QAN.AX - Qantas Airways Limited

ASX - ASX Delayed price. Currency in AUD
7.15
+0.08 (+1.13%)
At close: 4:10PM AEDT
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close7.07
Open7.12
Bid7.86 x 0
Ask6.44 x 0
Day's range7.10 - 7.15
52-week range5.18 - 7.46
Volume9,577,052
Avg. volume9,626,021
Market cap11.053B
Beta (5Y monthly)0.41
PE ratio (TTM)13.14
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings dateN/A
Forward dividend & yield0.26 (3.63%)
Ex-dividend date02 Sep 2019
1y target estN/A
  • Australia’s Wildfire Crisis: Key Numbers Behind the Disaster
    Bloomberg

    Australia’s Wildfire Crisis: Key Numbers Behind the Disaster

    (Bloomberg) -- Australia is in the grip of deadly wildfires burning across the country, triggering an emotive debate about the impact of climate change in the world’s driest-inhabited continent. The unprecedented scale of the crisis, and images of terrified tourists sheltering on beaches from the infernos, has shocked many Australians.With the nation only midway through summer and suffering a prolonged drought, authorities fear the death toll will continue to mount as more homes and land are destroyed. Here are some key details of the crisis:How many people have died?Since the fire season began months ago during the southern hemisphere winter, at least 28 people have died. Among the fatalities are volunteer firefighters, including a young man who died when his 10-ton truck was flipped over in what officials have described as a “fire tornado.” Australia’s worst wildfires came in 2009 when the Black Saturday blazes left 180 people dead.How big an area has burned?Massive tracts of land have burned. Almost 12 million hectares (30 million acres) have been destroyed -- that’s almost the size of England. In New South Wales state alone, more than 5.2 million hectares of forest and bush has been destroyed, while more than 1.4 million hectares has been burned in Victoria. The fires are so large they are generating their own weather systems and causing dry lightning strikes that in turn ignite more. One blaze northwest of Sydney, the Gospers Mountain fire, has destroyed about 512,000 hectares -- about seven times the size of Singapore.The scale of the blazes dwarfs the California wildfires in 2018, which destroyed about 1.7 million acres, and about 260,000 acres in 2019.How many homes have been destroyed?Some 2,600 homes have been destroyed, mostly in New South Wales. Scores of rural towns have been impacted, including the community of Balmoral about 150 kilometers southwest of Sydney, which was largely destroyed before Christmas.What’s the economic impact?The near-term cost is mounting. Toxic smoke shrouding Canberra has shuttered businesses and government departments and forced national carrier Qantas Airways Ltd. to cancel flights. The Australian Open, the first Grand Slam of 2020 that brings in an estimated A$290 million, has seen qualification games disrupted due to the smoke. Economists estimate the wildfires and associated drought could cut up to half a percentage point off GDP growth as agriculture, tourism and sentiment take a hit.How has wildlife been affected?The University of Sydney estimates that 800 million animals have been killed by the bushfires in New South Wales alone since September and one billion have died nationally. The “highly conservative figure” includes mammals, birds and reptiles killed either directly by the fires, or later due to loss of food and habitat. The fires have raised concerns in particular about koalas, with authorities saying as much as 30% of their habitat in some areas had been destroyed. Images of the marsupials drinking water from bottles after being rescued have gone viral on social media.How can I help?Donations are flooding in to help with the relief effort, led by wealthy philanthropists, companies, investment banks and a string of celebrities. Mining billionaire Andrew Forrest’s Minderoo Foundation has pledged A$70 million. Morgan Stanley Chief Executive Officer James Gorman, who is Australian, is pitching in A$1 million, while pledges have come in from stars such as Elton John, Chris Hemsworth, Bette Midler and Nicole Kidman.\--With assistance from Jason Scott.To contact the reporter on this story: Edward Johnson in Sydney at ejohnson28@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Edward Johnson at ejohnson28@bloomberg.net, Jason ScottFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • 3 Warren Buffett dividend shares you can buy right now
    Motley Fool

    3 Warren Buffett dividend shares you can buy right now

    If you want some Warren Buffett dividend shares you can find some ASX stock ideas in this article, including Coca-Cola Amatil Ltd (ASX:CCL). The post 3 Warren Buffett dividend shares you can buy right now appeared first on Motley Fool Australia.

  • Should you get a credit card in 2020?
    Motley Fool

    Should you get a credit card in 2020?

    With services like Afterpay Ltd (ASX: APT) available, should you even get a credit card? Here's some pros and cons.The post Should you get a credit card in 2020? appeared first on Motley Fool Australia.

  • Oil prices crash lower after Middle East tensions ease
    Motley Fool

    Oil prices crash lower after Middle East tensions ease

    Beach Energy Ltd (ASX:BPT), Santos Ltd (ASX:STO) and Woodside Petroleum Limited (ASX:WPL) could come under pressure after oil prices crashed...The post Oil prices crash lower after Middle East tensions ease appeared first on Motley Fool Australia.

  • 5 things to watch on the ASX 200 on Thursday
    Motley Fool

    5 things to watch on the ASX 200 on Thursday

    Platinum Asset Management Ltd (ASX:PTM), Qantas Airways Limited (ASX:QAN), and Santos Ltd (ASX:STO) shares will be on watch on the ASX 200 on Thursday...The post 5 things to watch on the ASX 200 on Thursday appeared first on Motley Fool Australia.

  • Singapore Air, Qantas Avoid Flights Over Iran After Attacks
    Bloomberg

    Singapore Air, Qantas Avoid Flights Over Iran After Attacks

    (Bloomberg) -- Singapore Airlines Ltd. and Qantas Airways Ltd. were among carriers that diverted flights to skip Iranian airspace as hostilities in the Persian Gulf sparked by the U.S. killing of a top Iranian general ignited fears of a wider conflict in the Middle East.“In view of the latest developments in the region, all SIA flights in and out of Europe are diverted from the Iranian airspace,” Singapore Airlines said in an emailed statement. “We are monitoring the situation closely and will make the appropriate adjustments to our routes if necessary.” The carrier didn’t elaborate.A Boeing Co. jet flown by Ukraine International Airlines crashed shortly after takeoff from Tehran Wednesday morning, killing all on board. Local officials said initial assessments suggest the incident was caused by a technical issue.Boeing 737 Bound for Ukraine Crashes in Iran; No SurvivorsEarlier in the day, Iran fired rockets at two U.S.-Iraqi airbases, the Pentagon said, in response to the killing of General Qassem Soleimani by American forces last week. The Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps claimed responsibility for the barrage, which the U.S. said was launched from Iran and targeted the Ayn al-Asad base in western Iraq and another facility in Erbil. It wasn’t immediately clear whether there were casualties or major damage from the attacks.Qantas said it will change its services to avoid flying over Iraq and Iran. Its Perth-London flight is the only one that will be affected, with about 40 to 50 minutes added to the journey. Malaysia Airlines and Vietnam Airlines also said their flights will be adjusted.The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration has barred civilian services over Iraq, Iran, the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman, the agency said in an emailed statement. The effect of the restrictions wasn’t immediately clear because it had already prohibited U.S. carriers from flying over most of those areas.(Updates with Qantas, Malaysia Air and Vietnam Airlines)To contact the reporter on this story: Kyunghee Park in Singapore at kpark3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Young-Sam Cho at ycho2@bloomberg.net, Will Davies, Ville HeiskanenFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Why Magellan, Pendal, Qantas, & WiseTech Global shares are sinking lower
    Motley Fool

    Why Magellan, Pendal, Qantas, & WiseTech Global shares are sinking lower

    The Magellan Financial Group Ltd (ASX:MFG) share price and the Qantas Airways Limited (ASX:QAN) share price are two of four sinking lower on Wednesday...The post Why Magellan, Pendal, Qantas, & WiseTech Global shares are sinking lower appeared first on Motley Fool Australia.

  • Shareholders Are Loving Qantas Airways Limited's (ASX:QAN) 3.7% Yield
    Simply Wall St.

    Shareholders Are Loving Qantas Airways Limited's (ASX:QAN) 3.7% Yield

    Today we'll take a closer look at Qantas Airways Limited (ASX:QAN) from a dividend investor's perspective. Owning a...

  • Here’s why the Qantas share price is falling out of the sky
    Motley Fool

    Here’s why the Qantas share price is falling out of the sky

    Here's why the Qantas Airways Ltd (ASX: QAN) share price is falling today on the ASXThe post Here’s why the Qantas share price is falling out of the sky appeared first on Motley Fool Australia.

  • Why Bega Cheese, Costa, Qantas, & SeaLink shares are dropping lower
    Motley Fool

    Why Bega Cheese, Costa, Qantas, & SeaLink shares are dropping lower

    The Bega Cheese Ltd (ASX:BGA) share price and the Costa Group Holdings Ltd (ASX:CGC) share price are two of four dropping lower...The post Why Bega Cheese, Costa, Qantas, & SeaLink shares are dropping lower appeared first on Motley Fool Australia.

  • Celebrities Pledge Support for Wildfire Crisis: Australia Update
    Bloomberg

    Celebrities Pledge Support for Wildfire Crisis: Australia Update

    (Bloomberg) -- Authorities are assessing mass property damage across southeastern Australia after searing temperatures and strong winds exacerbated catastrophic wildfires Saturday in one of the worst days of the weeks-long crisis.Dozens of communities, from small towns on the south coast of New South Wales, to alpine villages in neighboring Victoria state, were razed as fires grew so large they generated dry thunderstorms. Milder weather, including patchy rain, across scorched areas brought some relief Sunday, though flame-fanning wind gusts have frustrated efforts to quell about 200 blazes before fire conditions worsen later in the week, authorities said.Thousands of people, including tourists, heeded the advice of authorities and evacuated a 350-kilometer (217-mile) stretch of coastline as well as dangerous inland areas over the past few days to escape the intensifying infernos. But many remained, hosing down their properties to protect against falling embers as they anxiously waited to see if the winds would blow the fire front in their direction.The unfolding tragedy, that’s blackened about 5 million hectares (12.3 million acres) across New South Wales, Victoria and South Australia alone, has prompted millions of dollars of donations and support from international celebrities, sports stars, and the British Royal Family.Australia Fire Maps: Where the Devastating Wildfires Are BurningTwo people died in wildfires that have destroyed more than a third of South Australia’s Kangaroo Island, devastating the national park and farmland and severely damaging the luxury Southern Ocean Lodge resort. Penrith, on the outskirts of Sydney, reached a record 48.9 degrees Celsius (120 degrees Fahrenheit) Saturday, symbolic of the dangerous weather conditions that have fanned ferocious flames and sparked new blazes further south.Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced Saturday an unprecedented level of military support to boost firefighting and recovery efforts as the national death toll from four months of infernos rose to 23.A video set to electronic music posted on Morrison’s Twitter and Facebook accounts outlining the additional measures sparked thousands of comments. Some praised the deployment of as many as 3,000 army reservists, while others, including the Australia Defence Association, lambasted the 50-second clip, which spawned mocking renditions.Morrison told reporters Sunday that the video was produced to “communicate as simply and helpfully” as possible what the government is doing to help people.Australia’s Wildfire Crisis: Key Numbers Behind the DisasterHere’s the latest (all times local):Emergency warnings (4:30 p.m.)Emergency warnings remain for three wildfires in Victoria, and one has prompted a call to evacuate now, even as cooler weather has brought some relief, the state’s Emergency Management Commissioner Andrew Crisp told reporters in Melbourne. About 800,000 hectares (2 million acres) have been burned in East Gippsland and 180,000 hectares have been razed in the state’s northeast, he said.“We have had a couple of very difficult days,” Premier Daniel Andrews told the media briefing. “Today is a bit easier.”The number of people unaccounted for across the state has fallen to four from seven earlier Sunday, Andrews said. His government will contribute A$2 million ($1.4 million) to a Victorian Bushfire Fund supported by Bendigo and Adelaide Bank Ltd., almost matching pledged donations from the public, to support relief and recovery efforts in affected communities.Flights canceled (3:00 p.m.)Qantas Airways Ltd. canceled afternoon flights arriving in and departing from Canberra, where air pollution was at least four times higher than the minimum threshhold for “hazardous, ” prompting the release of particulate-filter masks from the national stockpile. Mail deliveries to the national capital were suspended Friday by Australia Post, which cited the impact of poor air quality on the safety of its workers.Eden threat (2:50 p.m.)Fire activity has eased around the southeastern New South Wales town of Eden, the New South Rural Fire Service said. Earlier, massive wildfires that crossed the Victorian border encroached on the coastal town, prompting warnings from authorities for those remaining there to leave.Dozens of people had sought shelter on Eden’s wharf, but police say that area is no longer safe, ABC reported. The Rural Fire Service said people in the town should seek shelter in a solid structure and enact their fire plans.The Royal Australian Navy’s HMAS Adelaide is stationed offshore with about 400 personnel to aid relief efforts.Energy impact (1:17 p.m.)Extensive wildfire activity in the Snowy Mountains region of New South Wales has hindered electricity supplies, the state’s Department of Planning, Industry & Environment said in a statement.The Australian Energy Market Operator, TransGrid, and state and territory governments are working closely to keep power supplies on, but weather conditions Sunday may cause power to be turned off in parts of the network ahead of peak evening demand.New Zealand aid (12:40 p.m.)New Zealand will send three helicopters and crew and two army combat engineer sections to Australia as part of additional support for wildfire-fighting efforts, Defense Minister Ron Mark said.The New Zealand contingent will deploy in the coming week to the Royal Australian Air Force’s Edinburgh based in Adelaide, South Australia, and will remain in Australia at least until the end of January, Mark said in a statement Sunday.Fire Emergencies (12:30 p.m.)Firefighters are battling 48 blazes across Victoria state, including two that represent a severe threat, the state’s Emergency Management Commissioner Crisp told reporters in Melbourne.About 900,000 hectares have been razed, mostly in the state’s East Gippsland region. Seven people are unaccounted for in the state, which has maintained “disaster” footing to heighten the political response to the crisis, which Crisp described as “dynamic” and “dangerous,” even as cooler weather and rain helped quell the firefronts.Recovery agency (11:30 a.m.)Australia will mount a national bushfire recovery agency to run for two years to support the health and well-being of people affected by the wildfires and recovery efforts, Morrison told reporters in Canberra. The government’s midyear budget projections are still on track even with the additional fire-fighting costs, he said.The government is calling for helicopter support from allies to help combat the wildfires, Defense Minister Linda Reynolds said during the briefing.Losses mount (11:08 a.m.)The Insurance Council of Australia estimates fire-related losses at A$375 million from 5,850 claims received so far. It’s the “widest ranging bushfire catastrophe that we have ever declared,” Campbell Fuller, a spokesman for the council, told ABC television.Assessments of property damage from Saturday’s inferno are expected to be tallied later Sunday.Milder weather (8:15 a.m.)Milder conditions in New South Wales are providing some relief after a “very long night for many residents,” New South Wales Premier Gladys Berejiklian told reporters in Sydney.No one is unaccounted for in the state. Authorities may have estimates of the extent of property damage as early as Sunday afternoon, she said.Almost 150 “volatile, dynamic” fires are still blazing across the state, Rural Fire Service Commissioner Shane Fitzsimmons said, after the service’s second-busiest day.“It was an awful day yesterday, a very difficult day,” Fitzsimmons said, adding that hot weather forecast later in the coming week may bring more fires.Property losses will run into the “hundreds,” he said. Four firefighters were injured battling blazes in New South Wales, and a 47-year-old man died from a cardiac arrest after aiding efforts.Property damage (7:30 a.m.)Communities are bracing for news of property damage and loss early Sunday after another long night for firefighters. Southern New South Wales was ablaze into the early hours, with two emergency-level fires burning, including in the Bega Valley, near Victoria’s northeastern border.Cooler weather and light rain across parts of eastern Victoria has provided some relief and enabled firefighters to reduce the number of emergency-level fires to 4 from 17.‘Atomic bomb’ (5 a.m.)Officials issued new emergency warnings for bushfires that hit communities including Buldah, Cann River and Club Terrace in Victoria, saying it’s too late to leave. Hours earlier, residents of Dandongadale and Nug Nug were advised to evacuate immediately.At midnight, the fire service in New South Wales said the threat is “still not over” with seven fires at emergency warning and 11 labeled watch and act. A statewide total fire ban remains in effect for Sunday.“This is not a bushfire,” New South Wales Transport Minister Andrew Constance told ABC radio. “It’s an atomic bomb.”\--With assistance from Edward Johnson and Ben Bartenstein.To contact the reporter on this story: Jason Gale in Melbourne at j.gale@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Shamim Adam at sadam2@bloomberg.net, Stanley JamesFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • 4 ASX shares to buy now for sustainable dividends in 2020 and beyond
    Motley Fool

    4 ASX shares to buy now for sustainable dividends in 2020 and beyond

    To generate long-term sustainable income, we need to buy undervalued shares, producing solid and stable dividends. These 4 ASX shares are currently screening as undervalued.The post 4 ASX shares to buy now for sustainable dividends in 2020 and beyond appeared first on Motley Fool Australia.

  • 3 ASX 50 blue-chip shares to buy in 2020
    Motley Fool

    3 ASX 50 blue-chip shares to buy in 2020

    If your portfolio needs a few solid additions, check out these 3 ASX 50 blue-chip shares to buy ahead of the new year.The post 3 ASX 50 blue-chip shares to buy in 2020 appeared first on Motley Fool Australia.

  • How pairing ASX shares can help reduce risk
    Motley Fool

    How pairing ASX shares can help reduce risk

    Here's how pairing ASX shares can reduce some risks in your investing portfolioThe post How pairing ASX shares can help reduce risk appeared first on Motley Fool Australia.

  • Kickstart your first ASX portfolio with these iconic Australian companies
    Motley Fool

    Kickstart your first ASX portfolio with these iconic Australian companies

    If you’re ready to take 100% control of your own destiny on the share market, why not kickstart your ASX portfolio with these 3 iconic, historically reliable Australian companies.The post Kickstart your first ASX portfolio with these iconic Australian companies appeared first on Motley Fool Australia.

  • Is Qantas Airways Limited (ASX:QAN) A High Quality Stock To Own?
    Simply Wall St.

    Is Qantas Airways Limited (ASX:QAN) A High Quality Stock To Own?

    While some investors are already well versed in financial metrics (hat tip), this article is for those who would like...

  • Is the Qantas share price overvalued right now?
    Motley Fool

    Is the Qantas share price overvalued right now?

    The Qantas Airways Ltd (ASX: QAN) share price could come under pressure from its $2.5 billion frequent flyer liability in FY 2020.The post Is the Qantas share price overvalued right now? appeared first on Motley Fool Australia.

  • Coles and Woolworths under fire over privacy concerns
    Motley Fool

    Coles and Woolworths under fire over privacy concerns

    Why Woolworths Group Ltd (ASX: WOW) and Coles Group Ltd (ASX: COL) are under fire over their 'free' customer loyalty programsThe post Coles and Woolworths under fire over privacy concerns appeared first on Motley Fool Australia.

  • Is the Long Short Fund share price on a road to redemption?
    Motley Fool

    Is the Long Short Fund share price on a road to redemption?

    Here's why the L1 Long Short Fund Ltd (ASX: LSF) share price has been delivering on the ASX latelyThe post Is the Long Short Fund share price on a road to redemption? appeared first on Motley Fool Australia.

  • Why the Qantas share price just hit a new record high
    Motley Fool

    Why the Qantas share price just hit a new record high

    The Qantas Airways Ltd (ASX: QAN) hit a new record high on Monday as the ASX 200 stock surged 1.96% higher to start the week.The post Why the Qantas share price just hit a new record high appeared first on Motley Fool Australia.

  • 3 ASX shares that made waves last week
    Motley Fool

    3 ASX shares that made waves last week

    Westpac Banking Corp (ASX: WBC) was one of the three ASX shares that caught my eye last week.The post 3 ASX shares that made waves last week appeared first on Motley Fool Australia.

  • ALL ORDINARIES finishes higher Friday: 8 ASX shares you missed
    Motley Fool

    ALL ORDINARIES finishes higher Friday: 8 ASX shares you missed

    The S&P/ASX 200 (Index:^AXJO)(ASX:XJO) and ALL ORDINARIES (Index:^AXAO) (ASX:XAO) finished higher on Friday, here are 8 ASX shares you missed.The post ALL ORDINARIES finishes higher Friday: 8 ASX shares you missed appeared first on Motley Fool Australia.

  • Qantas share price on watch after ACCC approval
    Motley Fool

    Qantas share price on watch after ACCC approval

    The Qantas Airways Ltd (ASX: QAN) share price is one to watch after gaining approval from the ACCC for its BP rewards deal.The post Qantas share price on watch after ACCC approval appeared first on Motley Fool Australia.