JWN - Nordstrom, Inc.

NYSE - NYSE Delayed price. Currency in USD
36.80
-2.17 (-5.57%)
At close: 4:03PM EST

36.75 -0.05 (-0.14%)
After hours: 6:25PM EST

Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close38.97
Open39.23
Bid36.75 x 800
Ask38.00 x 1000
Day's range36.03 - 39.23
52-week range25.01 - 48.87
Volume5,139,579
Avg. volume2,591,298
Market cap5.713B
Beta (5Y monthly)0.68
PE ratio (TTM)10.58
EPS (TTM)3.48
Earnings date02 Mar 2020
Forward dividend & yield1.48 (3.80%)
Ex-dividend date26 Nov 2019
1y target est37.89
  • Nordstrom (JWN) Reports Next Week: What to Expect
    Zacks

    Nordstrom (JWN) Reports Next Week: What to Expect

    Nordstrom (JWN) doesn't possess the right combination of the two key ingredients for a likely earnings beat in its upcoming report. Get prepared with the key expectations.

  • Bloomberg

    Nordstrom Bets on Used Clothes, But the Market Is a Bit Threadbare

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Nordstrom Inc.’s seven-story New York flagship at Broadway and 57th Street is home to a velvet-lined Nike boutique, a facial massage studio, a martini bar in the heart of the shoe floor and lots of expensive new merchandise. That’s how it’s always been at Nordstrom. But last month brought something new with the opening of See You Tomorrow, a luxury apparel resale boutique inside the flagship. Shoppers will find returned and damaged goods sourced from other Nordstrom stores and — because it’s a resale shop — they’re welcome to sell their own high-end apparel for store credit.Nordstrom isn’t the first department store to try resale. In 2019, Macy’s Inc. and J.C.Penney Co. Inc. preceded Nordstrom into the business, lured by younger shoppers concerned with the environmental footprint of their consumption. But long term, resale’s biggest impact on retailing won’t be the growing sections of department stores devoted to used clothes. The most profound shift will be if manufacturers are compelled to make better quality, more durable clothes that consumers perceive as having value in the secondhand economy.Consumers have complained about the declining quality and durability of clothing for decades. But the complaints became louder and more serious as (primarily) Asian manufacturers became adept at quickly meeting consumer demand for low-cost versions of the latest trends. To do so, the manufacturers skimp on quality. For example, they’ll reduce thread counts, making garments more flimsy and less likely to survive multiple wears and washes. Those low-quality garments have no market in resale shops or on resale apps. And the stuff that can’t be resold or recycled is growing faster than the stuff that can. Between 2003 and 2017, the amount of apparel sold globally nearly doubled, while the number of times a garment was worn dropped by more than a third. All that unworn and ultimately unwanted apparel piles up: In 2017, 14.3 million tons of textiles were landfilled or incinerated in the U.S. — a 623% increase over 1970.These facts are increasingly well-known to American consumers, many of whom say they want to buy purpose-driven, sustainable brands. According to ThredUp Inc., a major online fashion resale platform and the primary source for the resale industry’s data, 59% of consumers expect retailers to create clothes ethically and sustainably. It’s impossible to objectively judge how many retailers meet that expectation. More likely than not, it’s a small number and they charge premium prices. So, in the absence of certainty and a willingness to spend, increasing numbers of consumers are opting for a secondhand retail experience. According to ThredUp’s data, the secondhand apparel market — everything from thrift stores to Nordstrom to ThredUp itself — more than doubled between 2012 and 2018, to $24 billion, and should exceed the fast fashion market by 2028. That expansion is being driven across demographics, but especially among those 18-24, 37% of whom said they would buy secondhand in 2019.However, all of this growth is theoretically constrained by two supply bottlenecks. First, consumers need incentives to sell stuff from their own closets. Second, there needs to be enough decent apparel worth selling to keep the market going. The first problem has largely been solved by online platforms like ThredUp and PoshMark Inc., which enable selling (and buying) through intuitive apps.Historically, the second question has been solved by the market. For example, the resale value of a new car is such a crucial consideration for buyers that automakers advertise how well their models retain it — and manufacture accordingly. Today, 40% of consumers say, according to the ThredUp report, that they incorporate resale value into their purchasing decisions beyond just cars, to include items like furniture to apparel. That’s a major shift in consumer behavior.Last year, Ikea announced a rental program that — among other benefits — is giving the cheap flat-pack furniture maker insights into wear and tear. It’s incorporating that information back into its designs, so items can be sold or rented, over and over again. Similarly, clothing rental juggernaut Rent the Runway Inc. shares its data with designers so that they can learn from it. One fashion label executive summarized the findings as: “How many times do our dresses get dry-cleaned and still come back as new?” The answer won’t only affect Rent the Runway. Last month, Nordstrom announced that it would begin selling garments pulled from Rent the Runway circulation at its discount Nordstrom Rack stores. Presumably, they’ll be able to last a few more dry cleans.Of course, shoppers at Nordstrom’s New York flagship can take resale value for granted. But the mere fact that Nordstrom is offering the option to sell back apparel in the same store from which it was purchased marks a profound shift in how consumers, retailers and manufacturers will perceive shopping and ownership. In coming years, that shift should result in better quality stuff for everyone.To contact the author of this story: Adam Minter at aminter@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Stacey Shick at sshick@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Adam Minter is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist. He is the author of “Junkyard Planet: Travels in the Billion-Dollar Trash Trade” and the forthcoming "Secondhand: Travels in the New Global Garage Sale."For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Why Nordstrom, Inc. (NYSE:JWN) Looks Like A Quality Company
    Simply Wall St.

    Why Nordstrom, Inc. (NYSE:JWN) Looks Like A Quality Company

    While some investors are already well versed in financial metrics (hat tip), this article is for those who would like...

  • Is Macy’s Too Macy’s to Save Macy’s?
    Bloomberg

    Is Macy’s Too Macy’s to Save Macy’s?

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- With the traditional department store in its death throes, Macy’s Inc. is doing its best to keep the concept alive.The struggling retailer late Tuesday unveiled a strategic blueprint to defend its business against the twin threats of online and discount competitors. The centerpiece is closing 125 of its department stores — almost a quarter of the total — over the next three years, including some 30 locations it previously targeted for shuttering last month. These are the so-called “neighborhood stores,” leftovers that Macy’s was reluctant to close sooner. It should have, but at least it’s getting to grips with it now.Alongside the closures, Macy’s is also cutting about 2,000 corporate jobs, and shutting offices in San Francisco and Cincinnati, in an effort to save $1.5 billion a year by the end of 2022.But no one ever cut their way to growth.While taking an ax to the store estate was badly needed — and with department stores under so much pressure, costs probably needed to be reined in, too — Macy’s must ensure that what is left of its estate is compelling. Having the right products, at prices that customers are prepared to pay, and in settings that appeal, is crucial.In that regard, the decision to accelerate store renovations is encouraging. Since 2018, about 150 locations have been given a face-lift. A further 100 will be rejuvenated this year, with around 400 stores refurbished by the end of 2022.Plans to invest in building four $1 billion “power” private-label brands are also welcome. These not only offer merchandise that can’t be found elsewhere, giving customers a reason to visit stores, but exclusive items are more difficult to compare with products available in other stores or online, such as at Amazon.com Inc. That should help Macy’s wean itself off of its discounting, something that is also badly needed if the strategy is to work.New store concept Market by Macy’s also has potential. This paves the way for smaller units, in local shopping centers. At the same time, the group will also keep expanding its off-price  locations.To really make a difference, these initiatives must be put into practice effectively. Transforming private-label offerings into brands with a personality and value in their own right is notoriously difficult. And the Market stores can’t just be mini-Macy’s. They must have the sorts of products that will appeal to customers, particularly younger ones, as well as plenty of experiences to brighten the shopping trip. The stores also must serve as hubs for collecting and returning online orders. At least Macy’s will have the cost savings — and proceeds from monetizing its real estate, for example, developing above stores or on car parks — to invest in these concepts.Some of the group’s efforts are already paying off.  The 150 store refurbishments, for example, helped the Macy’s deliver better-than-expected holidays sales.But it’s not clear that even this latest overhaul — which also includes enhancing Macy’s loyalty program and staying focused on digital —  will be enough to contend with Amazon, which goes from strength to strength.  Target Corp., meanwhile, is already a private label powerhouse, and Nordstrom Inc.  is further down the line with small-format stores.Indeed, it looks like Macy’s is trying to emulate elements of both Target’s and Nordstrom’s strategies when coming up with its own. It deserves credit for tackling the plethora of challenges it faces, and not just allowing itself to become retail apocalypse roadkill. But to really ensure it has a future, it needs to lead, not just follow.  To contact the author of this story: Andrea Felsted at afelsted@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Will Higher Revenues Drive Skechers' (SKX) Q4 Earnings?
    Zacks

    Will Higher Revenues Drive Skechers' (SKX) Q4 Earnings?

    Skechers' (SKX) focus on new lines of products, cost-containment efforts, inventory management and global distribution platform is likely to show on fourth-quarter performance.

  • Tapestry (TPR) to Report Q2 Earnings: What Awaits the Stock?
    Zacks

    Tapestry (TPR) to Report Q2 Earnings: What Awaits the Stock?

    Unfavorable currency movements, soft margins and weakness in Kate Spade brand are likely to have impacted Tapestry's (TPR) Q2 results. Management expects high-single-digit decline in Kate Spade comps.

  • Will Nordstrom (JWN) Beat Estimates Again in Its Next Earnings Report?
    Zacks

    Will Nordstrom (JWN) Beat Estimates Again in Its Next Earnings Report?

    Nordstrom (JWN) has an impressive earnings surprise history and currently possesses the right combination of the two key ingredients for a likely beat in its next quarterly report.

  • Factors to Know Ahead of Capri Holdings' (CPRI) Q3 Earnings
    Zacks

    Factors to Know Ahead of Capri Holdings' (CPRI) Q3 Earnings

    Capri Holdings (CPRI) expects low single digit increase in comparable store sales but lower operating margin at Michael Kors in the third quarter.

  • Levi's beats quarterly earnings estimates; CFO says China still a growth market
    Yahoo Finance

    Levi's beats quarterly earnings estimates; CFO says China still a growth market

    Levi's reports fourth quarter 2019 earnings. Yahoo Finance catches up with Levi's CFO Harmit Singh.

  • Nordstrom is Rallying Ahead of Industry: Factors at Play
    Zacks

    Nordstrom is Rallying Ahead of Industry: Factors at Play

    Nordstrom's (JWN) robust omni-channel expansion efforts and customer strategy should continue driving its performance.

  • Retail-Apparel & Shoes Industry Outlook: Prospects Bright
    Zacks

    Retail-Apparel & Shoes Industry Outlook: Prospects Bright

    Retail-Apparel & Shoes Industry Outlook: Prospects Bright

  • Helen of Troy Adds Drybar Products to Leadership Brands Kitty
    Zacks

    Helen of Troy Adds Drybar Products to Leadership Brands Kitty

    Helen of Troy (HELE) completes the acquisition of Drybar Products LLC for roughly $255 million. This is likely to strengthen its Beauty business.

  • JWN vs. BHOOY: Which Stock Is the Better Value Option?
    Zacks

    JWN vs. BHOOY: Which Stock Is the Better Value Option?

    JWN vs. BHOOY: Which Stock Is the Better Value Option?

  • Foot Locker Declines 12% in 3 Months: Can the Stock Rebound?
    Zacks

    Foot Locker Declines 12% in 3 Months: Can the Stock Rebound?

    Foot Locker's (FL) soft fourth-quarter fiscal 2019 view is hurting investors' sentiments. Nevertheless, its focus on expanding international and digital platforms might aid performance.

  • Should Value Investors Consider Nordstrom (JWN) Stock Now?
    Zacks

    Should Value Investors Consider Nordstrom (JWN) Stock Now?

    Let's see if Nordstrom (JWN) stock is a good choice for value-oriented investors right now from multiple angles.

  • As shares fall below $1, it 'might be too late' for JC Penney to turn around
    Yahoo Finance

    As shares fall below $1, it 'might be too late' for JC Penney to turn around

    Shares of JC Penney closed below $1 recently, and if the stock continues to close below $1 for 30 days it risks being delisted by the NYSE.

  • Zacks.com featured highlights include: Nordstrom, M/I Homes, American Airlines, Covenant Transportation and AmerisourceBergen
    Zacks

    Zacks.com featured highlights include: Nordstrom, M/I Homes, American Airlines, Covenant Transportation and AmerisourceBergen

    Zacks.com featured highlights include: Nordstrom, M/I Homes, American Airlines, Covenant Transportation and AmerisourceBergen

  • 5 Broker-Friendly Stocks in Focus Amid Middle East Tensions
    Zacks

    5 Broker-Friendly Stocks in Focus Amid Middle East Tensions

    It is in the best interest of investors to seek advice from brokers, who are deemed to be experts in the field of investing.

  • Why 'zombie' retailers are taking so long to die
    Yahoo Finance

    Why 'zombie' retailers are taking so long to die

    Retailers closed more than 9,000 stores last year and news that Pier 1 will close 450 this year signals more trouble for traditional retailers this year.

  • JWN vs. BHOOY: Which Stock Should Value Investors Buy Now?
    Zacks

    JWN vs. BHOOY: Which Stock Should Value Investors Buy Now?

    JWN vs. BHOOY: Which Stock Is the Better Value Option?

  • Nordstrom (JWN) Up 25% in 6 Months: Will the Rally Continue?
    Zacks

    Nordstrom (JWN) Up 25% in 6 Months: Will the Rally Continue?

    Nordstrom's (JWN) consistent efforts toward omni-channel expansion and customer-based strategy position it well for growth.

  • Here's Why Abercrombie Offers a Balanced Risk-Reward Now
    Zacks

    Here's Why Abercrombie Offers a Balanced Risk-Reward Now

    Abercrombie (ANF) is well-positioned to gain from its transformation initiatives. However, tariff and currency-related headwinds might cloud its growth potential.

  • Is Nordstrom, Inc. (NYSE:JWN) An Attractive Dividend Stock?
    Simply Wall St.

    Is Nordstrom, Inc. (NYSE:JWN) An Attractive Dividend Stock?

    Is Nordstrom, Inc. (NYSE:JWN) a good dividend stock? How can we tell? Dividend paying companies with growing earnings...

  • Why Soaring Target (TGT) Stock is a Strong Buy for 2020
    Zacks

    Why Soaring Target (TGT) Stock is a Strong Buy for 2020

    Target shares have soared 95% in 2019, as Wall Street and investors show their love for the retailer's e-commerce strength and more. And TGT stock looks like a strong buy heading into 2020...