EXPE - Expedia Group, Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real-time price. Currency in USD
108.91
-3.40 (-3.03%)
At close: 4:00PM EST

108.91 0.00 (0.00%)
After hours: 4:55PM EST

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Previous close112.31
Open113.79
Bid108.94 x 800
Ask112.99 x 1100
Day's range107.62 - 114.09
52-week range93.53 - 144.00
Volume3,372,424
Avg. volume2,855,814
Market cap15.246B
Beta (5Y monthly)1.01
PE ratio (TTM)28.89
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings dateN/A
Forward dividend & yield1.36 (1.21%)
Ex-dividend date08 Mar 2020
1y target estN/A
  • Financial Times

    Expedia cuts 3,000 jobs in major restructuring

    Expedia, the online travel agency, plans to dismiss 3,000 staff and streamline its “sclerotic and bloated” organisation following the departure of its chief executive and chief financial officer in December. The company said in an email to staff that it will “reduce and eliminate certain projects, activities, teams, and roles to streamline and focus our organisation”. The cuts represent around 12 per cent of Expedia’s workforce, and 500 jobs will go in the company’s Seattle headquarters.

  • Expedia Will Cut 3,000 Jobs to Simplify ‘Bloated’ Business
    Bloomberg

    Expedia Will Cut 3,000 Jobs to Simplify ‘Bloated’ Business

    (Bloomberg) -- Expedia Group Inc. said it’s cutting thousands of jobs, striving to simplify the “bloated organization” and return the online travel giant to more disciplined growth.The staff reductions will affect about 3,000 employees, including 500 people in Expedia’s Seattle-based headquarters, said Josh deBerge, a company spokesman. The workers will begin to be notified this week. Expedia didn’t tie the job cuts to effects of the coronavirus, which executives earlier this month said added “uncertainty” to the company’s profit outlook.“Today, Expedia Group announced our intent to simplify how we do business,” deBerge said Monday in a statement. “This includes stopping certain projects and activities, reducing use of vendors and contractors and eliminating approximately 12% of our direct workforce.”Expedia announced the job cuts in an email to its global workforce, which numbered 25,400 as of Dec. 31.“Following our disappointing 2019 business performance and our change in senior-most management, the travel leadership team has spent the last few months determining a better way forward,” the email read. “After consulting with leaders around the globe, we recognize that we have been pursuing growth in an unhealthy and undisciplined way.”Barry Diller, Expedia’s chairman, foreshadowed the job cuts earlier this month during an earnings conference call.“We were a bloated organization,” Diller said on the Feb. 13 call. Over the last few years Expedia has been chasing growth in the intensely competitive travel sector by adding employees and layers of complexity “until frankly very few people could figure out what the hell they were supposed to do during the day,” he said.At the time, Diller said he was targeting $300 million to $500 million in run rate cost-savings in 2020.“I am confident that simplifying our business and clarifying our focus by making these difficult changes, our teams can get back to working on the projects and priorities that make the most sense for us, our customers and our partners,” Diller said Monday in a statement.In December, Expedia Chief Executive Officer Mark Okerstrom and Chief Financial Officer Alan Pickerill were ousted after clashing with the board over a disappointing growth outlook. Diller, the 78-year-old billionaire media mogul and chairman of IAC/InterActiveCorp, has been running the company’s day-to-day operations, along with Vice Chairman Peter Kern, ever since.The company is offering employees severance packages, including extended health-care coverage, according to a person familiar with the issue who asked not to be identified discussing private information.In the email to its staff, Expedia leadership acknowledged this transition would be difficult.“Great tech companies have walked this same path in order to come back stronger and more competitive than ever. We have restarted the journey,” the email said.To contact the reporter on this story: Olivia Carville in New York at ocarville1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jillian Ward at jward56@bloomberg.net, Andrew Pollack, Mark MilianFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Expedia (EXPE) Q4 Earnings Top Estimates, Revenues Up Y/Y
    Zacks

    Expedia (EXPE) Q4 Earnings Top Estimates, Revenues Up Y/Y

    Expedia Group's (EXPE) fourth-quarter results benefit from strengthen across Expedia Partner Solutions and Hotels.com.

  • Bloomberg

    Expedia Jumps After Projecting ‘Double-Digit’ Profit Growth

    (Bloomberg) -- Expedia Group Inc. gave a 2020 profit forecast for “double-digit” growth, topping analysts’ estimates and suggesting the company will be able to maintain bookings in the face of slowing global travel demand caused by the spreading coronavirus. Shares gained more than 10% in extended trading.The online travel giant reported revenue gained 7.3% to $2.75 billion in the fourth quarter, just missing the $2.77 billion analysts’ projected. Gross bookings climbed 5.9% to $23.2 billion in the period ended Dec. 31, the Seattle-based company said Thursday in a statement.Adjusted earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization was $478 million, beating the analysts’ average estimate of $451.6 million, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.“We are not providing a specific guidance range given uncertainty on how much cost savings we’ll recognize this year and the full effect of coronavirus,” Chairman Barry Diller and vice chairman Peter Kern said in the statement. “However, taking these factors into account, we expect 2020 Adjusted EBITDA growth to be in the double-digits.”The pair said they were targeting $300 million to $500 million in “run-rate cost savings across our business.”Diller said the company will streamline and simplify the business. “For several years we have really lost clarity and discipline,” he said on a conference call with analysts. “We were a bloated organization.”Shares jumped to a high of $124.25 in extended trading after closing at $110.59 in New York. The stock has dropped 13% in the past 12 months.The recent outbreak of the coronavirus, known as Covid-19, which originated in China and has spread to more than 20 countries, is battering hospitality companies from airlines to hotels to cruise operators as tourists cancel trips and businesses shutter events. The virus will dent the company’s bottom line by $30 million to $40 million in the current period, executives said on the call. However, Diller conceded the economic impact is difficult to predict.“We don’t truly know the extent of it,” Diller said, adding shortly after that he believes “it will go beyond Asia.”The health crisis is one of several challenges facing the company since Chief Executive Officer Mark Okerstrom and Chief Financial Officer Alan Pickerill were ousted in December after clashing with the board over prospects for growth. Diller said the company isn’t hunting for a new CEO. Instead, the 78-year-old billionaire media mogul will remain in control of the company’s day-to-day operations, along with Kern, for the foreseeable future -- but not beyond 2020.“I haven’t been on one of these analyst calls in endless amount of time so I’m probably a bit draggy,” said Diller, who is chairman and founder of IAC/InterActiveCorp. “Having been chairman of Expedia for, I don’t know, I think 20 years or so, I thought I knew a lot about the company, but there is nothing like being on the ground. And we’ve been on the ground.”In November, Okerstrom lowered the outlook for 2019 earnings after missing analysts’ estimates in the third quarter. Expedia largely blamed Google, which has been cramming the top of its search results with more advertising, pushing down free listings from travel companies and forcing them to spend more on marketing.Diller said he has reached out to Google’s senior management, telling them “exactly what we feel about this. “I have implored them to stop actually taking away the profits from businesses that are one of the main contributors to their advertising revenue.”Diller called for the federal government to regulate Google, saying the new search engine optimization changes were an “existential issue” for online travel agencies. The Federal Trade Commission and the U.S. Justice Department already have announced broad antitrust reviews of the major tech companies, including Alphabet Inc.’s Google.Expedia has been squeezed by Airbnb Inc. and Booking Holdings Inc. in vacation home rentals -- the fastest growing sector of the travel market. Last year, the company revamped its short-term rental unit Vrbo to try to catch up with its rivals. Vrbo reported revenue growth of 13% in the fourth quarter to $259 million. The unit generates about 10% of Expedia’s total revenue, but analysts and investors focus on Vrbo because it represents the company’s best bet for growth.In the fourth quarter, net income rose to $76 million. Profit, excluding certain items, was $1.24 a share, beating analysts’ average estimate of $1.14.(Updates with coronavirus impact in the eighth paragraph; comments from chairman throughout.)To contact the reporter on this story: Olivia Carville in New York at ocarville1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Molly Schuetz at mschuetz9@bloomberg.net, Andrew PollackFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Expedia (EXPE) Surpasses Q4 Earnings Estimates
    Zacks

    Expedia (EXPE) Surpasses Q4 Earnings Estimates

    Expedia (EXPE) delivered earnings and revenue surprises of 5.08% and -0.43%, respectively, for the quarter ended December 2019. Do the numbers hold clues to what lies ahead for the stock?

  • Expedia to Rein in Costs Following Mixed Results in Q4
    Investing.com

    Expedia to Rein in Costs Following Mixed Results in Q4

    Expedia (NASDAQ:EXPE) said it expected to rein in costs after reporting fourth-quarter results on Thursday that beat on the bottom line but fell short of expectations on the top line. Expedia had reported EPS of $3.38 on revenue of $3.56B in the previous quarter. Gross bookings increased 6% in the quarter, driven primarily by growth in Expedia Partner Solutions, which includes the benefit from enterprise deals launched in late 2018, and Hotels.com.

  • Inflation data, earnings: What to know in markets Thursday
    Yahoo Finance

    Inflation data, earnings: What to know in markets Thursday

    Inflation data and a slew of earnings announcements will be in focus Thursday.

  • Expedia Group's (EXPE) to Post Q4 Earnings: What's in Store?
    Zacks

    Expedia Group's (EXPE) to Post Q4 Earnings: What's in Store?

    Expedia Group (EXPE) fourth-quarter results are expected to reflect strength across Core OTA and Egencia. However, weakness in trivago and soft ADR environment are likely to have impacted the results.

  • Google’s Vacation Rentals Targeted by Travel Firms in EU Letter
    Bloomberg

    Google’s Vacation Rentals Targeted by Travel Firms in EU Letter

    (Bloomberg) -- Want the lowdown on European markets? In your inbox before the open, every day. Sign up here.Expedia Group Inc., TripAdvisor Inc. and eDreams Odigeo SA asked the European Union to investigate how Google shows vacation rentals, claiming it unfairly gets a prominent placing above other search results.In a letter to EU Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager published online, more than 30 travel firms allege that Google is “favoring its own service in general search results pages” by displaying ads “in a visually-rich OneBox” showing pictures, a map preview, ratings and prices. The display “secures Google’s service more user attention and clicks than any competing service may acquire.”Google was fined in 2017 for how it displayed product ads above search queries and told to offer similar placement to rival shopping comparison services. It will fight that EU decision at a three-day court hearing later this week. Dozens of companies have complained to the EU about how Google search shows competing search services. Regulators sought feedback last year on local search and jobs search services.Google said statement that it is testing a new format for specialized searches in Europe “where people might see a carousel of links to direct sites across the top of search results.”“This is designed to demonstrate the range of results available,” a spokesperson for the company said in an email. “Search results are designed to provide the most relevant information for your query.”The Financial Times reported on the letter earlier on Monday.To contact the reporter on this story: Aoife White in Brussels at awhite62@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Anthony Aarons at aaarons@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • 3 Things to Know About the Q4 Earnings Season
    Zacks

    3 Things to Know About the Q4 Earnings Season

    3 Things to Know About the Q4 Earnings Season

  • Earnings Preview: Expedia (EXPE) Q4 Earnings Expected to Decline
    Zacks

    Earnings Preview: Expedia (EXPE) Q4 Earnings Expected to Decline

    Expedia (EXPE) doesn't possess the right combination of the two key ingredients for a likely earnings beat in its upcoming report. Get prepared with the key expectations.

  • WeWork’s New CEO Says He Has ‘Plenty of Luck.’ He’ll Need It
    Bloomberg

    WeWork’s New CEO Says He Has ‘Plenty of Luck.’ He’ll Need It

    (Bloomberg) -- Sandeep Mathrani knows what it’s like to lead a company out of trouble.His former employer, General Growth Properties, had been flattened by the economic recession of 2008. GGP, the second-biggest owner of shopping malls in America, named Mathrani as chief executive officer in 2011 as it was emerging from what was then the biggest real estate bankruptcy in U.S. history.Six years later, Mathrani sold the business to Brookfield Property Partners LP in a deal valued at about $15 billion. The project won him a reputation as a corporate turnaround artist. “I’ve had plenty of opportunities and plenty of luck,” he said last year during an acceptance speech for a real estate industry award.That luck will surely be tested in his new job at WeWork. The troubled co-working company appointed Mathrani, 57, as CEO on Saturday. He’ll report to Marcelo Claure, the executive chairman at WeWork and operating chief at SoftBank Group Corp., WeWork’s majority owner. In a statement, Claure praised Mathrani’s “turnaround expertise.”Mathrani is a fixture in the clubby world of commercial real estate, but he also has some experience working with startups. At Brookfield, he led an investment in Industrious, a WeWork rival. “While real estate is full of some very dry, very conservative characters, Sandeep is very much not that,” said Jamie Hodari, co-founder and CEO of Industrious. “If WeWork wanted to bring in someone with serious real estate chops but who was a little closer to the WeWork spirit, he seems to fit that bill.”However, WeWork poses a very different challenge from the shopping center business. Adam Neumann, its larger-than-life co-founder, started WeWork in 2010 to rent trendy office spaces to companies and freelancers. He pitched it as a hybrid real estate and technology business, a “physical social network.”Investors bought into Neumann’s vision, giving him billions of dollars and mostly unchecked authority to set up offices around the world. SoftBank, a Japanese technology conglomerate, was the biggest believer and drove the valuation of the business up to $47 billion.But when they tried to take the parent company We Co. public last year, the plan quickly crumbled under scrutiny from Wall Street. WeWork was spending far more than it was generating in revenue and had a litany of apparent conflicts of interest with Neumann, who received loans from WeWork as it paid him rent on buildings he owned. WeWork pulled the IPO in September and agreed to sever ties with Neumann, netting him an exit package worth more than $1 billion. SoftBank said it would rescue the company by arranging about $9.5 billion in financing.The appointment of Mathrani has parallels to the situation at another unicorn startup once beset by crisis. Uber Technologies Inc., which also counts SoftBank as its largest shareholder, replaced its controversial co-founder with Dara Khosrowshahi in 2017. Khosrowshahi, an Iranian immigrant who rose to the top job at online travel provider Expedia Group Inc., was asked to tame Uber’s raucous workplace culture and its boom-or-bust financial model. Both CEOs were respected in their fields but largely unknown outside. And both had solid reputations as business operators capable of increasing profit at a steady pace and earning accolades from public investors.Mathrani was born into a wealthy family in India. In the early 1980s, his father sent him to the prestigious British boarding school Eton, but he soon left to attend public high school in suburban Philadelphia as an exchange student, Mathrani recounted during the 2019 awards ceremony speech. By age 20, he had earned engineering and business degrees from Stevens Institute of Technology, whose campus in Hoboken, New Jersey, overlooks the New York City skyline.His first foray into real estate came when he made $20,000 from flipping an apartment he’d bought for $55,000 two years earlier. For a young engineer, that was a lot of money, Mathrani said in the speech. “Wow, I made 20 grand, hallelujah,” he recalled thinking at the time. “Real estate is a good business!”Mathrani said he applied for whatever real estate jobs he could find. He was hired as a mall designer and began rising through the ranks. In 1994, he went to Forest City Ratner Cos., the development company owned at the time by real estate titan and former Brooklyn Nets owner Bruce Ratner, who would become one of Mathrani’s mentors, according to Women’s Wear Daily. In 2002, Mathrani joined Vornado Realty Trust, the largest owner of real estate in New York City, where he ran the company’s retail division.Eight years later, the call came to lead GGP. There, Mathrani had to overcome the aftershocks of the recession, a retail industry in decline and the sharp rise of Amazon.com Inc. Mathrani focused on high-end properties and courted internet-native brands like Warby Parker and Tesla Inc. to his malls. He was rewarded by becoming one of the highest-paid executives in real estate.In broadcast interviews and speeches, Mathrani is soft-spoken and understated. For the speech last year, he wore a plain suit, patterned tie and rimless glasses, his hair slightly out of place, looking the part of a college professor. He spoke about his fortune in life and finding success in America.In a statement, Mathrani said WeWork “has redefined how people and companies approach work with an innovative platform.” Under Mathrani, WeWork will refocus on office rentals and walk away from passion projects started by Neumann. It has sold business units and other holdings, including a large stake in female-focused co-working startup the Wing. WeWork also said it would terminate about 2,400 jobs.Staff morale at WeWork is low, and it’ll likely take years to get the company’s finances in order. A recent business plan set a target for positive cash flow by 2023. It could take even longer to change the company’s image in the minds of public investors.Mathrani’s role at WeWork is designed to complement Claure, a longtime telecommunications executive who was abruptly thrust into the WeWork debacle a few months ago when he was named chairman. Claure recently tweeted a photo of an inspirational message that he said reminded him of his first few days learning the real estate industry. The message read: “Be brave enough to suck at something new.”To contact the reporters on this story: Gerrit De Vynck in New York at gdevynck@bloomberg.net;Ellen Huet in San Francisco at ehuet4@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Mark Milian at mmilian@bloomberg.net, ;Alistair Barr at abarr18@bloomberg.net, Vlad SavovFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Evaluating Expedia Group, Inc.’s (NASDAQ:EXPE) Investments In Its Business
    Simply Wall St.

    Evaluating Expedia Group, Inc.’s (NASDAQ:EXPE) Investments In Its Business

    Today we'll look at Expedia Group, Inc. (NASDAQ:EXPE) and reflect on its potential as an investment. Specifically...

  • Internet-Commerce Outlook: Weak Earnings Outlook & Rich Valuation
    Zacks

    Internet-Commerce Outlook: Weak Earnings Outlook & Rich Valuation

    Internet-Commerce Outlook: Weak Earnings Outlook & Rich Valuation

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Alphabet, TripAdvisor, Expedia and Booking Holdings
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Alphabet, TripAdvisor, Expedia and Booking Holdings

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Alphabet, TripAdvisor, Expedia and Booking Holdings

  • GOOGL's Growing Travel Initiatives to Hurt TRIP, EXPE & BKNG
    Zacks

    GOOGL's Growing Travel Initiatives to Hurt TRIP, EXPE & BKNG

    Alphabet's (GOOGL) Google is aggressively trying to bolster presence in the online travel space, which does not bode well for companies like TripAdvisor, Expedia and Booking Holdings.

  • Google Looks to Cash in on Online Travel Demand, Ramps Up Site
    Zacks

    Google Looks to Cash in on Online Travel Demand, Ramps Up Site

    Alphabet's (GOOGL) Google is likely to gain competitive edge against tradition online travel agents on strengthening travel site initiatives.

  • Bear of the Day: TripAdvisor (TRIP)
    Zacks

    Bear of the Day: TripAdvisor (TRIP)

    Bear of the Day: TripAdvisor (TRIP)

  • How Does Expedia Group, Inc. (NASDAQ:EXPE) Fare As A Dividend Stock?
    Simply Wall St.

    How Does Expedia Group, Inc. (NASDAQ:EXPE) Fare As A Dividend Stock?

    Could Expedia Group, Inc. (NASDAQ:EXPE) be an attractive dividend share to own for the long haul? Investors are often...

  • Is Tripadvisor (TRIP) Doomed to Witness a Terrible 2020 Too?
    Zacks

    Is Tripadvisor (TRIP) Doomed to Witness a Terrible 2020 Too?

    TripAdvisor (TRIP) is likely to perform sluggishly in 2020 thanks to rising competitive pressure and ongoing challenges in Hotels, Media & Platform segment.

  • Uber’s Travis Kalanick to Leave Board to Focus on New Business
    Bloomberg

    Uber’s Travis Kalanick to Leave Board to Focus on New Business

    (Bloomberg) -- Uber Technologies Inc.’s former Chief Executive Officer Travis Kalanick is stepping down from the board, severing his last ties to the company he co-founded a decade ago and helped become one of the world’s most valuable, and controversial, startups.Kalanick, 43, has sold all of his remaining shares in the ride-hailing giant and plans to focus on his new business and philanthropic endeavors.Along with co-founder Garrett Camp, Kalanick started Uber in 2009, building the company up from an experimental black car service in San Francisco to a global transportation and logistics company, offering food delivery, freight shipping, helicopter rides and ushering in a new era of work. But he was ousted as CEO in June 2017 following months of chaos and controversy. Detractors pointed to his aggressive and sometimes reckless management style as breeding a toxic workplace hostile to women and overseeing morally questionable company programs including some that intentionally deceived regulators and law enforcement agencies and spied on riders.“Uber has been a part of my life for the past 10 years,” Kalanick said in a statement Tuesday. “At the close of the decade, and with the company now public, it seems like the right moment for me to focus on my current business and philanthropic pursuits.”For the past year, Kalanick has been building a new startup: CloudKitchens. The real estate company offers fully outfitted kitchens to restaurants that need more space to fulfill orders from take-out food services like DoorDash and UberEats. Along with using his own funds, Kalanick also raised $400 million from Saudi Arabia’s sovereign wealth fund.Following Kalanick’s departure as CEO, the board replaced him with Dara Khosrowshahi, a former executive of Expedia Inc., who has worked to rebuild the company’s reputation and promise to investors. Since its initial public offering in May – one of the worst IPOs this year -- Uber shares have cratered by more than 30%. They were up 1% at 12:04 p.m. in New York.With Kalanick fully separated from Uber now, Wedbush Securities analysts said it could help the stock, since his continued presence on the board was a “distraction.”“With ripping the band-aid off and Travis leaving stage left on the board, we believe now it’s about Dara & Co. taking Uber in the right direction for 2020 and beyond after a rough road so far,” wrote Wedbush analysts Ygal Arounian and Dan Ives, adding that the massive sell-off of shares following the Nov. 6 lockup expiry has also hurt the stock price.Kalanick has been steadily unloading his Uber shares in the past few weeks. He sold the remaining 5.8 million shares before resigning from the board Monday night, a spokeswoman said, for a grand haul of almost $3 billion, according to calculations by Bloomberg. Before the lockup expired, Kalanick held a 6% stake in Uber, which made him the firm’s largest individual shareholder. Softbank Group Corp. and Benchmark Capital are the company’s two largest institutional shareholders.Such a selldown is unusual among prominent tech tycoons. Facebook Inc.’s Mark Zuckerberg and Amazon.com Inc.’s Jeff Bezos still own sizeable stakes in their companies. Still, neither of them were ousted by a boardroom coup. And Kalanick’s sales mean he has plenty of financial firepower for his other projects. He created a fund called 10100 in March 2018, saying in a tweet it would focus on his “passions, investments, ideas and big bets.” The fund will handle Kalanick’s for-profit investments and philanthropy and plans to invest in real estate, e-commerce and emerging innovation in China and India, according to its website.“Very few entrepreneurs have built something as profound as Travis Kalanick did with Uber,” Khosrowshahi said. “I’m enormously grateful for Travis’s vision and tenacity while building Uber, and for his expertise as a board member. Everyone at Uber wishes him all the best.”Kalanick’s departure from Uber’s board will be effective Dec. 31, according to a statement Tuesday. Uber’s 12-person board has steadily shrunk since the company went public in May and now will have four openings.(Updates with analyst comment in eighth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Tom Metcalf and Sophie Alexander.To contact the reporter on this story: Lizette Chapman in San Francisco at lchapman19@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jillian Ward at jward56@bloomberg.net, Robin Ajello, Molly SchuetzFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2020 Bloomberg L.P.