CL - Colgate-Palmolive Company

NYSE - NYSE Delayed price. Currency in USD
77.20
+0.33 (+0.43%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT

76.81 -0.39 (-0.51%)
Before hours: 8:16AM EDT

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Previous close76.87
Open76.61
Bid76.21 x 1100
Ask78.25 x 1000
Day's range75.81 - 77.46
52-week range58.49 - 77.46
Volume4,347,233
Avg. volume3,957,676
Market cap66.124B
Beta (5Y monthly)0.59
PE ratio (TTM)25.82
EPS (TTM)2.99
Earnings date30 Oct 2020 - 03 Nov 2020
Forward dividend & yield1.76 (2.28%)
Ex-dividend date17 Jul 2020
1y target est76.36
  • Colgate-Palmolive Co (CL) Q2 2020 Earnings Call Transcript
    Motley Fool

    Colgate-Palmolive Co (CL) Q2 2020 Earnings Call Transcript

    Image source: The Motley Fool. Colgate-Palmolive Co (NYSE: CL)Q2 2020 Earnings CallJul 31, 2020, 8:30 a.m. ETContents: Prepared Remarks Questions and Answers Call Participants Prepared Remarks: OperatorGood day and welcome to the Colgate-Palmolive Second Quarter 2020 Earnings Conference Call.

  • Colgate-Palmolive Posts Strong Second-Quarter Organic Sales, Beating on EPS, Revenue
    Motley Fool

    Colgate-Palmolive Posts Strong Second-Quarter Organic Sales, Beating on EPS, Revenue

    As people continue to scrub their hands and various surfaces in an effort to stave off COVID-19, Colgate-Palmolive (NYSE: CL) issued positive second-quarter 2020 results today, outstripping several analyst predictions about key earnings metrics. Colgate-Palmolive is noted as a Dividend King, currently providing approximately 2.4% yield annually and featuring a 52% payout ratio. Adjusted EPS for the quarter climbed to $0.74, beating the FactSet analyst consensus by $0.04.

  • Colgate-Palmolive (CL) Beats Q2 Earnings and Revenue Estimates
    Zacks

    Colgate-Palmolive (CL) Beats Q2 Earnings and Revenue Estimates

    Colgate-Palmolive (CL) delivered earnings and revenue surprises of 4.23% and 2.56%, respectively, for the quarter ended June 2020. Do the numbers hold clues to what lies ahead for the stock?

  • Colgate-Palmolive (CL) Expected to Beat Earnings Estimates: Can the Stock Move Higher?
    Zacks

    Colgate-Palmolive (CL) Expected to Beat Earnings Estimates: Can the Stock Move Higher?

    Colgate-Palmolive (CL) possesses the right combination of the two key ingredients for a likely earnings beat in its upcoming report. Get prepared with the key expectations.

  • General Mills CEO: 'You can’t make the food the world needs unless you’re taking care of your people first'
    Yahoo Finance

    General Mills CEO: 'You can’t make the food the world needs unless you’re taking care of your people first'

    Everyone is still eating at home amidst the COVID-19 pandemic in a big way. Yahoo Finance speaks with the CEO of Cheerios and Dunkaroos maker General Mills.

  • These 3 Dividend Aristocrats Have Already Boosted Their Payouts in 2020
    Motley Fool

    These 3 Dividend Aristocrats Have Already Boosted Their Payouts in 2020

    The coronavirus pandemic didn't stop these giants from giving dividend investors what they want.

  • Colgate-Palmolive (CL) Moves to Buy: Rationale Behind the Upgrade
    Zacks

    Colgate-Palmolive (CL) Moves to Buy: Rationale Behind the Upgrade

    Colgate-Palmolive (CL) has been upgraded to a Zacks Rank 2 (Buy), reflecting growing optimism about the company's earnings prospects. This might drive the stock higher in the near term.

  • Colgate-Palmolive (CL) is a Top Dividend Stock Right Now: Should You Buy?
    Zacks

    Colgate-Palmolive (CL) is a Top Dividend Stock Right Now: Should You Buy?

    Dividends are one of the best benefits to being a shareholder, but finding a great dividend stock is no easy task. Does Colgate-Palmolive (CL) have what it takes? Let's find out.

  • Colgate-Palmolive Webcasts 2020 Second Quarter Earnings Conference Call July 31, 2020 – 8:30 a.m. ET
    Business Wire

    Colgate-Palmolive Webcasts 2020 Second Quarter Earnings Conference Call July 31, 2020 – 8:30 a.m. ET

    Colgate-Palmolive Company (NYSE:CL) will provide a live webcast of its 2020 second quarter earnings conference call on Friday, July 31, 2020, at 8:30 a.m. ET. The call will be hosted by Chairman, President and CEO, Noel Wallace, and Chief Investor Relations Officer, John Faucher.

  • Is Colgate-Palmolive a Buy?
    Motley Fool

    Is Colgate-Palmolive a Buy?

    Colgate-Palmolive (NYSE: CL) has proved remarkably resilient during the pandemic as first-quarter sales rose 5.5% from last year and profits bounded 28% higher. Because the personal care products giant generates around 70% of its revenue from international markets, and 45% of total sales came from emerging markets in the first quarter, its business has performed admirably despite widespread exposure to the impacts caused by the coronavirus. A good part of Colgate-Palmolive's ability to withstand the storm has been the strength of its portfolio of brands, which often occupy the top one or two spots in any given category.

  • Looking for a Growth Stock? 3 Reasons Why Colgate-Palmolive (CL) is a Solid Choice
    Zacks

    Looking for a Growth Stock? 3 Reasons Why Colgate-Palmolive (CL) is a Solid Choice

    Colgate-Palmolive (CL) possesses solid growth attributes, which could help it handily outperform the market.

  • Are You Looking for a High-Growth Dividend Stock? Colgate-Palmolive (CL) Could Be a Great Choice
    Zacks

    Are You Looking for a High-Growth Dividend Stock? Colgate-Palmolive (CL) Could Be a Great Choice

    Dividends are one of the best benefits to being a shareholder, but finding a great dividend stock is no easy task. Does Colgate-Palmolive (CL) have what it takes? Let's find out.

  • Colgate-Palmolive Declares a Fresh Dividend; Yield is 2.4%
    Motley Fool

    Colgate-Palmolive Declares a Fresh Dividend; Yield is 2.4%

    The board of directors of Colgate-Palmolive (NYSE: CL), one of the stock market's sturdiest dividend payers, has declared its latest quarterly shareholder distribution. Colgate-Palmolive is one of the market's few Dividend Aristocrats (S&P 500 stocks that have raised their dividends at least once annually for a minimum of 25 years running). It should be noted, however, that this latest payout does not represent a raise over the previous amount; Colgate-Palmolive's latest lift was declared in March.

  • Colgate Declares Regular Quarterly Dividend
    Business Wire

    Colgate Declares Regular Quarterly Dividend

    The Board of Directors of Colgate-Palmolive Company (NYSE:CL) today declared a quarterly cash dividend of $0.44 per common share, payable on August 14, 2020, to shareholders of record on July 20, 2020. The Company has paid uninterrupted dividends on its common stock since 1895.

  • Bloomberg

    Economic Nationalism Is a Wrong Turn for Covid-Hit India

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Prime Minister Narendra Modi wants all 1.3 billion Indians to be “vocal for local” — meaning, to not just use domestically made products but also to promote them. As an overseas citizen living in Hong Kong, I’m doing my bit by very vocally demanding Indian mangoes on every trip to the grocery. But half the summer is gone, and not a single slice so far.My loss is due to India’s Covid-19 lockdown, which has severely pinched logistics, a perennial challenge in the huge, infrastructure-starved country. But more worrying than the disruption is the fruity political response to it. Rather than being a wake-up call for fixing supply chains, the pandemic seems to be putting India on an isolationist course. Why? Granted that the liberal view that trade is good and autarky bad isn’t exactly fashionable anywhere right now. What makes India’s lurch troublesome is that the pace and direction of economic nationalism may be set by domestic business interests. The Indian liberals, many of whom are Western-trained academics, authors and — at least until a few years ago — policy makers, want a more competitive economy. They will be powerless to prevent the slide.Modi’s call for a self-reliant India has been echoed by Home Minister Amit Shah, the cabinet’s unofficial No. 2, in a television interview. If Indians don’t buy foreign-made goods, the economy will see a jump, he said. The strategy — although it’s too nebulous yet to call it that — has a geopolitical element. A military standoff with China is under way, apparently triggered by India’s completion of a road and bridge near the common border in the tense Himalayan region of Ladakh. It’s very expensive to fight even a limited war there. With India’s economy flattened by Covid, New Delhi may be looking for ways to restore the status quo and send Beijing a signal.Economic boycotts, such as Chinese consumers’ rejection of Japanese goods over territorial disputes in the East China Sea, are well understood as statecraft. In these times, it’s not even necessary to name an enemy. An undercurrent of popular anger against China, the source of both the virus and India’s biggest bilateral trade deficit, is supposed to do the job. But is it ever that easy? A hastily introduced policy to stock only local goods in police and paramilitary canteens became a farcical exercise after the list of banned items ended up including products by the local units of Colgate-Palmolive Co., Nestle SA, and Unilever NV, which have had significant Indian operations for between 60 and 90 years, as well as Dabur India Ltd., a New Delhi-based maker of Ayurveda brands. The since-withdrawn list demonstrates the practical difficulty of bureaucrats trying to find things in a globalized world that are 100% indigenous. Free-trade champions fret that the prime minister, whom they saw as being on their side six years ago, is acting against their advice to dismantle statist controls on land, labor and capital to help make the country more competitive. Engage with the world more, not less, they caution. But Modi also has to satisfy the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh, the umbrella Hindu organisation that gets him votes. Its backbone of small traders, builders and businessmen — the RSS admits only men — was losing patience with the anemic economy even before the pandemic. Now, they’re in deep trouble, because India’s broken financial system won’t deliver even state-guaranteed loans to them. The U.S.-China tensions — over trade, intellectual property, Covid responsibility and Hong Kong’s autonomy — offer a perfect backdrop. A dire domestic economy and trouble at the border provide the foreground. Big business will dial economic nationalism up and down to hit a trifecta of goals: Block competition from the People's Republic; make Western rivals fall in line and do joint ventures; and tap deep overseas capital markets. The first goal is being achieved with newly placed restrictions on investment from any country that shares a land border with India. The second aim is to be realized by corporate lobbying to influence India's whimsical economic policies. As for the third objective, with the regulatory environment becoming tougher for U.S.-listed Chinese companies like Alibaba Group Holding Ltd., an opportunity may open up for Indian firms.All this may bring India Shenzhen-style enclaves of manufacturing and trade, but it will concentrate economic power in fewer hands, something that worries liberals. They’re moved by the suffering of India’s low-wage workers, who have borne the brunt of the Covid shutdown. But when their vision of a more just society and fairer income distribution prompts them to make common cause with the ideological Left, they’re quickly repelled by the Marxist voodoo that all cash, property, bonds and real estate held by citizens or within the nation “must be treated as national resources available during this crisis.” Who will invest in a country that does that instead of just printing money? At the same time, when liberals look to the business class, they see a sudden swelling of support for ideas like a universal basic income. They wonder if this isn’t a ploy by industry to outsource part of the cost of labor to the taxpayer. Slogans like Modi’s vocal-for-local stir the pot and thicken the confusion. The value-conscious Indian consumer couldn’t give two hoots for calls to buy Indian, but large firms will know how to exploit economic nationalism. One day soon, I’ll get my mangoes — from them.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andy Mukherjee is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering industrial companies and financial services. He previously was a columnist for Reuters Breakingviews. He has also worked for the Straits Times, ET NOW and Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Colgate-Palmolive Webcasts Presentation at the dbAccess Global Consumer Virtual Conference
    Business Wire

    Colgate-Palmolive Webcasts Presentation at the dbAccess Global Consumer Virtual Conference

    Colgate-Palmolive Chairman, President and CEO, Noel Wallace, and Group President, Latin America & Asia Pacific, Panos Tsourapas, will present on Tuesday, June 9, 2020 at the dbAccess Global Consumer Virtual Conference at 10:00 a.m. ET.

  • Colgate-Palmolive (CL) Up 2.9% Since Last Earnings Report: Can It Continue?
    Zacks

    Colgate-Palmolive (CL) Up 2.9% Since Last Earnings Report: Can It Continue?

    Colgate-Palmolive (CL) reported earnings 30 days ago. What's next for the stock? We take a look at earnings estimates for some clues.

  • Why Colgate-Palmolive Is a Retiree's Dream Stock
    Motley Fool

    Why Colgate-Palmolive Is a Retiree's Dream Stock

    Colgate-Palmolive (NYSE: CL) has built a business over the centuries that is essential to practically every consumer's everyday life. The company continues to expand its global footprint, and it actually derives three-quarters of its revenue from emerging markets, which could be considered one of the few risks associated with an investment in its stock, though it also presents a world of opportunity to cash in on rising disposable income levels. Coupled with an enviable record of sharing its success by returning value to shareholders, it's easy to see why Colgate's stock fits into a dream retirement portfolio.

  • 3 Top Stocks to Recession-Proof Your Portfolio
    Motley Fool

    3 Top Stocks to Recession-Proof Your Portfolio

    When investors worry about a possible recession, they will often rotate out of economically sensitive stocks into sectors that are less affected by weakness. CME Group (NASDAQ: CME) is one of the biggest options and futures exchanges in the world. The company runs the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, the Chicago Board of Trade, and the New York Mercantile Exchange.

  • 5 Dividend Kings to Buy and Hold Forever
    Motley Fool

    5 Dividend Kings to Buy and Hold Forever

    The "forever" part means investors have to think about the longevity of payout growth as well as reliable payments.

  • Colgate-Palmolive’s 2019 Corporate Social Responsibility & Sustainability Report Details Progress Toward a Healthier Future
    Business Wire

    Colgate-Palmolive’s 2019 Corporate Social Responsibility & Sustainability Report Details Progress Toward a Healthier Future

    Colgate-Palmolive Company’s global manufacturing teams have cut absolute carbon dioxide emissions by a third, cut energy use by a third, and water use by half. The achievements are highlighted in "Building a Future to Smile About," the Company’s 2019 Corporate Social Responsibility & Sustainability Report.

  • Colgate-Palmolive Falls 2.5% Despite Q1 Beats
    Motley Fool

    Colgate-Palmolive Falls 2.5% Despite Q1 Beats

    Colgate-Palmolive Company (NYSE: CL) reported its 2020 first-quarter results on Friday before market open. While the sprawling consumer goods giant beat analyst estimates on both the top and bottom lines for the quarter, it pulled its full-year 2020 guidance. The company posted just under $4.10 billion in net sales, a 5.5% improvement over the same quarter last year.

  • Colgate-Palmolive Webcasts Presentation at its 2020 Annual Meeting of Stockholders May 8, 2020 – 10:00 a.m. ET
    Business Wire

    Colgate-Palmolive Webcasts Presentation at its 2020 Annual Meeting of Stockholders May 8, 2020 – 10:00 a.m. ET

    Colgate-Palmolive Company (NYSE:CL) will provide a live audio webcast of its 2020 Annual Meeting of Stockholders on Friday, May 8, 2020 at 10:00 a.m. ET. The meeting, which will be held in a virtual format only, will be hosted by Noel Wallace, Chairman, President and CEO.

  • Colgate-Palmolive Co (CL) Q1 2020 Earnings Call Transcript
    Motley Fool

    Colgate-Palmolive Co (CL) Q1 2020 Earnings Call Transcript

    Now for opening remarks, I would like to turn this call over to Chief Investor Relations Officer, John Faucher. This is John Faucher, Chief Investor Relations Officer. Please refer to the earnings press release and our most recent filings with the SEC, including our 2019 Annual Report on Form 10-K and subsequent SEC filings, all available on Colgate's website for discussion of the factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from these statements.