4.906B
Beta (5Y monthly)1.02
PE ratio (TTM)5.90
EPS (TTM)0.5530
Earnings date20 Aug 2020
Forward dividend & yield0.26 (8.13%)
Ex-dividend date02 Mar 2020
1y target est7.08
  • What Type Of Returns Would Qantas Airways'(ASX:QAN) Shareholders Have Earned If They Purchased Their SharesThree Years Ago?
    Simply Wall St.

    What Type Of Returns Would Qantas Airways'(ASX:QAN) Shareholders Have Earned If They Purchased Their SharesThree Years Ago?

    Many investors define successful investing as beating the market average over the long term. But the risk of stock...

  • Bloomberg

    The World’s Jumbo Jets Are Heading for the Boneyard

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The queens of the skies have fallen on hard times.As Covid-19 has frozen the international travel on which they once thrived, double-decker, four-engine planes like the Airbus SE A380 and Boeing Co. 747 are more likely to be found in storage than soaring through the skies.Carriers such as Pan Am Corp. used the 747 to turn aviation into a global industry in the 1970s, and over the past decade Emirates used the A380 to repeat the trick for the global south — but those times have passed. Since mid-March, most have barely flown except on short hops to maintain pilots’ certifications and valedictory voyages to gather dust in desert boneyards.Many of those furloughs look like becoming permanent. IAG SA’s British Airways has announced plans to ground the largest fleet of 747-400s for good. Qantas Airways Ltd. sent its last 747 home to the U.S. last week, and has already suspended its stable of A380s.Among the 15 operators of the A380, which entered service less than 13 years ago, only Emirates has been operating flights in anything close to a normal fashion, according to data from aircraft-tracking site Flightradar24. Out of its 115 such planes — about half the global fleet — just a dozen have been flying to and from Europe over the past month or so, as limited traffic has trickled back. China Southern Airlines Co. has also been running a limited service with its five A380s.However, the vast majority of the planes — worth some $50 billion, if valued at about half of their list prices — have been stuck on the tarmac, possibly permanently. Qatar Airways QCSC has speculated that its A380s may never return, while Deutsche Lufthansa AG has made similar noises.By the time the long-haul routes for which the A380 was designed return to normal in 2024 or so, about half the fleet will be at least a decade old and well on the way toward retirement. Singapore Airlines Ltd., the biggest operator after Emirates, said in first-quarter results that it may write down “older generation aircraft” such as its A380s by around $1 billion.It’s a similar picture with the 747. Of the 29 planes operated by Lufthansa — the largest passenger fleet, once British Airways’ jets have retired — just four have remained in regular operation since March, with a further four gradually returning to service over the past two months.Probably the most active operator of passenger 747s at this point is Aeroflot PJSC’s Rossiya Airlines, plus a handful of charter operators that run seasonal flights to holiday destinations and pilgrimage services to Saudi Arabia. Even there, though, foreign pilgrims at this year’s hajj will be confined to 10,000 people already in the country.The reasons for the decline of these jets aren’t hard to discern. Even at the best of times, it can be challenging to fill more than 400 seats at a time, and a plane with more than 20% of seats empty will typically lose money — and that’s before you start thinking about the costs of providing crew and destination accommodation for such vast aircraft.With the Boeing 787 and Airbus A350 able to achieve similar ranges using just two engines and smaller cabins, the economics of double-decker planes no longer make a lot of sense.U.S. airlines in particular have long since given up on the jumbo. They never bought a single A380, and last took delivery of a 747 a few months after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, when Northwest Airlines Corp. bought two before later going bankrupt and being taken over by Delta Air Lines Inc.There’s one area that’s been booming, however: freight. Air cargo typically takes up a substantial share of the belly space on passenger flights, but with borders closed to tourism, the semiconductors, high-value materials and consumer goods that typically travel beneath your feet have had to find a new route to market. Cargo traffic this year will be down just 17% from a year earlier, compared to 55% for passenger flights, according to the International Air Transport Association.That could provide a final chapter for the 747 — although not for the A380, which isn’t easily converted to cargo usage. Boeing’s jumbo is already a freight aircraft in all but name, with about two-thirds of the latest 747-800 variant being sold to freight carriers such as United Parcel Service Inc. and Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd.’s logistics arm. Even non-cargo aircraft can get in on the act: KLM has been carrying face masks and protective gowns on the seats of ordinary passenger aircraft pressed into pandemic freight service.That would be an appropriate end for grand planes often likened to ocean liners. Some of the most celebrated ships of the great age of sea transport ended their lives as coal hulks, quarantine centers and floating museums after aircraft rendered them obsolete. The ultimate fate of jumbo jets may be similarly prosaic: As workaday aircraft, shipping goods to a more home-bound global population. This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.David Fickling is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering commodities, as well as industrial and consumer companies. He has been a reporter for Bloomberg News, Dow Jones, the Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times and the Guardian.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Private Equity Only Loves Virgin Australia for Its Loyalty
    Bloomberg

    Private Equity Only Loves Virgin Australia for Its Loyalty

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- What could possibly attract Bain Capital about an airline that hardly ever generates cash? Loyalty is almost certain to be the answer.Administrators for Virgin Australia Holdings Ltd. at Deloitte agreed to sell the second-ranked Australian airline to the private equity firm after it collapsed in April owing A$6.8 billion ($4.7 billion). In a sign of what a difficult path lies ahead of Bain, interest from 20 parties was ultimately whittled down to just two final bidders. Airlines, with their vast capital expenditures, weak competitive positions, and already-heavy debt loads, aren’t the most obvious places for private equity to invest. Most firms look for businesses that can consistently throw off cash before returning to market at an enhanced valuation a few years later.Virgin hardly fits that bill: The company has posted positive annual free cash flow just three times in two decades. It’s hard to see how a few years of business in the time of coronavirus is going to enhance its market value much. That’s particularly the case given that Qantas Airways Ltd., which spent much of the past decade demonstrating the power of its superior market share, has just strengthened its balance sheet through a capital raising.There is, however, one part of Virgin that’s perennially attractive to private equity — its Velocity frequent-flier program. It’s not unusual for airlines to be essentially loyalty programs with wings — Qantas’s is often the most profitable part of the business, and Air Canada’s spun-off program Aimia Inc. mostly traded at a higher multiple than its former parent until it was bought back a few years ago. Velocity has already been a winner for private equity. Affinity Equity Partners bought a 35% stake in the program in 2014 and sold it back last year at a A$2 billion valuation. That’s more than twice what it originally paid, and far more than the A$1.2 billion or so that the entire airline was worth before coronavirus struck, not to mention the zero value now put on Virgin Australia’s equity. The biggest challenge for Bain will be what to do with the main bit of the business — but that’s not an impossible task. While details haven’t been released of what a post-insolvency Virgin will look like, you’d expect the administration process to bring an end to many of the asset impairments and interest expenses that have weighed so heavily on earnings in recent years, giving an opportunity to spruce it up for selling back to the market. Australia’s stock investors are famous for buying dog-eared companies from private equity and repenting at their leisure.Bain has promised to “invest in and see closer integration” of the loyalty program and the core flying business, though it’s not clear that this amounts to a promise never to separate the two. Don’t be surprised if 18 months from now the next big IPO in Sydney is a seemingly-rejuvenated Virgin Australia, shorn of its lucrative loyalty program. Just don’t make the mistake of buying into it.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.David Fickling is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering commodities, as well as industrial and consumer companies. He has been a reporter for Bloomberg News, Dow Jones, the Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times and the Guardian.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.