AMZN - Amazon.com, Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real-time price. Currency in USD
3,200.00
+17.37 (+0.55%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close3,182.63
Open3,191.76
Bid0.00 x 800
Ask0.00 x 800
Day's range3,135.70 - 3,215.00
52-week range1,626.03 - 3,215.00
Volume5,485,982
Avg. volume4,846,658
Market cap1.596T
Beta (5Y monthly)1.32
PE ratio (TTM)152.85
EPS (TTM)20.94
Earnings date23 Jul 2020 - 27 Jul 2020
Forward dividend & yieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-dividend dateN/A
1y target est2,852.48
  • Bloomberg

    India Seeks to Limit Facebook, Google Dominance Over Online Data

    (Bloomberg) -- India needs a new data regulator to oversee the sharing, monetization and privacy of information collected online, an expert committee appointed by the government has recommended.In a 72-page report seen by Bloomberg News, the eight-person panel said that “market forces on their own will not bring about the maximum social and economic benefits from data for the society” and identified key issues that a new regulator would have to tackle. It would have to ensure that all stakeholders follow rules, provide data when legitimate requests are made, evaluate risks of re-identification of anonymized personal data and also help level the playing field for businesses, the report advised.The document named U.S. giants Facebook Inc., Amazon.com Inc., Uber Technologies Inc. and Alphabet Inc.’s Google as the beneficiaries of first-mover advantages and network effects that have “left many new entrants and start-ups being squeezed and faced with significant entry barriers.” The regulator’s envisioned role in facilitating data sharing would be to lessen these effects and also spur innovation, economic growth and social wellbeing.As countries around the world from the U.K. to China tighten data protection within their borders, India is moving to draft and reinforce policies governing its burgeoning digital economy. It already has a bill for governing the use of personal data, and this latest report recommends adding the non-personal data regulator via legislation as well.Non-personal data refers to information that does not include any details such as name, age or address that could be used to identify an individual. It also comprises data that was initially personal but later aggregated and made anonymous.The rules proposed in the report would govern collection, analysis, sharing, distribution of gains, as well as the destruction of data. This is with the goal of providing certainty for existing businesses and incentives for the creation of new ones, so as to tap the “enormous” social and public value from data, the report said.The committee recommended creating a new “data business” classification for those firms that collect, process, store, or otherwise manage data. Those may include health, e-commerce, internet and technology services companies, many of whom were consulted by the committee prior to the drafting of the report. Data businesses are envisaged as encompassing various industry sectors. “The compliance process will be lightweight and fully digital,” the report said.“Just like the economic rights to natural resources arising from a community are considered to primarily belong to it, the value of social resources of Community Non-Personal Data should primarily accrue to it (instead of the default whereby data custodians take up the entire value of such data),” the report said.The committee’s head Kris Gopalakrishnan, who co-founded IT services company Infosys Ltd., as well as Debjani Ghosh, president of NASSCOM, the IT services industry trade group, declined to comment.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg

    Covid-19 Is Draining the Suds from Brazil’s Soap Operas

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Brazilians take their melodramas seriously. So when penniless Eliza, the star of “Totalmente Demais”(Total Dreamer), a soap opera spinoff of Pygmalion, runs off to the big city in search of a job and a new life, this nation of couch warriors drew battle lines.Would Eliza — a tropical Eliza Doolittle — end up with humble Jonatas, a hardscabble street vendor who falls hard for the ingenue  and helps rescue her  from the perils of the urban fleshpot? Or better she surrender to Arthur, the slick fashion impresario who whisked her onto the catwalk with whispers of fame and fortune? Last month as the on-screen rivalry grew fierce, so did the social media frenzy over which pair — “Joliza” or “Arliza” — to ship.Never mind that everyone already knew the denouement. (She chooses Jonatas.) Totalmente Demais debuted five years ago. Its revival owes not to popular demand but the coronavirus, which has forced producers everywhere to shut down studios, stages and stadiums. Totalmente Demais is just one on a long playlist of reruns that signature Brazilian network TV Globo is counting on to keep the house-bound nation in swoons and tears. Will reheated soaps still juice Latin America’s most demanding living rooms?Hold the hydroxychloroquine. “The show is more popular now than when it originally aired,” Mauricio Stycer, a television critic for the website UOL told me. But this is where the story line for TV Globo, and culture providers everywhere, gets murky. So intense was the partisan engagement over Eliza’s fate, scores of discontents demanded a new ending, with Eliza going for Arthur. The author demurred; there simply was no way to reshoot the finale in mid-pandemic.  The message to the entertainment moguls was hard to miss. Yesterday’s favorites may keep screens aglow while families are stuck indoors, but the thrill of the old will fade. Yes, newscasts have plugged part of the programming gap, but viewers cannot live on grim headlines alone. The problem is especially dramatic for TV Globo, the national market leader, which was forced to put 14 primetime soaps and dramatic series on ice as it pored over how to reboot the nation’s most cherished industry. Over the years, seasoned director and writer Ricardo Linhares has seen actors fall ill and suffer heart attacks, with one dying in mid-production. “But we’ve never faced a moment like this when the whole industry comes to a hard stop,” he told me. This is not just any industry. What keeps Brazilians stoked and talking through good times and bad are its teledramas. (Not for nothing did President Jair Bolsonaro briefly cast veteran soap star Regina Duarte as his culture secretary, though she bombed in the role after just 77 days.) The novela has already suffered setbacks, mainly from on-demand providers like Netflix and Amazon Prime. But streaming services are still too pricey for Brazil’s majority of modest and lower income households, whose go-to pastime is still the broadcast sagas. While the main networks, which are not publicly traded, don’t publish their revenue flows, it’s no secret that novelas are the meal ticket. Before coronavirus, market leader Globo aired four separate homemade telenovelas six days a week during prime viewing hours.So how to convincingly shoot guy gets girl, or girl gets girl, and still safeguard cast, crew and socially responsible messaging?Cautionary tales abound. The host of a popular family variety show at SBT, another big network, recently tested positive  a few weeks after the station jump-started tapings in April, and all her crew is under observation. The network has since suspended new shoots. A number of other screen and stage celebrities have also fallen ill. Globo has rolled out elaborate health protocols for a restart, the date for which is under review. Actors, directors and stage hands will be expected to submit regularly to tests for Covid-19, with temperature checks before every recording. Infectious disease specialists will be on call and even on set. The typically multitudinous cast and crews are to be winnowed, especially child actors, and everyone on set must keep at least 2 meters apart. “A typical novela involves around 400 people, with 120 on the set at any time. We’re going to reduce to 15 or so,” said Jose Villamarim, a director. Such safeguards could add as much as 30% to production costs, according to one report.Globo has left whether to incorporate the virus into their scripts to its screenwriters and directors. The creators of one interrupted novela, “Amor de Mãe,” which revolves around a mother’s search for a son stolen from her at birth, have decided to meet the challenge by bringing coronavirus into the plot. The rewrite will include scenes of empty streets, characters in masks, families in lockdown and a character who falls ill. The broader aesthetic challenge may be more vexing. How to tell stories in a cherished genre which turns on intimacy, passion and collective bliss? “The whole novela hinges on waiting for that kiss or for the villain to get a beating,” Nelson Motta, a Brazilian cultural producer said. Forget the crowded family breakfast table and those big fat Brazilian weddings, two cherished novela tropes. “Until they find a way to disinfect everyone and everything, all that’s history,” Motta said.Fortunately, the pandemic has also stimulated innovation. “The Confinement Diaries” is a comedy series created by a homebound Globo comic actor and his art director wife, who riff on  the frustrations and follies of life in lockdown. Yet these are opportunistic solutions with an understandably limited shelf life. It’s too soon to know what post-pandemic teledrama will look like. In 55 years of soap-making, Globo faced a shutdown only once, in 1975, when the military dictatorship censored a novela it found seditious. Nevertheless, the producers quickly scrambled to replace that drama and then elude the censors until democracy returned, but the show went on. With the virus still at large, all bets are off. “No one is talking about a new normal yet,” said Villamarim. Some see computers as salvation. Animated filmmaking, where most of the talent is digital and voices studio dubbed, is on a roll, as are post-production computer graphic artists. One possible workaround: a transparent pane of glass or plastic to separate heartthrobs in intimate scenes, which can be digitally erased by studio wizards. “I’m thinking of patenting this one,” said Villamarim. Call them soap shields. But it will take more than digital tricks to keep this nation of televoyeurs on the couch. “Otherwise, the only winners will be French cinema, where it’s all blah, blah, blah and nothing happens,” said Motta. Like everyone else, soap aficionados are pulling for a vaccine.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Mac Margolis is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering Latin and South America. He was a reporter for Newsweek and is the author of “The Last New World: The Conquest of the Amazon Frontier.”For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • 3 Stay-at-Home Tech Stocks to Buy Right Now
    Motley Fool

    3 Stay-at-Home Tech Stocks to Buy Right Now

    If you believe the stay-at-home economy is here to stay, at least in some degree, then the following stocks of Amazon.com (NASDAQ: AMZN), T-Mobile (NASDAQ: TMUS), and Sony (NYSE: SNE) all look like terrific buys today. Not only did the e-commerce and cloud behemoth have some catching up to do, but COVID-19 has also made Amazon even more indispensable, accelerating its customer growth. Just think about all of the indispensable products and services Amazon has: The world's leading e-commerce platform?

  • Walmart's New Subscription Service Has a Key Advantage Over Amazon Prime
    Motley Fool

    Walmart's New Subscription Service Has a Key Advantage Over Amazon Prime

    Walmart (NYSE: WMT) is preparing to launch its latest assault on Amazon (NASDAQ: AMZN). According to an article on Recode this week, the retail giant is about to unveil a new subscription service called Walmart+ that will offer similar benefits to Amazon Prime. Costing $98 a year, Walmart+ will be a significant step up from Delivery Unlimited, its existing same-day grocery delivery service.

  • 3 Top Entertainment Stocks to Buy Now
    Motley Fool

    3 Top Entertainment Stocks to Buy Now

    You'll find everything from undervalued giants to skyrocketing growth stocks in the entertainment sector right now.

  • Better Buy: Shopify vs. MercadoLibre
    Motley Fool

    Better Buy: Shopify vs. MercadoLibre

    MercadoLibre (NASDAQ: MELI), the leading e-commerce player serving Latin America, has seen its stock climb more than 75% since the beginning of the year, trouncing the S&P 500. Let's compare both companies in terms of their growth, addressable market, financial stability, leadership, and valuation to pick a winner. Over the last several years, Shopify's growth has been slowing as it gets larger, but it still posts impressive year-over-year gains in the 40%-plus range.

  • 2 Stock Bubbles That Could Pop in the Next Market Crash
    Motley Fool

    2 Stock Bubbles That Could Pop in the Next Market Crash

    The Nasdaq hitting a record high in July is just the exclamation point on top of it all, reminding investors that many stock prices are out of control. Below are two stocks that at this point are bubbles and could be ready to pop the next time there's a market crash. Shares of virtual care provider Teladoc (NYSE: TDOC) are soaring this year as people are staying home amid the pandemic and looking for ways to minimize their exposure to COVID-19.

  • TikTok Gets an Amazon-Sized Scare
    Bloomberg

    TikTok Gets an Amazon-Sized Scare

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- What was a turbulent enough week for TikTok turned downright bizarre on Friday.Already, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo had warned that the Trump administration was looking at banning the short-video platform owned by Beijing-based parent ByteDance Ltd. over data-privacy concerns, and President Donald Trump himself said he was considering banning TikTok as one way to retaliate against China over the coronavirus. Then things got worse when Amazon.com Inc. on Friday sent an email to employees telling them to delete the TikTok app from mobile devices they use to access company email, citing “security risks.”The bizarre part happened just hours after that, when Amazon issued a statement saying the it had sent the email to its employees “in error” and there was no change in their policies toward TikTok. All clear? Not quite. For soon after Amazon corrected the record on its TikTok policy, Wells Fargo & Co. confirmed a report from the Information that the bank had told employees to delete the app from work phones because of “concerns about TikTok’s privacy and security controls and practices.”For sure, the company dodged a bullet when it comes to Amazon. But it is unknown whether the e-commerce giant intends to resend a similar email on TikTok policy in the future; clearly, someone drafted something. And the government threats remain. Not only that: The prospect of a potential ban has brought widespread anxiety to the TikTok community. In recent days, many creators posted tearful “goodbye” videos, with some asking their viewers to follow their accounts on other platforms such as YouTube and Instagram. What has been a slow boil of troublesome developments risks cascading into a full-blown public relations crisis. Whether or not the security concerns are justified or the motivations political, TikTok can and should do a lot more to address them and take more control of the narrative. TikTok’s responses, thus far, have been low-key. The company has said it keeps its user data in the U.S. with backups in Singapore and has never provided data to the Chinese government. On Friday, in response to the initial Amazon news, it said in a statement that “user security is of the utmost importance” to TikTok, adding it hadn’t heard from Amazon about its concerns and looks forward to a “dialogue so we can address any issues” the tech giant may have. A more proactive response is in order, and here are some things TikTok can do. First, statements aren’t enough. Where is TikTok’s CEO? Earlier this year, ByteDance hired former Walt Disney Co. executive Kevin Mayer to head up TikTok. You’d think the veteran media executive would be the perfect ambassador to help tamp down concerns. He needs to get out there and explain TikTok’s side of the story, whether in interviews to print press or on TV. He should know the basics of crisis management and PR strategy, following his long tenure in the upper ranks of a U.S. entertainment giant.Second, the Wall Street Journal on Thursday said ByteDance was considering making changes to its corporate structure, including the creation of a new management board for TikTok or designating a new headquarters for the company outside of China. While it won’t make a huge difference as TikTok will be still owned by the China-based ByteDance, both are easy, low-hanging-fruit-type moves that would at least give the appearance of more autonomy. They should go ahead and announce the changes as soon as possible. It also wouldn’t hurt to remind the public of TikTok’s growing U.S. workforce.And finally, TikTok needs to forcefully defend itself against the Trump administration’s conjecture and allegations. Yes, it’s a bit of a tricky situation as any pushback can backfire if not done tactfully, but the company can’t afford not to respond. Further, it should hire an external, independent consulting firm to do a full security audit. Anything to assuage the security and privacy concerns would help as the pressure isn’t going away. Late Friday, Fox Business’s Charlie Gasparino reported the White House is looking at using the Committee on Foreign Investment review as possible way to ban TikTok by saying its prior acquisition of Musical.ly was illegal. ByteDance has been under review by the interagency committee in the U.S. for its 2017 purchase of the lip-synching startup.In many ways, TikTok’s situation is similar to the public relations frenzy over Zoom Video Communications Inc. in early April. At the time, the video-conferencing company — whose service had seen an unprecedented surge from business customers and other entities looking to connect under lockdown — faced an avalanche of scrutiny over its security and privacy practices, including its use of Chinese servers. In response, CEO Eric Yuan proactively made himself available for numerous media interviews and helped restore his company’s reputation. He conducted weekly webinars, hired security experts and did whatever it took to educate the public that fears concerning his company’s products were overblown and that Zoom had taken concrete steps to address the issues. The strategy appears to have worked, as Zoom has managed to both retain customers and attract more to its platform.TikTok should take note and do the same. Hunkering down and doing the bare minimum is not a great strategy.(The third paragraph of this column was updated to include information about Wells Fargo’s ban of the TikTok app on its employees’ work phones.)This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tae Kim is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering technology. He previously covered technology for Barron's, following an earlier career as an equity analyst.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Disney+'s 'Hamilton' gambit pays off, giving platform a big boost: Data
    Yahoo Finance

    Disney+'s 'Hamilton' gambit pays off, giving platform a big boost: Data

    ‘Hamilton’ is continuing to soar following its Disney+ debut with 80% of users tuning in to watch the Broadway phenomenon, according to research complied by 7Park Data.

  • 3 Top U.S. Stocks to Buy in July
    Motley Fool

    3 Top U.S. Stocks to Buy in July

    FedEx (NYSE: FDX), Lululemon (NASDAQ: LULU), and Intel (NASDAQ: INTC) are all quietly making moves that set them up nicely for the future. Interestingly, FedEx and Lululemon have been able to adapt to COVID-19 realities and increase business, while Intel works behind the scenes to deliver advanced technology today. In 2019, FedEx cut ties with Amazon (NASDAQ: AMZN), causing many on Wall Street to shake their heads.

  • Better Buy: Amazon vs. Hasbro
    Motley Fool

    Better Buy: Amazon vs. Hasbro

    You'll find both at Amazon.com (NASDAQ: AMZN) and Hasbro (NASDAQ: HAS). Amazon benefited from consumers' need for essentials and the fact that many opted for online shopping. As a result, Amazon's shares climbed nearly 50% in the first half.

  • Wells Fargo Tells Workers to Remove TikTok App From Work Phones
    Bloomberg

    Wells Fargo Tells Workers to Remove TikTok App From Work Phones

    (Bloomberg) -- Wells Fargo & Co. said it asked employees to remove TikTok from their work phones due to concerns about the security of the social-video app.“We have identified a small number of Wells Fargo employees with corporate-owned devices who had installed the TikTok application on their device,” a spokesman for the bank wrote in an emailed statement on Friday. “Due to concerns about TikTok’s privacy and security controls and practices, and because corporate-owned devices should be used for company business only, we have directed those employees to remove the app from their devices.”U.S. officials have raised questions about the security of TikTok, which is owned by Chinese company ByteDance Ltd. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo recently told Americans not to download the app unless they want to see their private information fall into “the hands of the Chinese Communist Party.”Read more: Trump Says He’s Considering a Ban on TikTok in the U.S.TikTok has repeatedly denied allegations that it poses a threat to U.S. national security. “User security is of the utmost importance to TikTok – we are fully committed to respecting the privacy of our users,” a TikTok spokesperson wrote in an email.Earlier on Friday, Amazon.com Inc. also told employees to delete TikTok from mobile devices they use to access company email, but the e-commerce giant later said that was a mistake. The Information reported Well Fargo’s decision earlier.Read more: TikTok Mulls Changes to Business to Distance Itself From ChinaFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Amazon’s Kuiper Satellite Plan Wins Backing of FCC Chair
    Bloomberg

    Amazon’s Kuiper Satellite Plan Wins Backing of FCC Chair

    (Bloomberg) -- Amazon.com’s plan for a fleet of 3,236 communications satellites won the backing of the U.S. Federal Communications Commission chairman, who said he had asked fellow commissioners to approve the venture.“Satellite constellations like this aim to provide high-speed broadband service to consumers in the U.S. and around the world,” Ajit Pai said in a tweet on Friday. Pai added that he had called for conditions on the proposed service by Amazon subsidiary Kuiper Systems without specifying them.Pai’s request is likely to result in approval in closed-door voting at the agency, where he leads a Republican majority.Amazon founder Jeff Bezos wants to launch the small satellites in low orbits to provide internet coverage. Separately, Space Exploration Technologies Corp., or SpaceX, has launched more than 480 of a planned 12,000 satellites; in October 2019, the company founded by Elon Musk sought permission for 30,000 more.The FCC coordinates coordinates trajectories and radio-frequency use.Amazon last year called Kuiper “a long-term project that envisions serving tens of millions of people who lack basic access to broadband internet.”“There are still too many communities where internet access is unreliable or prohibitively expensive” and Project Kuiper will help close that gap, Dave Limp, Amazon senior vice president for devices and services, said in an emailed message. “We appreciate that Chairman Pai shares our commitment to the issue.”(Updates with comment from Amazon in final paragraph.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Why The Shyft Group Stock Popped 14% Today
    Motley Fool

    Why The Shyft Group Stock Popped 14% Today

    Shares of The Shyft Group (NASDAQ: SHYF), an automotive company specializing in the manufacture of commercial delivery vans, and particularly vans designed to facilitate e-commerce deliveries, soared a staggering 14.1% in Friday trading after Reuters reported that the biggest e-commerce company on the block is placing a big order with Shyft. As Reuters explained, Amazon.com (NASDAQ: AMZN) is ordering 2,200 of Shyft's "Utilimaster" walk-in delivery vans. Indeed, according to the news organization, the order was apparently placed last year, and at least some of Shyft's trucks are already in Amazon's possession and have been "seen recently operating in Chicago."

  • Amazon Says Delete TikTok Email to Employees Was an Error
    Bloomberg

    Amazon Says Delete TikTok Email to Employees Was an Error

    (Bloomberg) -- Amazon.com Inc. said an email sent to employees instructing them to delete the social-media app TikTok from mobile devices they use to access company email was a mistake.In a statement Friday, the company said: “This morning’s email to some of our employees was sent in error. There is no change to our policies right now with regard to TikTok.”The online retailer had earlier instructed employees to delete the app by the end of the day. “Due to security risks, the TikTok app is no longer permitted on mobile devices that access Amazon email,” the initial message said. “If you have TikTok on your device, you must remove it by 10-Jul to retain mobile access to Amazon email.”U.S. officials have raised security concerns about TikTok, which is owned by Chinese company ByteDance Ltd. Secretary of State Michael Pompeo recently told Americans not to download the app unless they want to see their private information fall into “the hands of the Chinese Communist Party.”TikTok has repeatedly denied allegations that it poses a threat to U.S. national security.“User security is of the utmost importance to TikTok – we are fully committed to respecting the privacy of our users,” a TikTok spokesperson wrote in an email before Amazon said its message was sent in error.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg

    Amazon Delays Next Video Game Half a Year After Latest One Flops

    (Bloomberg) -- Following scathing reviews of a computer game it released in May, Amazon.com Inc. is delaying its next big-budget game by at least six months. The decision represents another setback for the technology giant’s ambitions to break into the gaming industry.The next game, New World, was supposed to debut in late August but is now scheduled for spring 2021, Rich Lawrence, director of Amazon’s game studio, wrote in a blog post Friday. The company wants extra time to implement changes suggested by players who have been testing the game, he wrote.Delays are fairly common in the video game industry, but this was an important opportunity for Amazon to redeem itself after a recent flop. Amazon is trying to make a name for itself as a maker of big-budget video games that can compete with those from the likes of Activision Blizzard Inc. and Electronic Arts Inc. But Amazon’s Crucible, a free-to-play PC game introduced in May, was panned by critics, prompting Amazon to take the highly unusual step of pulling the game from wide circulation.New World is a massively multiplayer online game where hundreds of players seek to colonize a fictional world filled with supernatural creatures. Customers who tested or pre-ordered the game will still be able to play it for “a period of time” starting Aug. 25, the company said.“We don’t make the decision lightly, and we have urgency about getting the game to you as quickly as possible at the best quality -- with some additions that will make the experience even better,” Lawrence wrote.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Nasdaq is 'moving faster than any train we've ever seen before': veteran strategist
    Yahoo Finance

    Nasdaq is 'moving faster than any train we've ever seen before': veteran strategist

    The Nasdaq is like "a train that is moving faster than any train we've ever seen before,” says one veteran strategist.

  • Motley Fool

    5 Ways the Pandemic Is Imperiling Retirement

    In this episode of the Motley Fool Answers podcast, hosts Alison Southwick and Robert Brokamp reveal three lessons related to the unveiling of The Motley Fool's new logo, including one from the best-performing stock of the past 25 years. To catch full episodes of all The Motley Fool's free podcasts, check out our podcast center. To get started investing, check out our quick-start guide to investing in stocks.

  • The best gadgets for the beach and pool: Tech Support
    Yahoo Finance

    The best gadgets for the beach and pool: Tech Support

    Heading to the beach or pool? These are the best headphones, ereaders, and more to bring with you.

  • 3 New Industries Amazon Could Dominate by 2030
    Motley Fool

    3 New Industries Amazon Could Dominate by 2030

    Amazon (NASDAQ: AMZN) shares have surged past $3,000 in recent days as investors bet that the e-commerce giant will emerge from the pandemic even stronger than it was before. CEO Jeff Bezos likes to say it's always Day One, and said in last year's shareholder letter, "Amazon today remains a small player in global retail," indicating he still believes there's plenty of opportunity for growth. In order to satisfy shareholder expectations, Amazon will have to execute on those opportunities.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Amazon, Walmart, Big Lots, Kroger, Costco and Shopify
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Amazon, Walmart, Big Lots, Kroger, Costco and Shopify

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Amazon, Walmart, Big Lots, Kroger, Costco and Shopify

  • Roku Has Upended the Cable TV Power Dynamic
    Motley Fool

    Roku Has Upended the Cable TV Power Dynamic

    Comcast (NASDAQ: CMCSA) is about 10 times as large as Roku (NASDAQ: ROKU) in terms of market cap. CNBC (owned by NBCUniversal) reported yesterday that NBCUniversal has been unable to finalize a distribution deal with Roku or Amazon.com for Peacock, which launches on July 15.

  • 3 Places Advertisers Are Still Increasing Spend Despite COVID-19
    Motley Fool

    3 Places Advertisers Are Still Increasing Spend Despite COVID-19

    Ad buyers expect overall ad spend to decline about 20% in the second half of 2020, according to a survey from IAB last month. Traditional media will see a decline in ad spend, but most digital advertising channels will grow considerably in the second half of 2020. 59% of connected TV advertisers expect to increase their spend in the second half of the year, according to IAB's survey.