IBM - International Business Machines Corporation

NYSE - NYSE Delayed price. Currency in USD
119.70
+1.16 (+0.98%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close118.54
Open119.69
Bid0.00 x 800
Ask0.00 x 800
Day's range119.26 - 121.42
52-week range90.56 - 158.75
Volume3,746,958
Avg. volume5,419,303
Market cap106.281B
Beta (5Y monthly)1.23
PE ratio (TTM)11.86
EPS (TTM)10.10
Earnings date20 Jul 2020
Forward dividend & yield6.52 (5.45%)
Ex-dividend date07 May 2020
1y target est127.29
  • 3 High-Yield Tech Stocks to Buy in July
    Motley Fool

    3 High-Yield Tech Stocks to Buy in July

    These tech stocks will reward investors with stable growth and strong dividends for many years to come.

  • 5 High-Yield Dividend Stocks to Watch
    Motley Fool

    5 High-Yield Dividend Stocks to Watch

    One of the places they've found cash returns is in dividend stocks, particularly those that offer a relatively high payout. Fortunately, some high-yield dividend stocks remain well-positioned to sustain their dividends. AbbVie (NYSE: ABBV) spent most of its history as a subsidiary of Abbott Laboratories before becoming an independent company in 2013.

  • IBM Public Cloud to Accelerate Daimler's Digital Overhaul
    Zacks

    IBM Public Cloud to Accelerate Daimler's Digital Overhaul

    IBM's public cloud gets adopted by Daimler to drive digital transformation journey and enhance business operations with robust security capabilities.

  • IBM Expands Cloud to Daimler
    Bloomberg

    IBM Expands Cloud to Daimler

    Jul.01 -- IBM Cloud Senior Vice President Howard Boville explains IBM's cloud expansion to Daimler. He speaks with Caroline Hyde on "Bloomberg Markets."

  • 'We're seeing a 6,000% increase in spam': IBM cyber VP
    Yahoo Finance

    'We're seeing a 6,000% increase in spam': IBM cyber VP

    Spam has seen a huge surge as well as data breaches, according to a securiity team at IBM. One of the biggest attacks right now? Going after vaccine and testing intellectual property.

  • HP CEO: 'We are a purpose driven brand'
    Yahoo Finance

    HP CEO: 'We are a purpose driven brand'

    HP CEO Enrique Lores chats with Yahoo Finance about diversity and the future of the PC and printer maker.

  • Add 4 Stocks to Watchlist on Evolving Use Cases of Blockchain
    Zacks

    Add 4 Stocks to Watchlist on Evolving Use Cases of Blockchain

    Democratization of blockchain is poised to hit new high with coronavirus crisis induced demand of offerings based on the next-gen technology.

  • BLM Movement Pushes Tech Bigwigs to Enhance Racial Inclusion
    Zacks

    BLM Movement Pushes Tech Bigwigs to Enhance Racial Inclusion

    The "Black Lives Matter" movement has spurred many tech stalwarts to realize the benefits of inclusion, reevaluate their diversity practices and be more racially inclusive in their approach.

  • Blockchain Will Let You Track Salmon From Sea to Dinner Plate
    Bloomberg

    Blockchain Will Let You Track Salmon From Sea to Dinner Plate

    (Bloomberg) -- Consumers around the world will soon be able to know intricate life details of the salmon they eat with a new blockchain initiative from top exporter Norway.The Norwegian Seafood Association has partnered with International Business Machines Corp. and technology provider Atea ASA to gather data on how salmon is bred, stored and shipped, information that consumers will eventually access by scanning a QR code. That will help Norway’s suppliers differentiate their premium products from other exporters, curb origin fraud and cut waste.“Blockchain lets us share the fish’s journey from the ocean to the dinner table,” said Alf-Goran Knutsen, chief executive officer of Kvaroy Arctic, a supplier that’s part of the initiative. “This is now more timely than ever.”As consumers increasingly want to know what’s in their food and how it’s produced, blockchain has helped retailers ensure products from chicken to pasta aren’t tainted or passed off as something else. But fish has been harder to trace, making it particularly vulnerable to fraud. Advocacy group Oceana has estimated that one in five seafood samples are mislabeled.While Norway has stricter rules than many producers on how it treats salmon, fish farming globally has been mired in controversies from the use of antibiotics to the sustainability of fish feed. Using blockchain to monitor a fish’s life story will help Norway’s producers safeguard their reputation and stop inferior products being faked as Norwegian, according to Espen Braathe, an executive at IBM Food Trust Europe.“When you sell a fresh, clean product, it’s really important you produce as much evidence as possible,” Braathe said in an interview.The project, the first to cover the entire salmon supply chain, will go live by the end of September and will also monitor trout. Sensors and cameras will record details such as water temperature and what the fish are fed, Atea CEO Steinar Sonsteby said.The initiative, which will later expand to wild catches, should allow Norwegian farmers to obtain higher prices for their fish, said Robert Eriksson, CEO of the Norwegian Seafood Association. The target is for each member to trace as much as 40% of their fish population by 2025, according to IBM.Concerns over the link between food and recent coronavirus cases in China shows how blockchain could ease such worries, Sonsteby said. The new outbreak had been blamed on imported salmon, and fears over whether food can transmit viruses had led salmon to be boycotted in China, even though experts said there’s no evidence the fish was the origin or intermediate host.“It really exemplifies very well how a solution like this could work to introduce trust into the value chain and the industry,” Sonsteby said. For retailers in general, “they want to be 100% sure that what they are buying and selling on is something that they can be 100% behind.”For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Influencers with Andy Serwer: Steve Ballmer
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Influencers with Andy Serwer: Steve Ballmer

    In this episode of Influencers, Andy speaks with LA Clippers Chairman and former Microsoft CEO, Steve Ballmer, to discuss the return of the NBA season, the coronavirus effect on the tech sector, and Steve's fact-finding endeavor at USAFacts.

  • IBM & SAP Team Up to Drive Digital Overhaul of Enterprises
    Zacks

    IBM & SAP Team Up to Drive Digital Overhaul of Enterprises

    International Business Machines Corporation (IBM) and SAP expand partnership in a bid to aid enterprises accelerate business processes and power their digital transformation journey.

  • Microsoft (MSFT) Takes Initiatives to Curb Racial Inequity
    Zacks

    Microsoft (MSFT) Takes Initiatives to Curb Racial Inequity

    Microsoft (MSFT) aims to address racial inequity in the United States with its multiyear commitments and additional $150 million investment to boost diversity and inclusion.

  • IBM (IBM) Stock Sinks As Market Gains: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    IBM (IBM) Stock Sinks As Market Gains: What You Should Know

    In the latest trading session, IBM (IBM) closed at $119.41, marking a -1.37% move from the previous day.

  • COVID-19 quarantines gave hackers time to perfect presidential election attacks: tech security CEO
    Yahoo Finance

    COVID-19 quarantines gave hackers time to perfect presidential election attacks: tech security CEO

    Hackers could be gearing up to attack another election, says this tech CEO.

  • Amazon, Microsoft Leave Many Face-Recognition Queries Unanswered
    Bloomberg

    Amazon, Microsoft Leave Many Face-Recognition Queries Unanswered

    (Bloomberg) -- Amazon.com Inc. last week announced a one-year pause in use by police forces of its artificial intelligence software for recognizing faces. The next day, Microsoft Corp. said it doesn’t currently sell its similar product to U.S. police departments and won’t do so until the federal government passes a law regulating its use. Both steps came amid widespread protests against police brutality and misconduct targeted at Black people—a population on whom facial-recognition software performs poorly, leading to concerns that the technology is another vector for discrimination against people of color by law enforcement.Other companies have gone ever further. Earlier last week, International Business Machines Corp. said it would  no longer sell general-purpose facial recognition and analysis software. Google Cloud Platform stopped selling facial recognition as an off-the-shelf service, saying in late 2018 that the company wanted to allow more time to work through “important technology and policy questions.”While Microsoft and Amazon received praise for their steps last week, the complicated nature of technology contracts, and the many different levels and types of law enforcement agencies—foreign and domestic, at local, state and national levels—mean there are still many unanswered questions about what the temporary bans cover and how they will be implemented. Both companies have declined to answer these questions.  How are the companies defining ‘police?’ It’s not clear whether the bans mean just local police departments or also include federal law enforcement officers. On June 17, the American Civil Liberties Union released emails that showed Microsoft tried to sell facial recognition software to the federal Drug Enforcement Administration in 2017 and 2018. Amazon sought to sell its tools to ICE in 2018. Would the companies still try to make such sales in 2020? On June 18 at an event hosted by Politico, Microsoft President Brad Smith said the company doesn’t currently have any federal law enforcement customers. He said the company wouldn’t sell to federal law enforcement in any “scenario that either leads to bias against people of color or women,” and “won’t allow our technology to be used in any manner that puts people’s fundamental rights at risk,” but he stopped short of ruling out any sales of the technology to federal agencies that take part in many different kinds of policing, such as U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Customs and Border Protection and others.What about overseas police departments and international police or investigative organizations?In announcing Microsoft’s move, Smith specified that it related to U.S. police. Amazon’s two-paragraph blog post announcing its moratorium, meanwhile, mentioned U.S. Congress. The companies have declined to comment on whether they will or currently sell to organizations outside the U.S. That means they may still be targeting a large group of international customers with software they have found problematic to sell domestically. What’s the extent of the companies’ previous sales of the technology to police departments? Smith said Microsoft doesn’t currently have U.S. police customers, but the company hasn’t released any information on historical buyers. In its customer references, Amazon has touted some of its police clients, including the Washington County Sheriff’s Office in Oregon. It won’t say what happens to those customers during the one-year pause or whether Amazon will automatically turn off access to its face-scanning product, called Rekognition. A Washington County spokesman told the Seattle Times that it will stop using Rekognition during the moratorium, but it’s not clear what happens to others, or how many there are—Amazon Web Services CEO Andy Jassy has said he doesn’t know how many police departments use Rekognition. Without a thorough shut-off of existing customers, usage may persist.If the companies do business with municipal governments, can they truly know if a local police department has access to the software?In some cities, contracting for police tech is done through city offices or municipal chief information officers. In those cases, how would the companies know the software is intended for police use rather than some other local use case the companies permit, such as mapping and scanning local streets or city-owned parking lots? It might be possible for a city to license the product from Microsoft or Amazon and then to let it be used by police or for law enforcement tasks, where the issue of racial disparities in the software could be particularly harmful.What about technology products other than facial-recognition software that can enable police surveillance?Ring, the Amazon-owned doorbell camera maker, runs a program that lets police departments and other law enforcement agencies—some 1,300 and counting—request footage from users. Ring didn’t comment on whether the moratorium on police use of Rekognition would impact those police partnerships. Meanwhile, some privacy advocates say that pledges from Google and IBM to not sell general-purpose facial recognition software leaves the door open to tech-savvy users assembling such a system from other products still available from those companies. Google and IBM didn’t immediately return requests for comment. For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • IBM Expands Partnership With Siemens to Launch New Solution
    Zacks

    IBM Expands Partnership With Siemens to Launch New Solution

    IBM and Siemens' new solution strengthens IBM's asset management capabilities, which bodes well for the company's top-line performance in the coming days.

  • IBM (IBM) Dips More Than Broader Markets: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    IBM (IBM) Dips More Than Broader Markets: What You Should Know

    In the latest trading session, IBM (IBM) closed at $124.15, marking a -0.8% move from the previous day.

  • Microsoft (MSFT) Fortifies Cloud Capacity Amid Rising Demand
    Zacks

    Microsoft (MSFT) Fortifies Cloud Capacity Amid Rising Demand

    Microsoft (MSFT) is expected to benefit from its efforts to boost cloud capacity supported by growing momentum of its cloud offerings.

  • Why Microsoft and Amazon are calling on Congress to regulate facial recognition tech
    Yahoo Finance

    Why Microsoft and Amazon are calling on Congress to regulate facial recognition tech

    Tech giants Amazon and Microsoft are calling for Congress to regulate their facial recognition technologies.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: JNJ, WMT, BAC, IBM and LMT
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: JNJ, WMT, BAC, IBM and LMT

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: JNJ, WMT, BAC, IBM and LMT

  • IBM To Acquire Spanugo
    Motley Fool

    IBM To Acquire Spanugo

    Spanugo expected to enhance IBM's public cloud capabilities to those operating in highly-regulated industries.

  • Amazon (AMZN) to Expand AWS With New Office Plans in Redmond
    Zacks

    Amazon (AMZN) to Expand AWS With New Office Plans in Redmond

    Amazon's (AMZN) latest 111,000-square-foot office space lease in Redmond, WA expands its presence in Puget Sound Region.