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'A budget for fairness': Welfare cheats and multinationals on 2017 hit list

Welfare cheats and multinationals not paying their fair share of tax will be the targets of what the Prime Minister calls "a budget for fairness".

Malcolm Turnbull has also announced big spending increases to help our national security agencies in a bid to keep us safe.

The Australian Federal Police quickly responded with a spectacular show of force to the 2017 budget, demonstrating what it will do more of with its extra funding.

The AFP will get $320 million to better fight terrorism, organised crime and street gangs.

There will be one hundred million for ASIO and for ASIS the overseas spy network 75 million targeting ISIS in Australia and in the Middle East.

"They are becoming more sophisticated, and so our resources, our technologies, need to match them,” Turnbull said.

The money will fund an extra 300 agents in intelligence, tactical response, covert surveillance and forensics.

"We're backing you with more resources," the PM continued.

Welfare cheats and multinationals not paying their fair share of tax will be the targets of what the Prime Minister calls a budget for fairness. Source: 7 News

Seven News can also reveal that included in the budget plan will be tough new measures to stop welfare cheats gaming the system and a new crackdown on multinational tax avoidance directing the proceeds to better services.

"We've got to guarantee those essential services that all Australians rely on,” Scott Morrison said.

Bill Shorten's latest attempt to draw those Australians to him by trumping up his message has backfired big-time after he was attacked for depicting a "white-bread Australia" in an advertisement.

"A Shorten Labor Government will build Australian first, buy Australian first and employ Australians first,” Shorten says in the widely criticised advert.

“Well, I think the ad's a shocker and it should never have been produced, and it should never be shown,” Anthony Albanese said after viewing it.

"I've had a look at the final production and I think we should have had more diversity in it and I will speak with the Labor party about that,” Shorten contested.