LMT - Lockheed Martin Corporation

NYSE - NYSE Delayed price. Currency in USD
384.44
+1.10 (+0.29%)
At close: 4:03PM EST

384.44 0.00 (0.00%)
After hours: 5:19PM EST

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Previous close383.34
Open383.50
Bid383.30 x 800
Ask385.35 x 800
Day's range383.25 - 386.77
52-week range241.18 - 399.96
Volume737,917
Avg. volume1,090,384
Market cap108B
Beta (3Y monthly)0.95
PE ratio (TTM)18.28
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings dateN/A
Forward dividend & yield9.60 (2.50%)
Ex-dividend date2019-11-29
1y target estN/A
  • Bloomberg

    Pentagon Must Demand Refunds on Flawed F-35 Parts, Congress Says

    (Bloomberg) -- The Pentagon must press Lockheed Martin Corp. to recoup fees paid to the No. 1 defense contractor for F-35 parts that weren’t ready to use in the planes after delivery to the military, according to the planned defense policy bill for this fiscal year.“Consistent with the findings and recommendations” of the Pentagon inspector general in a June report, the Pentagon “shall seek relief” for delivery of “non-compliant ready-for-issue spare parts pursuant to a contract under the F–35 aircraft program,” lawmakers said in the policy report for the $738 billion authorization measure.The House is expected to approve the conference report on the measure (S. 1790) as early as Wednesday, sending it to the Senate for final passage.Lockheed failed to supply ready-to-install spare parts, from wheels and tire assemblies to seats -- and may have been overpaid as much as $10.6 million, according to the inspector general.The parts were considered inadequate for installation not because of safety or manufacturing problems but because they were delivered without the required log of electronic data needed by maintenance crews, containing information such as a part’s history and its remaining useful life, according to the report. Parts aren’t supposed to be installed without the data.Pentagon F-35 spokesman Greg Kuntz said in a statement that the program office and the Defense Contract Management Agency have collected data from Lockheed for an analysis that could serve as a basis for negotiations with the company. “The program office in coordination with the DCMA will make a determination early next year on potential compensation for previous” noncompliant parts, he said.Lockheed Martin spokeswoman Carolyn Nelson said in a statement that the company “was paid in accordance with the contractual agreements. The contract payments referenced in the report are calculated on a number of factors, including some that are controlled by the U.S. Government and are outside of Lockheed Martin’s control.”To contact the reporter on this story: Tony Capaccio in Washington at acapaccio@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Bill Faries at wfaries@bloomberg.net, Larry LiebertFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Lockheed Martin Wins $153M Deal to Aid F-35 Aircraft Program
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    Lockheed Martin Wins $153M Deal to Aid F-35 Aircraft Program

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  • Why We Like Lockheed Martin Corporation’s (NYSE:LMT) 24% Return On Capital Employed
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    Why We Like Lockheed Martin Corporation’s (NYSE:LMT) 24% Return On Capital Employed

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  • Defense Stock Roundup: GD Wins Big Deal, CW Boosts Buyback Program
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  • CACI Wins $438M Task Order to Aid Air Force C4ISR Program
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  • Bloomberg

    How Blacklisting Companies Became a Trade War Weapon

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. Tariffs aren’t the only weapon in a trade war. Countries are also turning to “blacklists” to restrict the economic activities of certain foreign companies. While such steps are often described as necessary to preserve national security, they’re increasingly being deployed as policy tools to gain leverage in trade negotiations. In the case of the U.S. and China, disputes over human rights or geopolitics also can play a role.1\. Where is this happening?President Donald Trump has placed dozens of Chinese companies on the U.S. Commerce Department’s “entity list” -- a classification that restricts their ability to purchase U.S. software and components. China’s government has been considering hitting back with a blacklist of its own, targeting foreign companies, organizations and people it calls “unreliable entities.” Export powerhouses Japan and South Korea also have deployed trade restrictions in a renewal of a long feud dating back to Japan’s colonization of the Korean peninsula in the early 20th century.2\. Who is on the U.S. list?The most prominent among those blacklisted in May, primarily on national security grounds, is Huawei Technologies Co., the telecommunications giant at the forefront of fifth-generation, or 5G, mobile technology. In October, the U.S. added 28 Chinese companies -- including another eight technology giants -- for alleged human rights violations against Uighur Muslims in China’s far west Xinjiang province. Those companies include two of the world’s largest manufacturers of video surveillance products, Hangzhou Hikvision Digital Technology Co. and Zhejiang Dahua Technology Co., and a pair of artificial-intelligence companies, SenseTime Group Ltd. and Megvii Technology Ltd.3\. How is China responding?Slowly. In May, it said it was compiling its own list of “unreliable entities,” defined as those having “severely damaged the legitimate interests” of Chinese firms by not obeying market rules, violating contracts or blocking or cutting off supply for noncommercial reasons. None were identified but FedEx Corp. has been under particular scrutiny after China accused it of mis-routing some parcels sent by Huawei. In July, Chinese state media raised the specter of backlash against U.S. companies including General Dynamics Corp. and Honeywell International Inc. in connection with a proposed $2 billion U.S. arms sale to Taiwan. A month later, China vowed retaliation against U.S. companies participating in a proposed $8 billion U.S. sale of Lockheed Martin Corp. F-16 fighter jets to Taiwan. It also has pledged to retaliate against Trump’s sanctions related to human rights violations.4\. When will that happen?Soon, the Communist Party-backed Global Times said in early December. It reported said the list was being sped up in response to a bill moving through the U.S. Congress requiring measures against Chinese officials involved in alleged abuses of Uighurs. The bill passed the Senate in September and the House was set to vote on it in December. However, Chinese officials have said “soon” before.5\. What does it mean to be blacklisted by the U.S.?Those on the U.S. entity list are prohibited from doing business with American companies without first obtaining a U.S. government license. It was created in 1997 as a way to sanction companies that helped build weapons of mass destruction. It’s since been expanded to cover activities considered “contrary to the national security or foreign policy interests of the United States.” Targets can be “businesses, research institutions, government and private organizations, individuals, and other types of legal persons,” according to the Commerce Department’s Bureau of Industry and Security, which administers the list as part of U.S. Export Administration Regulations.6\. What about by China?Unclear. “Necessary measures will be taken” against those listed, was all Ministry of Commerce spokesman Gao Feng said when he announced it May 31. However, the broad definition opens the possibility that a great swath of the global technology industry could be targeted, including U.S. giants such as Google, Qualcomm and Intel, as well as non-American suppliers that have cut off Huawei like Toshiba Corp. and SoftBank Group Corp.’s ARM Holdings. Global Times Editor-in-Chief Hu Xijin said on his Twitter feed that U.S. officials and diplomats might face visa and travel restrictions.7\. What explains the increased use of blacklists?It’s part of what trade hawks in both governments see as a generational fight for technological and economic supremacy of the 21st century. The Chinese government has leveraged its massive state resources to support industrial policies like “Made in China 2025,” and a 2017 development strategy that aims to make China the world’s primary artificial intelligence innovation center by 2030. The Trump administration, backed by many in Congress, views this as a threat to America’s economic and national security and has actively sought to curb China’s technological ambitions.To contact the reporters on this story: Bryce Baschuk in Geneva at bbaschuk2@bloomberg.net;Brendan Murray in London at brmurray@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Brendan Murray at brmurray@bloomberg.net, Laurence Arnold, Grant ClarkFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Lockheed Martin Wins $328M Deal to Acquire F-35 Components
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    Lockheed Martin Wins $328M Deal to Acquire F-35 Components

    Lockheed Martin (LMT) secures deal to procure long lead material, parts and components for supporting production and delivery of 48 F-35A jets.

  • Lockheed Martin Secures $831M Deal to Support F-35 Program
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    Lockheed Martin Secures $831M Deal to Support F-35 Program

    Lockheed Martin (LMT) wins deal to offer associated red gear in relation to production and delivery of 14 F-35A aircraft.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Mastercard, Adobe, NVIDIA, Lockheed and Estee Lauder
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  • Turkey Begins Testing Missile Radars at Heart of Row With U.S.
    Bloomberg

    Turkey Begins Testing Missile Radars at Heart of Row With U.S.

    (Bloomberg) -- Turkey will test a component of its newly acquired Russian air defense system, a step that risks escalating a dispute with the U.S. and touching off possible sanctions. The lira reversed gains.Military aircraft will be used in the capital Ankara on Monday and Tuesday during the testing of the S-400 system’s radar-detection equipment, a Turkish defense official said, asking not to be identified in line with his department’s restrictions.The decision comes after President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said that he told President Donald Trump during a meeting this month that Turkey wouldn’t give up on deployment of the systems, risking penalties championed in Congress.“What does testing mean? It means they have turned on the thing,” said Cristian Maggio, the head of emerging-market research at TD Securities in London. “So sanctions become an even more concrete possibility. They have always been, but now they may seem possible and imminent.”The two NATO allies have been sparring over the potential risks posed by the purchase to the Pentagon’s costliest weapons program, the F-35 fighter jet built by Lockheed Martin Corp.Top Pentagon officials have repeatedly said Turkey will not be able to continue building components for the F-35 or buy the jet if it continues with its deployment of the S-400. The S-400 system was designed to shoot down U.S. and allied aircraft at greater ranges and altitudes than older missiles. U.S. officials are concerned that sensitive technology in its advanced F-35 fighter plane designed to evade such a system could be compromised and used to improve Russian technology if Turkey has both.“Turkey’s insistence on moving forward with the S-400 is inconsistent with its commitments to NATO and will have impacts on Turkish interoperability with the alliance,” Lieutenant Colonel Carla Gleason, a Pentagon spokeswoman, said in a statement on Monday.Trump said after his Nov. 13 meeting with Erdogan that Turkey’s deal with Moscow presents “some very serious challenges” for the U.S., and directed Secretary of State Michael Pompeo to try to resolve the impasse.The U.S. response to the radar tests will be “crucial” to investor sentiment surrounding Turkish assets, according to Piotr Matys, a strategist at Rabobank in London.“Any indication that Trump’s positive attitude toward Turkey is fading amid growing political pressure from Congress would provide USDTRY with a much stronger upside traction,” Matys said.Fear of such a fallout was already apparent in the lira’s reaction to Monday’s news. The currency fell as much as 0.5% and was trading 0.4% lower at 5.7339 per dollar at 12:27 p.m. in Istanbul. The yield on Turkey’s two-year benchmark notes rose 7 basis points to 11.93% and Istanbul’s benchmark stock exchange swung to losses.(Updates with Pentagon comment in seventh paragraph)\--With assistance from Tugce Ozsoy and Glen Carey.To contact the reporter on this story: Firat Kozok in Ankara at fkozok@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Alaa Shahine at asalha@bloomberg.net, ;Onur Ant at oant@bloomberg.net, ;Riad Hamade at rhamade@bloomberg.net, Amy Teibel, Mark WilliamsFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Raytheon Wins $72M Deal to Support AMRAAM Weapon System
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  • Lockheed (LMT) Up 5.3% Since Last Earnings Report: Can It Continue?
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  • Lockheed Martin Wins Navy Deal to Configure CH-53K Aircraft
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    Lockheed Martin Wins Navy Deal to Configure CH-53K Aircraft

    Lockheed Martin (LMT) will offer configuration changes to support initial operational test and evaluation in relation to the CH-53K helicopter.

  • Bloomberg

    U.S. Approves $1 Billion Sale of Naval Guns to India

    (Bloomberg) -- The U.S government has approved the sale of naval guns worth $1 billion to India in the biggest defense deal between the two countries in four years.Putting the U.S. among the top three global arms suppliers to India, the State Department notified the Congress on Nov. 19 of the possible foreign military sale of as many as 13 naval guns made by the Minneapolis-based BAE Systems Land and Armaments.Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government had made a request to buy the MK 45 naval guns and 3,500 D349 ammunition from the U.S. government, a Defense Security Cooperation Agency notice said.The MK-45 Gun System allows India’s navy to conduct anti­surface warfare and anti-air defense missions, while enhancing interoperability with US and other allied forces.The proposed sale will not alter the basic military balance in the region -- instead it will support the foreign policy and national security of the U.S. by improving the security of a strategic regional partner, the notice said.‘Future Threats’The proposed sale will improve India’s capability to meet current and future threats from enemy weapon systems. India will use the enhanced capability as a deterrent to regional threats and to strengthen its homeland defense.The purchase is part of Modi’s plan to spend $250 billion by 2025 to modernize the armed forces to help meet the twin challenge from neighbors and rivals Pakistan and China. India has fought three major wars with Pakistan and one with China over territorial disputes along its western and northern borders.Since 2007, U.S. has notched up defense deals worth $17 billion with India, competing with traditional arms suppliers Russia and Israel to complete the top three slots.In the 12 years, the U.S. has sold the Boeing Co. C-17 Globemaster long-range transport aircraft, Lockheed Martin C-130 Super Hercules special cargo aircraft, M777 ultra light howitzers, Apache gunship and Chinook cargo helicopters and more to India, which is listed by SIPRI as the second largest arms importer globally in 2018.To contact the reporter on this story: N. C. Bipindra in New Delhi at nbipindra@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Ruth Pollard at rpollard2@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Want To Retire Early? Learn the Intelligent Investing Secret - November 20, 2019
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  • Bloomberg

    Key GOP Senator Warns Erdogan of Sanctions Over Russian Missiles

    (Bloomberg) -- The chairman of the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee warned that if Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan persists in the deployment of a Russian air defense system, he will move ahead with a sanctions bill.“It is his choice, and he knows the consequences,” Jim Risch, an Idaho Republican, said in a statement on Friday evening.Just a day earlier, Risch had said that the Senate should hold off on sanctions over Turkey’s invasion of Syria if Erdogan agreed to give up the S-400 anti-aircraft missile system.“We ought to sit tight, because I think we’re probably going to want to evaluate our position somewhat if indeed we get the S-400s resolved.”On Wednesday, Risch and other Republican senators had a tense exchange with Erdogan as he met with President Donald Trump at the White House. They discussed the missile purchase as well as Turkey’s military campaign against the Kurds in northern Syria.“We brought him to reality in no uncertain terms – from the reality of crippling sanctions on his economy, to our concerns regarding his attack on the Kurds,” Risch, a Trump ally, said in the statement, “and he left that meeting with what we hoped was a different and clear understanding that the Senate remains firm and that keeping the Russian S-400 missiles is a nonstarter.”“Now that Erdogan has gone home, according to news reports, he has stated that not only will he keep S-400s, he will make them operational in a matter of months,” Risch added.“If he is firm in his position,” he said, “I intend to move forward with a Turkey sanctions bill.”The S-400 was designed to shoot down U.S. and allied aircraft at greater ranges and altitudes than older systems. American officials are concerned that sensitive technology in the F-35 fighter plane designed to evade such a system could be compromised and used to improve the S-400 system if Turkey, a NATO member, has both.During a joint press conference with Erdogan on Wednesday, Trump said the purchase of the system presented “some very serious challenges” for the U.S.Some Republicans had expressed uneasiness over the Trump-Erdogan meeting itself, questioning whether a leader who had ordered his armed forces to attack the Kurdish allies of the U.S. in Syria should be rewarded with a White House visit.By law, the Trump administration must sanction Turkey for purchasing the Russian missile-defense system, but the Treasury Department has not yet complied. There are several additional proposals in the House and Senate for extra sanctions as punishment for the invasion of Syria that began last month.The Lockheed Martin Corp. F-35 is a next-generation stealth fighter produced for the U.S. and international allies. Turkey has been a significant contributor to the production of the warplane and was expected to purchase about 100 of the jets before it was expelled from the F-35 program this year over the S-400 episode.\--With assistance from Daniel Flatley and Steven T. Dennis.To contact the reporter on this story: John Harney in Washington at jharney2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Michael Shepard at mshepard7@bloomberg.net, John Harney, Linus ChuaFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Why Lockheed Martin Corporation (NYSE:LMT) Could Be Worth Watching
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    Why Lockheed Martin Corporation (NYSE:LMT) Could Be Worth Watching

    Lockheed Martin Corporation (NYSE:LMT) maintained its current share price over the past couple of month on the NYSE...

  • Bloomberg

    Key Senator Sees Pause in Turkey Sanctions If Erdogan Nixes S-400

    (Bloomberg) -- Senate Foreign Relations Chairman Jim Risch said Thursday the Senate should pause plans to sanction Turkey for its latest invasion of Syria if President Recep Tayyip Erdogan eliminates the Russian S-400 missile defense system from his arsenal.“We think that there’s going to be movement relatively soon on the S-400s,” the Idaho Republican said in an interview the day after meeting with Erdogan at the White House. As long as there is positive movement, Risch said, “we ought to sit tight, because I think we’re probably going to want to evaluate our position somewhat if indeed we get the S-400s resolved.”South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham, a close Trump ally who has pushed the president to take a tougher stance on foreign policy, said Turkey has “weeks, not months” to drop the S-400 program and come to an agreement to end hostilities with the Kurds in northern Syria. If not, “Congress will act,” Graham said.By law, the Trump administration must sanction Turkey for purchasing the Russian missile-defense system, but the Treasury Department has not yet complied. There are several additional proposals in the House and Senate for extra sanctions as punishment for Turkey’s invasion of northern Syria last month. Risch and Graham have both introduced separate bipartisan sanctions bills.Risch said he sees the S-400 issue as separate from concerns for the Kurds, an ethnic minority that partnered with the U.S. in the fight against the Islamic State. Risch said he wants to keep Turkey as an ally.“When you’re going forward, instead of smacking the guy in the nose you need to try to keep moving forward as best you can,” Risch said.Tense MeetingThere was bipartisan outrage over Turkey’s attacks on Kurdish-held parts of Syria after President Donald Trump announced a withdrawal of U.S. troops from the region. That prompted the series of proposals to sanction Turkey’s leaders, military and financial institutions.Graham said the Senate should take up the sanctions bill that already passed the House of Representatives if Turkey doesn’t reverse its behavior.Some of Trump’s fellow Republicans expressed uneasiness over Wednesday’s meeting with Erdogan, questioning whether a leader who attacked the Kurds, a U.S. ally, should be rewarded with a White House meeting. That visit included a tense session with several GOP senators, such as Graham and Risch, who have been leading critics of Turkey’s actions.Risch said senators pressed Erdogan directly on what has been the “painful” recent history of the U.S.-Turkey alliance.Senator Joni Ernst, a Republican from Iowa who was also in the meeting, said there was “a lot of disagreement among the senators and President Erdogan on the S-400 and the Kurds.”She said regardless of the additional sanctions proposals in response to the Syria invasion, if Turkey continues with the Russian missile system, the U.S. will have no choice put to impose the penalties under the 2017 Countering America’s Adversaries Through Sanctions Act.“We have to follow the law,” Ernst said. “We are giving Turkey the opportunity to back off the S-400. The president laid a number of options down for it, and President Erdogan needs to make a choice.”Both SystemsThe Lockheed Martin Corp. F-35 is a next-generation stealth fighter produced for the U.S. and key international allies. Turkey has been a significant contributor to the production of the fighter and was expected to purchase about 100 of the jets before it was expelled from the F-35 program this year over its purchase of the S-400.The Russian missile defense system was designed to shoot down U.S. and allied aircraft at greater ranges and altitudes than older systems. U.S. officials are concerned that sensitive technology in the F-35 designed to evade such a system could be compromised and used to improve the Russian air defense system if Turkey, a NATO member, has both.Risch said he personally warned Erdogan against the S-400 purchase, and told him that under U.S. law he, as the Senate Foreign Relations chairman, has to sign off on any military materials that leave the U.S.“I’m not going to sign off on the F-35 so long as they have the S-400 missiles. I’ve been telling them that for about a year. I think they didn’t really believe us,” Risch said. “I think he just wasn’t accepting that answer, but after yesterday he clearly knows where we stand.”Understanding the Feuds Plaguing U.S.-Turkey Alliance: QuickTakeErdogan, however, told reporters the country cannot discard the S-400 system in favor of U.S. Patriot missiles, but said he told Trump “we’re ready to buy Patriots” as well.Erdogan offered to set up a bilateral group to resolve the issue, which would include his spokesman Ibrahim Kalin and U.S. National Security Advisor Robert O’Brien.Senate Armed Services Chairman Jim Inhofe separately pushed back on Erdogan’s apparent suggestion that he could have both the S-400 and the Patriot systems.“I would want to join on anything that could be emphatically opposing what he’s suggesting,” Inhofe said in an interview. “Just, no holds barred.”Texas Republican Ted Cruz agrees that Turkey cannot have both systems, according to his spokeswoman, Maria Jeffrey.“Senator Cruz has said publicly and he made it very clear privately, that Turkey can have the S-400 or they can have the F-35,” Jeffrey said of the meeting with Erdogan. “That’s a nonstarter.”Attacks on Kurdish AlliesRisch said he is much more optimistic about resolving the S-400 issue than he is about addressing Turkey’s invasion of Kurdish-held territory in Syria. He said Erdogan, in the White House meeting, showed senators a video of Kurdish terrorist attacks.“His point, that they do suffer from terrorist attacks, is well taken,” Risch said, noting that the Turks and the Kurds have long had strained ties. “But obviously not every Kurd is a terrorist.”Risch called talk of working out a “safe zone” and separating Kurdish and Turkish forces “a work in progress.”Risch also said increased violence by Turkish troops in northern Syria could ramp up pressure for sanctions.“This thing didn’t have to go much further south before there was complete breakage” of the U.S.-Turkey relationship, Risch said.(Updates with additional lawmaker comment beginning in third paragraph)\--With assistance from Firat Kozok.To contact the reporters on this story: Steven T. Dennis in Washington at sdennis17@bloomberg.net;Daniel Flatley in Washington at dflatley1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Kevin Whitelaw at kwhitelaw@bloomberg.net, Laurie Asséo, Anna EdgertonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.