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YouTube has pulled 30,000 videos for making false claims about COVID-19 vaccines

Karissa Bell
·Senior Editor
·1-min read

YouTube has pulled 30,000 videos for sharing misinformation about the COVID-19 vaccines, Axios reports. Details on the takedowns come six months after the company first updated its policies to address misinformation about the coronavirus vaccines.

Prior to October, YouTube had more general coronavirus misinformation policies, but those didn’t specifically address vaccines. The company has taken down more than 800,000 videos for spreading coronavirus misinformation since last February, according to Axios.

But as vaccine availability has increased, the issue of vaccine misinformation has become more urgent for platforms. Facebook and Twitter have also expanded their policies to combat misinformation about the vaccines in recent months. But unlike Facebook, which announced plans to curb misinformation about all vaccines, YouTube’s policies only address a specific subset of claims about the COVID-19 vaccines that contradict official guidance from the World Health Organization and other authorities.