HON - Honeywell International Inc.

NYSE - NYSE Delayed price. Currency in USD
144.97
-2.25 (-1.53%)
At close: 4:02PM EDT

144.97 0.00 (0.00%)
After hours: 4:32PM EDT

Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close147.22
Open146.00
Bid144.83 x 800
Ask144.84 x 800
Day's range144.26 - 146.10
52-week range101.08 - 184.06
Volume2,515,383
Avg. volume3,641,246
Market cap101.747B
Beta (5Y monthly)1.06
PE ratio (TTM)16.66
EPS (TTM)8.70
Earnings date16 Jul 2020 - 20 Jul 2020
Forward dividend & yield3.60 (2.45%)
Ex-dividend date14 May 2020
1y target est157.85
  • Why Shares of Honeywell Fell 18% in the First Half of 2020
    Motley Fool

    Why Shares of Honeywell Fell 18% in the First Half of 2020

    Shares of Honeywell International (NYSE: HON) followed the broader markets down as the COVID-19 pandemic swept across the globe earlier this year. The stock lost 18.3% in the first half of 2020, according to data provided by S&P Global Market Intelligence, and the near-term outlook for the company remains hazy at best. Honeywell is a diversified manufacturer, but its biggest profit generator is its commercial aerospace unit.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Shareholder Investigation: The Law Firm of Barbuto & Johansson, P.A. Investigates Honeywell International, Inc. (NYSE: HON) for Potential Breaches of Fiduciary Duty by Board of Directors

    WELLINGTON, Fla., July 02, 2020 -- Barbuto & Johansson, P.A. (“BARJO”) and Of Counsel, Neil Rothstein, Esq. (with over 30 years of Securities Class Action Experience,.

  • HONEYWELL LITIGATION UPDATE by Former Louisiana Attorney General: Kahn Swick & Foti, LLC Moves Forward in Securities Class Action Lawsuit On Behalf of Purchasers of Honeywell International Inc. (HON) between February 9, 2018 through October 19, 2018
    Business Wire

    HONEYWELL LITIGATION UPDATE by Former Louisiana Attorney General: Kahn Swick & Foti, LLC Moves Forward in Securities Class Action Lawsuit On Behalf of Purchasers of Honeywell International Inc. (HON) between February 9, 2018 through October 19, 2018

    Kahn Swick & Foti, LLC ("KSF") and KSF partner, former Attorney General of Louisiana, Charles C. Foti, Jr., announce that the securities class action lawsuit against Honeywell International Inc. (NYSE: HON) led by KSF, on behalf of all persons who purchased or otherwise acquired Honeywell securities from February 9, 2018 through October 19, 2018, continues forward in the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey.

  • Honeywell Stock Falls 3%
    Investing.com

    Honeywell Stock Falls 3%

    Investing.com - Honeywell (NYSE:HON) Stock fell by 3.01% to trade at $138.23 by 15:29 (19:29 GMT) on Friday on the NYSE exchange.

  • Coronavirus Ups Demand for Air Purifiers: 4 Stocks to Watch
    Zacks

    Coronavirus Ups Demand for Air Purifiers: 4 Stocks to Watch

    More consumers are demanding HEPA filters amid the COVID-19 outbreak, thus leading to a significant rise in demand for air purifiers.

  • The Truth About Market Timing - June 23, 2020
    Zacks

    The Truth About Market Timing - June 23, 2020

    In the long-run, does consistent market timing really matter to be a successful investor?

  • PPE Market to Grow on Coronavirus Second Wave: 4 Stocks in Focus
    Zacks

    PPE Market to Grow on Coronavirus Second Wave: 4 Stocks in Focus

    The PPE industry's largest manufacturers are operating at maximum capacity and are aiming to expand their domestic production capacity within the year.

  • Business Wire

    HONEYWELL LITIGATION UPDATE: Securities Class Action Lawsuit Moves Forward On Behalf of Purchasers of Honeywell International Inc. (HON) between February 9, 2018 through October 19, 2018

    ClaimsFiler, a FREE shareholder information service, announces that the securities class action lawsuit against Honeywell International Inc. (NYSE: HON) on behalf of all persons who purchased or otherwise acquired Honeywell securities from February 9, 2018 through October 19, 2018, continues forward in the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey.

  • PPE Market Benefits From Coronavirus Pandemic: 4 Gainers
    Zacks

    PPE Market Benefits From Coronavirus Pandemic: 4 Gainers

    The current scenario has pushed makers of medical gloves, masks and PPE, and producers of wearables alerting on social distancing measures to the forefront. Watch these stocks for a possible uptick ahead.

  • Honeywell (HON) Rolls Out Satellite Communication System
    Zacks

    Honeywell (HON) Rolls Out Satellite Communication System

    Honeywell (HON) introduces satellite communication system, SATCOM, to provide global connectivity and instant video-streaming capabilities to unmanned aerial vehicles.

  • Honeywell (HON) Creates Unit to Serve UAS & UAM Markets
    Zacks

    Honeywell (HON) Creates Unit to Serve UAS & UAM Markets

    Honeywell (HON) creates a business unit, UAS to focus on providing aircraft systems and advanced technology for autonomous aviation markets. It enters a deal with KIPIC.

  • Honeywell Stock Rises 4%
    Investing.com

    Honeywell Stock Rises 4%

    Investing.com - Honeywell (NYSE:HON) Stock rose by 3.69% to trade at $152.13 by 09:45 (13:45 GMT) on Tuesday on the NYSE exchange.

  • Shortage of Safety Supplies Adds to Risks for U.S. Reopening
    Bloomberg

    Shortage of Safety Supplies Adds to Risks for U.S. Reopening

    (Bloomberg) -- First came the dash to equip U.S. hospitals with protective gear when the coronavirus swept across the country. Now companies are scrambling to get a limited supply of masks, gloves and disinfectants they need to reopen.For businesses already struggling from the pandemic, that means further constraints on time and costs. The shortages also present a conundrum as America’s economy restarts: If companies can’t get enough supplies, more people are at risk for the virus, adding to the prospect of another surge in cases that would leave the market even more short of protective equipment.“It’s been challenging,” said Peter Elitzer, president of Peter Harris Clothes, a discount retailer that has reopened almost all of its 79 stores. “How do you find the masks? How do you find the sanitizer? How do you find the wipes? Forget it. To get the Clorox wipes is completely impossible.”Elitzer shelled out $60 a gallon for hand sanitizer before tracking down a distiller that could produce it for $35 -- still triple the usual price. Plastic barriers, masks and thermometers are selling at premiums, he said. The company had to furlough workers just to cover the $50,000 in added expenses.Inventories will remain tight and short-term price spikes are expected for high-demand items as businesses crank back up just as doctors begin performing elective surgeries again, said D.G. Macpherson, chief executive officer of W.W. Grainger Inc., the largest U.S. distributor of industrial supplies. Hospitals also are rebuilding stockpiles ahead of a potential second wave of the virus later this year.“Things are still challenged now in a number of categories,” Macpherson said in an interview. “It’s getting better, I would say. But there’s a long way to go.”As manufacturers scurry to meet demand, bottlenecks are popping up. Honeywell International Inc. crammed a typical nine-month procedure into six weeks to open production sites for N95 masks in Rhode Island and Arizona. The company wants to add more capacity but is bumping up against a lack of the filter material that’s sandwiched between the inner and outer layers.There’s no easy fix because there are only two manufacturers of the machines that produce the material, said Will Lange, chief of Honeywell’s personal protective equipment business.Disposable gloves and hospital gowns are among the items with the biggest kinks in the supply chain, he said. Honeywell is looking to set up U.S. output of hospital gowns after beginning a production line in North Africa. The company doesn’t make gloves but procures them from third-party manufacturers and sells them, a task that’s become difficult after the World Health Organization put in an order for “multiple millions” of them, Lange said.The tight market for those products could become critical if Covid-19 resurges. As it is, cases are accelerating in some states, with Texas and Florida reporting record numbers of new infections. This has led to concerns that reopenings may come at the cost of spreading the virus.“I don’t think the supply chain is ready yet for a second wave of massive demand for PPE,” Lange said. “It’s probably going to take about nine months to get to a really good spot.”Maryam Barnes, an orthodontist in the Dallas suburb of Allen, Texas, said she is paying exorbitant prices for masks, gowns, face shields and other supplies just as the number of patients she’s able to schedule has dropped by half because of social distancing.“Disposable gowns -- those are ridiculous,” Barnes said. They can cost as much as $20 each, whereas it used to be $20 to $30 for boxes of 50, she said.‘Strange’ ActivityThe top concerns among small-business owners are whether customers will return as they reopen and if there will be adequate supplies of hand sanitizer, disinfectants and face coverings, according to a survey in May by the National Federation of Independent Business.The trade group, which represents about 300,000 small businesses, had urged members to begin accumulating those supplies about a month ago in anticipation of the reopening, said Holly Wade, director of research and policy analysis. There’s concern that larger companies with more buying power will have an edge in acquiring essential goods, squeezing small businesses even more on availability.“There’s so much strange business activity that’s happening right now,” Wade said. “Even if they have a supply now, it’s unclear how long those will last and if they’ll be able to restock.”H Town Restaurant Group, which has four locations in the Houston area, stocked up on about six weeks of supplies including masks, gloves and sanitizer and is purchasing more in case a second wave of the virus puts more pressure on the supply chain, said co-owner Tracy Vaught. The group is operating at a loss as it opens its restaurants at limited capacity, and the extra cost of protective gear for her 150 employees doesn’t help.“It’s just what we have to do to be in business,” Vaught said. “It’s not negotiable.”In Albany, New York, Elitzer of Peter Harris Clothes worked from his dining-room table during the lockdown to secure supplies. Locally made face coverings cost $8 apiece before he received a shipment from China at $1.45 each. He negotiated acrylic barriers down to $75 each from a local sign manufacturer, after initially paying as much as $175.Other entrepreneurs are also proving resourceful in finding their own solutions. Steve Trollope, who co-owns a prenatal-imaging center in Reno, Nevada, resorted to making his own hand sanitizer from aloe and Everclear grain alcohol to provide for workers and the patients he attended throughout the pandemic.“Early on, it was a real scramble. We were at the point of getting desperate to locate certain items,” said Trollope, who now can buy sanitizer again. “The supply chain seems to be mending itself.”Grainger expects demand for plastic barriers, masks, disinfectants and other supplies related to Covid-19 to be elevated for the long term. Companies are adopting practices that won’t fade even if the virus eventually does, said Macpherson, the CEO.“For the next few years, we’re going to be in a world where these types of products are going to be the norm for how we work,” he said. “Frankly, when we go into the grocery store, you ask yourself, ‘Why didn’t we always have this? Why did we let people sneeze on each other in the first place?’”(Updates with wave of new cases in 11th paragraph)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Viasat Boosts In-Flight Connectivity With Honeywell Deal
    Zacks

    Viasat Boosts In-Flight Connectivity With Honeywell Deal

    Viasat (VSAT) inks a strategic agreement with Honeywell to strengthen its IFC solutions by adding the avant-garde VR-12T shipset to Honeywell's Maintenance Service Plan for enhanced aviation services.

  • 3 Top Industrial Stocks to Buy Right Now
    Motley Fool

    3 Top Industrial Stocks to Buy Right Now

    Here are three top industrial stocks capable of overcoming setbacks from COVID-19, and growing during an economic recovery. United Parcel Service (NYSE: UPS) is one of the largest and most well-known transportation stocks. The company's global supply chain of integrated services by land, sea, and sky also makes UPS one of the top logistics companies.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Mastercard, Novartis, Boeing Company, Sanofi and Honeywell International
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Mastercard, Novartis, Boeing Company, Sanofi and Honeywell International

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Mastercard, Novartis, Boeing Company, Sanofi and Honeywell International

  • Forget Airline Stocks, Buy Aerospace Suppliers Instead
    Motley Fool

    Forget Airline Stocks, Buy Aerospace Suppliers Instead

    Raytheon Technologies, Honeywell, and Heico are probably safer ways to play a recovery in commercial aviation.

  • Can the U.S. End China’s Control of the Global Supply Chain?
    Bloomberg

    Can the U.S. End China’s Control of the Global Supply Chain?

    (Bloomberg) -- The trade war amplified calls in the U.S. and elsewhere for reducing dependence on China for strategic goods. Now, the pandemic has politicians vowing to take action.The Trump administration has talked about bringing supply chains home from China, and even publicly floated the need for a group of friendly nations in Asia that could help produce essential goods. President Donald Trump last month even said the U.S. would “save $500 billion” if it cut off ties with China.But interviews with nearly a dozen government officials and analysts in the Asia-Pacific region show that any broader effort to restructure supply chains is little more than wishful thinking so far. While governments are pushing to win investments, such as Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co.’s planned state-of-the-art semiconductor factory in the U.S., it won’t be simple to dismantle an entrenched system when many companies are struggling to survive.More likely is that the virus will accelerate a change that was already driven by market forces as rising wages and costs in China over the past decade caused an exodus of lower-value manufacturing, much of it to Southeast Asia. That’s despite the desire from some in the Trump administration to start decoupling the world’s biggest economies as the U.S. and China spar over everything from the virus to 5G networks to Hong Kong.“The rhetoric meets the reality, which is that many firms have supply chains set up the way they do for very sensible reasons,” said Deborah Elms of the Asian Trade Centre, which has seen an increase of companies looking for advice on reorganizing to increase competitiveness. “Coming out of Covid, it’s going to be even harder to move supply chains because your cash flow is low, your staff are working from home or coming slowly back into the office, and the business climate has shifted.”While the world trade network mostly held up well amid rolling lockdowns as Covid-19 spread, the economic cost fueled calls among politicians for greater self-sufficiency and alternatives to China. U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, whose department announced an Economic Security Strategy last year, in April named Australia, New Zealand, Japan, India, and South Korea as countries that the U.S. has been talking to on supply chains.A key plank of the State Department’s new Economic Security Strategy is expanding and diversifying supply chains that protect “people in the free world,” according to Keith Krach, a State Department official who leads efforts to develop international policies related to economic growth.Krach said in April a so-called “Economic Prosperity Network” of like-minded allies would be built for critical products.‘China Plus One’Industries would include pharmaceuticals, medical devices, semiconductors, automotive, aerospace, textiles and chemicals, among others.But the idea right now appears to lack any firm foundation. The State Department doesn’t have jurisdiction over trade, and officials in other Asian countries said no formal talks were taking place. A person close to the administration said Krach is prone to pushing grand ideas publicly that haven’t yet become policy.Still, other governments are moving on their own to shift production away from China -- especially since the Covid disruptions. This includes Taiwan and Japan, which were among the biggest investors in China’s manufacturing capacity in the early days.“Many companies have already begun adopting a ‘China plus one’ manufacturing hub strategy since the U.S.-China trade war began in 2018, with Vietnam having been a clear beneficiary,” said Anwita Basu, head of Asia country risk research at Fitch Solutions. While the pandemic will give that another push, “shifts away from China will be slow as that country still boasts an annual manufacturing output that is so large that even a group of countries would struggle to absorb a fraction of it.”In 2019, Taiwanese officials encouraged the island’s firms to build a “non-red supply chain” outside of China, passing a law that promised rent assistance, cheap finance, tax breaks and simplified administration for investments in Taiwan. The move helped the island’s economy weather the trade war last year and led to more than NT$1 trillion ($33.5 billion) pledged or invested domestically, and more overseas.Japan recently started down the same path, with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s government budgeting about 220 billion yen ($2 billion) for companies shifting production back home and 23.5 billion yen for those seeking to move production to other countries.“Everyone agrees we really have to reconsider the sustainability of supply chains,” Hiroaki Nakanishi, chairman of Hitachi Ltd. and head of Japan’s biggest business lobby Keidanren, said on television last month. “It’s unrealistic to suddenly return all production to Japan. But if we are totally reliant on one specific country and they have a lockdown, there will be huge consequences.”South Korea has similar plans as part of its economic blueprint for the rest of the year, announced earlier this month. The government said it will provide tax incentives, ease investment-related regulations and expand financial support for companies that ‘u-turn.’ Yet, it hasn’t said how much money will be earmarked for the entire support program.For all that, China retains some key advantages. Last year 38% of Taiwan’s $11 billion of overseas investment still went to the mainland, as did 10% of Japan’s -- despite increased investments in Southeast Asia over the past few decades due to periodic bouts of anti-Japanese rioting in China.Young Liu, chairman of Taiwan-based Hon Hai Precision Industry, whose Foxconn unit manufactures iPhone in plants in China, said in mid-May that it’s difficult to move assembly of mobile devices to the U.S due to the sheer number of workers needed.“China remains unmatched as a manufacturing site given its numbers of skilled workers, deep supplier networks and the government’s credible public support for manufacturers and provision of reliable infrastructure,” wrote Gavekal Dragonomics analyst Dan Wang in a report in April.Even if companies find economic alternatives to Chinese factories, or bow to political pressure to increase production in their home markets, there’s another reason why production inside China continues to make sense: the vast and growing Chinese domestic market.Tesla, HoneywellTesla Inc. is now producing cars there for what is now the world’s largest auto market, and last month Chinese Premier Li Keqiang sent Honeywell International Inc. a letter welcoming its new investment in Wuhan, the city where the coronavirus outbreak started. He and other Chinese officials have touted continued economic cooperation with the U.S. and vowed to implement a “phase one” trade deal with the U.S. reached in January.“The formation and development of global industrial and supply chains are determined by market forces and companies’ choices,” Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang said in March. “As such, it is unrealistic and insensible to try to sever them or even trumpet ‘shifting’ or ‘decoupling’ theories as they run counter to economic law.”For all the talk of dependence on China, the pandemic showed that other nations could quickly adapt to meet the need for critical supplies when China’s lockdown halted deliveries of protective clothing, ventilators and medical supplies. Vietnam rapidly ramped up production of face masks, exporting more than 415 million in four months, while the U.S. pushed automakers and other manufacturers to retool plants to make respirators and other critical supplies.Over the long term, however, there are questions of whether those models are sustainable -- and who will pay for new plants outside China.Waving a WandA May 14 executive order from Trump allows the U.S. International Development Finance Corp., America’s development bank for emerging markets, to partner with the Department of Defense in the U.S. to lend money to American companies looking to build out supply chains for critical goods such as ventilators and generic drugs.But with governments already having to fund trillions of dollars in bailout packages for existing businesses and companies going bust in droves, finding the extra capital to restructure global supply chains is a tall order. Andrew Hastie, an Australian lawmaker and chair of the nation’s security and intelligence committee, called in a recent essay for “time limited tax incentives” to build national self-reliance in key pharmaceuticals, medical supplies and other critical goods.In the end, the biggest force diluting China’s position in the global supply chain will likely be the long, slow evolution of global trade, as companies see opportunities that arise from new markets, new technologies and changing patterns of wealth. Why would a firm “say to their staff and their shareholders we have opted for political reasons to change the way that we do things,” said Elms, whose organization helps governments formulate trade policy.“The numbers have to make sense,” she said. “The structure that you have is based on millions of individual company decisions. It’s not so easy to wave a wand and say: Make it so!”(Updates with South Korean policy to get companies to invest at home in 16th paragraph.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Top Stock Reports for Mastercard, Novartis & Boeing
    Zacks

    Top Stock Reports for Mastercard, Novartis & Boeing

    Top Stock Reports for Mastercard, Novartis & Boeing

  • GlobeNewswire

    Lifshitz Law Firm, P.C. Announces Investigation of Apyx Medical Corporation (APYX), Honeywell International Inc. (HON), Immunomedics, Inc. (IMMU), and Zuora, Inc. (ZUO)

    NEW YORK, June 05, 2020 -- Apyx Medical Corporation (APYX) Lifshitz Law Firm, P.C. announces investigation into possible breaches of fiduciary duty by certain of Apyx’s.

  • Honeywell (HON) to Test Advanced T55 Engine for Helicopters
    Zacks

    Honeywell (HON) to Test Advanced T55 Engine for Helicopters

    Honeywell's (HON) modernized T55 engine will allow its operators to maintain lower maintenance costs, while improving its performance and serviceability.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Novo Nordisk, International Business Machines, Honeywell International, Amgen and S&P Global
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Novo Nordisk, International Business Machines, Honeywell International, Amgen and S&P Global

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Novo Nordisk, International Business Machines, Honeywell International, Amgen and S&P Global

  • Yes, You Can Time the Market. Find out How - June 01, 2020
    Zacks

    Yes, You Can Time the Market. Find out How - June 01, 2020

    Is the ability to time the markets more of a data-driven science or a 'gut - feeling' art?

  • Top Stock Reports for Novo Nordisk, IBM & Honeywell
    Zacks

    Top Stock Reports for Novo Nordisk, IBM & Honeywell

    Top Stock Reports for Novo Nordisk, IBM & Honeywell