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Urgent warning over JB Hi-Fi ‘$750 voucher competition’

JB Hi-Fi customers have been warned about fake websites attempting to steal their personal information.

An image of the fake JB Hi-Fi wesbite.
JB Hi-Fi has warned customers about fraudulent websites impersonating the brand offering large prizes. (Source: Provided)

JB Hi-Fi has issued an urgent warning to Aussies about a fraudulent website impersonating the well-known brand.

JB Hi-Fi said the websites were using fake competitions, with the lure of large prizes, in an attempt to gain access to customers' personal information.

The website shows JB Hi-Fi branding with a large prize wheel, encouraging potential victims to give it a spin and potentially win a $750 voucher. Other prizes on the wheel include vouchers to get up to 50 per cent off your next order.

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JB Hi-Fi warned customers not to fall victim to the scam website and, if in doubt, to contact the team directly at onlinesupport@jbhifi.com.au.

Scams on the rise

This comes as Aussies have seen a growing number of scams, with total financial losses topping $568 million in 2022, according to Scamwatch. Shockingly, that figure is significantly higher than the $175 million lost to scams in 2020.

In response to the growing number of scams, the government has proposed a new message registry.

The registry would act as a “blocking list” for scammers and stop the criminals from impersonating government agencies and trusted brands.

The federal government has asked the Australian Communications and Media Authority to investigate the proposal, which has been successful in stopping scammers in other countries.

And while the $568 million figure was officially lost to scams, the real figure is likely much higher, with the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission estimating only around a third of financial losses to scams are actually reported.

Assistant Treasurer Stephen Jones said Aussies were likely losing about $4 billion each year to scams.

"Enough is enough. Everyone needs to take this seriously, from banks, to telcos, to social media platforms," Jones told AAP.

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