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Woolworths sign explains why supermarket wants you to buy marked bananas

Shoppers will notice a difference to bananas in the fruit aisle, but there's a good reason not to be deterred.

Woolworths shoppers might walk away from a banana with marked skin under normal circumstances, but they may change their mind once reading this sign.

The supermarket giant will be putting signs in the fruit aisles to advise consumers why there are going to be spots and marks on some bananas after Queensland farmers were hit with extreme weather.

“The unprecedented rainfall in North Queensland brought on by Cyclone Jasper softened the skin of unpicked bananas on the trees, making them more sensitive to extra bumps and marks on the outside,” Woolworths said.

Do you have a story? Contact belinda.grantgeary@yahooinc.com

“However, it’s never been more true that it’s what’s on the inside that counts, and Woolworths is encouraging customers to look beyond skin-deep. The flesh of the bananas remains unaffected and delicious to eat.”

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In doing so, shoppers would be helping support farmers ravaged by extreme weather, like Dennis Howe, from How Farming Group, who has been supplying Woolies with bananas for more than 20 years.

Woolworths sign detailing why damaged bananas are on shelves and an inset of a man pushing a trolley into a Woolworths store.
Woolworths are putting a sign in store to advise why they may see damaged bananas in store. (Source: Supplied) (picture alliance via Getty Image)

Howe, who has 450 employees, said farmers have been forced to think creatively to ensure crops aren’t wasted, and hopes tactics like these can be used in the future to manage any other storms that come their way.

“We encourage shoppers to look beyond the skin and continue to shop our delicious bananas and support Aussie growers,” he said.

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Some weren’t as lucky, and the crops they toiled over were completely destroyed by gale force winds. Ausgrow finance manager Antony Joseph estimated a $250,000 loss when 25,000 of his banana trees were wiped out.

Almost $18 million in disaster payments were issued by the government to victims of the cyclone in Far North Queensland.

Woolworths said 100 per cent of their bananas are grown in Australia and 90 per cent from Queensland.

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