LMT - Lockheed Martin Corporation

NYSE - NYSE Delayed price. Currency in USD
437.85
+3.15 (+0.72%)
At close: 4:05PM EST
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Previous close434.70
Open434.98
Bid437.80 x 1200
Ask438.74 x 1100
Day's range434.31 - 438.47
52-week range292.53 - 442.53
Volume948,768
Avg. volume1,091,837
Market cap123.446B
Beta (5Y monthly)0.93
PE ratio (TTM)19.95
EPS (TTM)21.95
Earnings date20 Apr 2020 - 26 Apr 2020
Forward dividend & yield9.60 (2.21%)
Ex-dividend date27 Feb 2020
1y target est461.22
  • Why Lockheed Martin (LMT) is a Top Dividend Stock for Your Portfolio
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    Why Lockheed Martin (LMT) is a Top Dividend Stock for Your Portfolio

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  • Funding Crunch Leaves Modi’s Military Purchases a Pipe Dream
    Bloomberg

    Funding Crunch Leaves Modi’s Military Purchases a Pipe Dream

    (Bloomberg) -- Global companies from Lockheed Martin to Sweden’s Saab AB are offering military hardware from submarines to helicopters to Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government as part of his $250 billion defense modernization program. But bureaucratic delays and a funding crunch has made future deals next to impossible.Airbus SE won a $1.7 billion contract to supply transport planes to the Indian Air Force in 2015 -- it’s first military agreement in the South Asian nation since 1962. Five years later, that deal is yet to be signed.India’s inability to speed up the modernization of its weaponry to guard the border with arch rivals Pakistan and China shows the Modi-led administration’s challenge to transform an industry plagued by red tape. While New Delhi is the world’s fourth-biggest military spender, its air force, navy and the army are still equipped with weapons that are largely obsolete.“The defense procurement procedure needs major, thorough reforms, not just an update,” said Jon Grevatt, the Asia-Pacific defense industry analyst with Jane’s, adding the complex approval processes and lack of finances are the main drag on military modernization. “Unless the Modi government really introduces major reforms into its procurement process then we will continue see delays.”No OrdersAn air of despondency hung over the gathering of top arms manufacturers last week in Lucknow, a nineteenth century battleground city in northern India. Executives heard Modi and Defense Minister Rajnath Singh extolling the need to modernize, collaborate and export out of India, while remaining silent on future orders.A historic mandate about six years ago handed Modi a unique opportunity to aggressively buy arms, without fearing the political opposition that often derails such purchases. But implementation has been poor. The prime minister has missed that window of opportunity, at least seven executives said, asking not to be identified as they still do business with the government.A Defense Ministry spokesman wasn’t immediately available to comment.About 60% of defense spending goes to paying salaries for India’s 1.3 million soldiers -- one of the world’s largest standing armies. What’s left is spent on past purchases, leaving the forces with obsolete equipment and not enough ammunition.India’s spending in the year starting April 1 will be $47.34 billion, of which $16.2 billion is for capital expenditure and of that, about 90% is devoted to existing obligations and committed liabilities. That leaves little to meet demands for weapons purchases and modernization.Time LagThe political leadership is well aware of the need for modern weapons. The mainstay for Indian Army’s artillery are the Swedish-designed Bofors guns bought in the 1980s, while the air force and navy have an aging fleet of Soviet-era aircraft and warships.The process to buy fighter jets started more than a decade ago. When talks stalled over price and quality guarantees, the government scrapped the purchase of 126 fighter jets in 2015 and instead bought 36 Rafale jets separately. In 2018, it began the process to buy another 114 aircraft.Aiming to develop a robust military industrial base, Modi’s government has revised defense procurement procedures, pushed for long-term strategic partnerships between Indian companies and global equipment manufacturers, further eased overseas investment regulations and diversified weapons suppliers.Meanwhile, the U.S. State Department has approved a possible sale to India of an Integrated Air Defense Weapon System, that includes radar systems, missiles and rifles at cost of $1.8 billion, the U.S. Defense Security Cooperation Agency announced Monday. It comes ahead of President Donald Trump’s two-day visit to India starting Feb. 24Still, a parliamentary panel said implementation of the strategic partnership model which envisaged private players building military platforms like submarines and fighter jets in partnership with major global defense companies remains a non-starter. That’s mostly because of a lack of coordination in attracting foreign defense companies to set up local manufacturing, according to the 2018 report.Technology TransferSaab AB pulled out of the race to locally build submarines after it realized it would have to assume all liabilities but wouldn’t have control over the venture. The company, which is pitching its Gripen jets to the government with billionaire Gautam Adani’s defense business, has now made clear it wants control of the venture if it’s required to transfer state-of-the-art technology to its local partner.During the last three financial years till 2019, 149 capital acquisition contracts were signed and of these, 58 contracts worth about $20 billion were placed with foreign vendors, the defense ministry told parliament in December. These are small ticket items only, the company executives said, not submarines, jets or helicopters. Procurement from Indian vendors also fell to its lowest level in five years to financial year 2019.“We are at least convinced that Saab and also other global original equipment manufacturers would be willing to transfer more technologies to India, if we have majority of control,” said Ola Rignell, chairman and managing director of the Saab India Technologies Pvt. Ltd.(Updates with U.S. announcement in 13th paragraph)To contact the reporters on this story: Anurag Kotoky in New Delhi at akotoky@bloomberg.net;Bibhudatta Pradhan in New Delhi at bpradhan@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Ruth Pollard at rpollard2@bloomberg.net, ;Young-Sam Cho at ycho2@bloomberg.net, Unni KrishnanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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  • Army’s Budget Would Boost Rapid-Response for Asia, Hypersonics
    Bloomberg

    Army’s Budget Would Boost Rapid-Response for Asia, Hypersonics

    (Bloomberg) -- The Army’s proposed $178 billion budget for fiscal 2021 would boost spending to practice rapid deployments in the Pacific, including a 1,000-member force equipped to counter Chinese aggression.Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy said in an interview that the service is engaging in “financial engineering” to reposition from 17 years of wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to the current National Defense Strategy, which emphasizes a renewal of great-power competition with China and Russia.The new unit may be headquartered in Japan with its troops, who will be equipped with hypersonic weapons and electronic and cyber warfare capability, dispersed through the Indo-Pacific region.“The disposition of forces in that side of the world is important,” McCarthy said. “If you want to compete against China, against Russia, you’ve got to be there for longer duration.”The service also wants to spend more on hypersonic weapons and a new radar from Raytheon Co. for the Patriot missile system that’s built with Lockheed Martin Corp., according to McCarthy and budget documents being released Monday.Spending on the Army’s program for hypersonic weapons, which can fly five times the speed of sound, would increase to $821 million from $228 million, with test shots planned for 2022 and fielding in 2023. Some of the new weapons would go to the new “multidomain task force” deployed to the Pacific, McCarthy said.The Army is aiming for a prototype hypersonic missile battery by 2023 that can be put on a C-17 transport plane, he said, “and we’ll send it somewhere.”Upgraded RadarThe budget calls for about $1.1 billion over the next five years for research and an additional $838 million in procurement for the upgraded radar that detects and cues targets for Patriot batteries. Raytheon beat Lockheed for the radar program in October.While the $178 billion Army budget, which includes $25 billion in war spending, is about $2 billion less than approved for this year, the service’s budget proposal continues a shift started in fiscal 2018 -- moving dollars to research, development and prototyping for a new generation of long-range cannons and rockets, vertical-lift aircraft, vehicles, improved navigation and soldier gear.The budget requests $24 billion for procurement, including war spending, down slightly from what Congress appropriated for this year, and $12.7 billion in research, comparable to this year. The Army’s funds to fight Islamic State and train allies would drop to $845 million from $1.2 billion. Spending to train the Afghanistan Security Force would be $4 billion, or $200 million less than this year.Shift to R&DMcCarthy said the five-year plan in the current budget shifted $30 billion toward research and development over the five years ending in fiscal 2024. The money would be gleaned from 186 program terminations and truncations.The proposed budget would shift an additional $9 billion toward R&D for fiscal 2023 through 2025. Increased spending would be focused on modernization priorities including advanced helicopters, missiles, air defense and enhanced “soldier lethality.”“We got the herd moving” in the right direction, McCarthy said.The nonpartisan Congressional Research Service raised caveats Friday about the Army’s plans based on current budgets.Some lawmakers may question whether the modernization plan is realistic considering “the Army’s somewhat optimistic assumptions about the budget, demand for forces, mature research and development and the pace of adversary modernization, as well as the scope and complexity of overall Army Modernization,” authors Andrew Feickert and Brendan McGarry said.Cuts, CancellationsThe $9 billion shift in the latest proposed five-year budget includes about $5.3 billion gained from terminating or reducing 10 programs. They include about $1.3 billion in additional reductions to the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle built by Oshkosh Corp.; $1.2 billion from canceling a new “mobile intermediate-range missile” and $400 million from ending work on a helicopter rocket system from BAE Systems Plc.The theory is that seeding programs in development now will give their technologies longer time to mature and offer the Army a variety to choose from in future years. Eight priorities set out by the Army would be increased to $63.7 billion through 2025, up from $54.7 billion in the current five-year plan. They include:$16 billion for the Next Generation Combat Vehicle, up from $15.5 billion in this year’s plan;$13.1 billion for communications networks, up from $11.8 billion.$10.6 billion for air and missile defense, up from $9.2 billion.$8.2 billion for Long Range Precision Fires missiles, up from $5.5 billion.$6.9 billion for Future Vertical Lift, up from $5.1 billion.$1.9 billion for Assured Precision Navigation and Timing, up from $1 billion.For fiscal 2021 alone, the Army is requesting $10.6 billion for the eight core areas or about $2.2 billion more than this year’s budget. One of the most closely watched areas is funding for the next generation of attack and reconnaissance helicopters -- $1.1 billion for fiscal 2021, up from $810 million this year.The $30 billion in reductions to bolster R&D spending was the product of “night court” sessions led by McCarthy’s predecessor, Mark Esper -- now the defense secretary -- that cut, terminated or truncated 186 programs, including Boeing Co.’s CH-47 F-model Chinook helicopter.But the Chinook initiative was previously rejected by Congress, which approved $28 million to keep the model funded after heavy lobbying by lawmakers from Pennsylvania, where the helicopter is built, and New Jersey and Delaware, where many workers live.Undaunted, the Army once again proposes ending funding for the Chinook. But Ryan said he doesn’t expect the new budget to generate as much drama in Congress as did this year’s.“Hard choices are ahead of us -- much harder,” he said. “This budget, quite frankly, is going to be easier than ‘22 and ‘23 because there’s going to be some ruthless” decisions to be made about which prototypes the Army will select to buy, reduce or cancel, he said.To contact the reporter on this story: Tony Capaccio in Washington at acapaccio@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Bill Faries at wfaries@bloomberg.net, Larry LiebertFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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  • Macron Seeks Poland Reset as Warsaw Tightens Grip on Courts
    Bloomberg

    Macron Seeks Poland Reset as Warsaw Tightens Grip on Courts

    (Bloomberg) -- Emmanuel Macron struck a conciliatory tone in a bid to rekindle France’s relationship with Poland.In the first visit to Warsaw by a French head of state in six years, he’s seeking to mend relations strained by his criticism of Poland’s controversial overhaul of the judiciary and its rejection of a deal with Airbus in 2016.After meeting his counterpart Andrzej Duda on Monday, Macron said he wants to move on from “misunderstandings” in the past, though stressed concerns remain about the rule of law.“I mentioned with president Duda, in all frankness since we are partners in Europe, the worries that arise from the ongoing justice reforms,” he said. “I hope that dialogue with the European Commission will intensify in the coming weeks because I know the values of freedom and justice are anchored in Poland.”Macron’s attempt to patch over strains with the European Union’s biggest ex-communist member is central to his plans to strengthen the bloc after the U.K.’s departure and as Germany’s role as the main engine of EU integration fades.He’s committed to visit every EU leader to beef up engagement with the union, including political “frenemies” like Hungary’s Viktor Orban.Not ‘Pro-Russian’But Macron has also extended an olive branch to the Kremlin while making strongly worded comments on the limits of NATO, which Poland sees as its main defense from potential aggression from its Cold-War master Russia.France hasn’t become “pro-Russian,” Macron said Monday.While Poland and France agree on areas including the need for a digital tax, a European car-battery industry and fighting tax fraud, there are also major differences.Poland’s reluctance toward the bloc’s climate-change and migration policies weigh on the relationship. Macron has said Poland shouldn’t access EU climate-transition funds until it explicitly backs the bloc’s emissions-cutting goals. Telling pro-environment activists to go demonstrate in Poland rather than France also didn’t go down well.Constitutional CrisisDefense is another sticking point. Poland’s confirmation it will purchase 32 F-15 aircraft from U.S. manufacturer Lockheed Martin is another blow to Macron’s push for European defense cooperation underpinned by EU-made equipment. Poland enraged the French in 2016 by handing a $3.5 billion helicopter deal to Lockheed despite having an outline agreement with Airbus.The most difficult topic for Macron may be Poland’s deep constitutional crisis, as top courts remain locked in a clash over the validity of the government’s sweeping overhaul of the judiciary.The EU is increasingly fed up with Warsaw for its drive to politicize the courts and is considering tying EU funds to members’ adherence to democratic standards. That may potentially deal a painful blow to the biggest net recipient of financial aid from the bloc.Nevertheless, the tone on Monday was softer.“I strongly believe this visit will be a breakthrough,” Polish President Duda said. “It’s a historic moment, we just had Brexit, France is now an even stronger European superpower, and President Macron’s visit here is a strong signal of French interest in the region.”(Updates with Macron, Duda comments starting in fourth paragraph.)To contact the reporters on this story: Ania Nussbaum in Paris at anianussbaum@bloomberg.net;Marek Strzelecki in Warsaw at mstrzelecki1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Balazs Penz at bpenz@bloomberg.net, Richard Bravo, Andrew LangleyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Air Industries (AIRI) to Post Q4 Earnings: What's in Store?
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    Air Industries (AIRI) to Post Q4 Earnings: What's in Store?

    Air Industries' (AIRI) revenues are likely to have witnessed a boost in the fourth quarter on increased demand for structural parts and components.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Apple, PetroChina, Lockheed Martin, Morgan Stanley and Square
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  • Want To Retire Early? Learn the Intelligent Investing Secret - January 31, 2020
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  • Lockheed Martin (LMT) is a Top Dividend Stock Right Now: Should You Buy?
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