QAN.AX - Qantas Airways Limited

ASX - ASX Delayed price. Currency in AUD
6.28
-0.24 (-3.60%)
As of 3:00PM AEDT. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close6.52
Open6.30
Bid6.28 x 0
Ask6.29 x 0
Day's range6.14 - 6.30
52-week range5.18 - 6.77
Volume8,857,892
Avg. volume6,937,771
Market cap9.871B
Beta (3Y monthly)-0.07
PE ratio (TTM)11.55
EPS (TTM)0.54
Earnings date22 Aug 2019
Forward dividend & yield0.26 (4.09%)
Ex-dividend date2019-09-02
1y target est7.08
  • Why Bravura, Mirvac, Qantas, & WiseTech shares dropped lower today
    Motley Fool

    Why Bravura, Mirvac, Qantas, & WiseTech shares dropped lower today

    The Qantas Airways Limited (ASX:QAN) share price and the WiseTech Global Ltd (ASX:WTC) share price are two of four dropping lower on Thursday...The post Why Bravura, Mirvac, Qantas, & WiseTech shares dropped lower today appeared first on Motley Fool Australia.

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  • Qantas profits to be hit by Hong Kong protests and US-China trade war
    Motley Fool

    Qantas profits to be hit by Hong Kong protests and US-China trade war

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  • Announcing: Qantas Airways (ASX:QAN) Stock Soared An Exciting 309% In The Last Five Years
    Simply Wall St.

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  • World’s Longest Flights Aren’t Meant for Cattle Class
    Bloomberg

    World’s Longest Flights Aren’t Meant for Cattle Class

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The question about Qantas Airways Ltd.’s plans to start 20-hour direct flights from Sydney to London and New York isn’t why any passenger would want to take the route — it’s why any carrier would want to offer them.For all the hardship of spending a day cooped up with the body odors of a couple of hundred other humans, long-haul flying isn’t a particularly attractive business for airlines, either.Qantas’s international unit made just 10.7 Australian cents of revenue per seat, per kilometer flown in its last fiscal year through June, of which 10.3 Australian cents was eaten up on operating costs. If you fly the roughly 17,000 kilometers (10,500 miles) between London and Sydney and buy a decent bottle of liquor at duty free, the A$70 ($48) you’ll spend will quite possibly be more money than the operating profit Qantas made on your ticket for the entire flight. Qantas’s Jetstar budget carrier makes about twice the profit per kilometer that the international business brings in, and its mainline domestic unit is five times more profitable.So what gives? Establishing ultra-long-haul routes is no easy task. Qantas is modifying in-flight menus and lighting patterns and using its staff as guinea pigs in a test flight this weekend to examine how passengers will cope with such a long journey.Costs don’t explain it. Indeed, they’re likely to be somewhat worse on direct ultra-long-haul flights than on more conventional routes. On a fully-laden twin-aisle passenger jet, fuel will often weigh more than all the passengers and cargo. Breaking the journey and refueling en route at a hub airport is a good way of keeping costs down, because it means that you don’t have to carry fuel for the second “leg” of the flight.Revenue, however, is a different matter. Qantas’s domestic business is so profitable because it has a single struggling rival, Virgin Australia Holdings Ltd. Despite flying more passengers in the 12 months through June than it did six years earlier, Australia’s domestic aviation network operated fewer flights. That’s possible because the muted competition between Qantas and Virgin gives them the discipline to keep a lid on capacity growth, allowing more people to be squeezed onto each plane and keeping prices high.International routes aren’t normally like that. At least a dozen different airlines typically compete to ferry passengers between Australia and Europe, and those with hub airports mid-route can easily serve multiple destinations in a way that would be crippling to an end-of-line carrier like Qantas. The partnership between Qantas and Emirates, which started in 2013, was intended to get around this problem by funneling the Australian carrier’s passengers onto the huge network operated by its Gulf partner. While that’s helped return the international unit to profit, margins are vanishingly thin.Ultra-long-haul flights are best understood as a way for the likes of Qantas to reverse the disadvantage that this tyranny of distance engenders. It will never have the network and operations to compete with the geographic advantages of hub carriers in moving passengers between Australia, Europe and North America. However, if it can tempt the more profitable premium passengers away from hub airports with a more direct route, it at least has some ammunition on its side next time it enters negotiations with Emirates about how to share revenues from their flights. You can see this even just looking at its aircraft seat maps. About 18% of the seats on Qantas’s Boeing Co. 787-9 that it uses to fly from Perth to London and on routes between Australia and the U.S. are in business class, with another 12% in premium economy. That’s a larger share of high-margin seats than on the planes that had previously been the workhorses of its international network.It’s probably right to be skeptical that spending 20 hours in economy class can be as glamorous as Qantas’s elaborate pre-testing makes it sound. The only way airlines can make decent money flying to the far side of the world is by letting business class subsidize the rest of the cabin. If you’re flying coach, these flights aren’t really aimed at you.To contact the author of this story: David Fickling at dfickling@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Matthew Brooker at mbrooker1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.David Fickling is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering commodities, as well as industrial and consumer companies. He has been a reporter for Bloomberg News, Dow Jones, the Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times and the Guardian.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Financial Times

    FirstFT: Today’s top stories 

    The country’s trade war with the US, slowing income growth and cooling manufacturing investment took a toll on the world’s second-largest economy between July and September, according to the figures released by the National Bureau of Statistics on Friday.

  • ALL ORDINARIES finishes higher Tuesday: 8 ASX shares you missed
    Motley Fool

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  • Why the Qantas share price is at a new 52-week high
    Motley Fool

    Why the Qantas share price is at a new 52-week high

    Why the Qantas Airways Limited (ASX: QAN) share price has hit a new 52-week highThe post Why the Qantas share price is at a new 52-week high appeared first on Motley Fool Australia.

  • Your Evening Briefing
    Bloomberg

    Your Evening Briefing

    (Bloomberg) -- Want to receive this post in your inbox every afternoon? Sign up hereStocks declined, oil retreated and the dollar strengthened after China poured cold water on U.S. President Donald Trump’s declaration Friday that there was a deal to partially settle the trade war. Administration officials say they still expect the accord to happen.  Here are today’s top storiesAfter clearing the way for Turkey to attack the Kurds, the Trump administration says it’s now imposing sanctions on Turkey for doing so. The attack on the Kurds, who were American allies before Trump ordered a retreat of U.S. forces, has included civilian deaths, executions and fire aimed by Turkey near American soldiers. The Kurds have since struck a deal with the Syrian government, which is allied with Russia. Senator Bernie Sanders is a more dangerous enemy of billionaires than Senator Elizabeth Warren, say two economists.In Ohio, the 2020 presidential race will be a fight for the suburbs, and it may be tougher for Republicans this time around.Get ready for the 20 hour flight. This weekend, Qantas Airways flies direct from New York to Sydney for the first time. No airline has ever completed that route without stopping. America’s shale boom got the world accustomed to soaring production. Now growth has slowed, and a cloud has formed over the industry.There’s an army of women being trained to close the gender pay gap. What’s Joe Weisenthal thinking about? The Bloomberg news director is thinking about what the bond market has been doing lately. An inability to rally on bad news earlier this month was a marked change from the euphoric bond buying of late August, Joe says. What you’ll need to know tomorrowAnother ex-administration official testified in impeachment hearings. Senator Kamala Harris fought payments to the wrongfully convicted. Uber fired 350 more employees, but says it’s the last wave of cuts. WeWork is removing phone booths due to formaldehyde. South Korea has declared war on North Korea’s sick hogs. A mysterious stock surge means a billionaire is born in Indonesia. Nearing the Brexit finish line, Boris Johnson stumbles again. What you’ll want to read in Bloomberg EconomicsU.S. recession chances are at 27% over the next 12 months. Recession fears have grown in recent months thanks to Trump’s trade war with China, pullbacks in corporate hiring and a U.S. manufacturing sector that’s already slipped into contraction. The economy is cooling, but the big question is whether the slowdown will morph into something darker. Bloomberg Economics created a model to determine America’s recession odds. Right now, the indicator estimates the chance of a downturn at some point in the next year is 27%. That’s higher than it was a year ago, but lower than before the last recession. There are reasons to keep a close eye on the economy, but don’t panic yet. To contact the author of this story: David Rovella in New York at drovella@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Financial Times

    What I learnt from my hellish long-haul flight

    Not that long ago, I did something that friends in Australia had been telling me to do for ages: take the 17-hour nonstop flight from Heathrow to Perth. “It’s amazing,” gushed one, who had been among the ...

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    Motley Fool

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  • Financial Times

    FirstFT: Today’s top stories

    The National Oil Tankers Company of Iran, which owns the Sabity or Sabiti tanker, said two separate missiles hit the vessel at 5am and 5.20am local time, damaging two main reservoirs on board and causing an oil leak into the Red Sea. State media said the tanker was 60 miles off Jeddah. Brent crude, the international oil benchmark, climbed 2.1 per cent to $60.36 a barrel as traders responded to the event.

  • Financial Times

    Qantas hopes its ultra-long-haul flights will go the distance

    Qantas Airways will begin testing the longest direct flights in the world next Friday, as the Australian airline aims to stretch the boundaries of technological innovation in a bid to woo premium passengers ...

  • Why Goldman Sachs just downgraded Qantas shares
    Motley Fool

    Why Goldman Sachs just downgraded Qantas shares

    The Qantas Airways Limited (ASX:QAN) share price could come under pressure today after Goldman Sachs downgraded the airline's shares to neutral...The post Why Goldman Sachs just downgraded Qantas shares appeared first on Motley Fool Australia.

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    Motley Fool

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  • 3 top value credit cards to earn Qantas points
    Motley Fool

    3 top value credit cards to earn Qantas points

    If you're looking for a few good-value credit cards, here are 3 of my favourites for earning Qantas Points at the moment.The post 3 top value credit cards to earn Qantas points appeared first on Motley Fool Australia.

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  • Macquarie Group sells 50% stake in Hobart International Airport
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    Macquarie is one of the world's largest investors in airports and passenger jets.

  • We Think Qantas Airways (ASX:QAN) Is Taking Some Risk With Its Debt
    Simply Wall St.

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  • Here's What We Like About Qantas Airways Limited (ASX:QAN)'s Upcoming Dividend
    Simply Wall St.

    Here's What We Like About Qantas Airways Limited (ASX:QAN)'s Upcoming Dividend

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  • Qantas tests world's longest commercial flight
    Reuters Videos

    Qantas tests world's longest commercial flight

    It's the ultimate in long haul flights. Australian airline Qantas have tested out a non-stop journey from New York to Sydney -- lasting nearly 20 hours and spanning more than 16,000 kilometres, or just over 10,000 miles.. The idea was to research how the world's longest commercial airplane journey would impact pilots, crew and passengers. Qantas CEO Alan Joyce (SOUNDBITE) (English) QANTAS CEO, ALAN JOYCE, SAYING: "This is a really historic moment for Qantas, a really historic moment for Australian aviation and a really historic moment for world aviation. We are the first commercial airline to fly non-stop from New York to Sydney" With demand for air travel rapidly growing and aircraft performance improving, carriers are increasingly looking into ultra-long-haul travel. Qantas said the aim of the research flight was to increase health and wellness, minimize jet lag and identify optimum crew rest and work periods. The International Air Transport Association expects the worldwide number of annual passengers to grow from 4.6 billion this year to 8.2 billion by 2037.

  • Qantas Airways CEO Sees Demand For 20 Plus Hour Flight From New York to Sydney
    Bloomberg

    Qantas Airways CEO Sees Demand For 20 Plus Hour Flight From New York to Sydney

    Oct.17 -- Alan Joyce, Qantas Airways Ltd. chief executive officer, discusses the airline's nearly 20-hour nonstop flight from New York to Sydney. He speaks with Bloomberg's Caroline Hyde and Scarlet Fu on "Bloomberg Markets: The Close."