Australia Markets close in 2 hrs 53 mins

Twitter to add a way to 'memorialize' accounts for deceased users before removing inactive ones

Darrell Etherington
The Twitter Inc. logo is displayed outside the company's headquarters in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018. Twitter Inc. soared the most since its market debut in 2013 after it posted the first revenue growth in four quarters, driven by improvements to its app and added video content that are persuading advertisers to boost spending on the social network. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Twitter has changed its tune regarding inactive accounts after receiving a lot of user feedback: It will now be developing a way to "memorialize" user accounts for those who have passed away, before proceeding with a plan it confirmed this week to deactivate accounts that are inactive in order to "present more accurate, credible information" on the service.

To the company's credit, it reacted swiftly after receiving a significant amount of negative feedback on this move, and it seems like the case of deceased users simply wasn't considered in the decision to proceed with terminating dormant accounts.

After Twitter confirmed the inactive account (those that haven't tweeted in more than six months) cleanup on Tuesday, a number of users noted that this would also have the effect of erasing the content of accounts whose owners have passed away. TechCrunch alum Drew Olanoff wrote about this impact from a personal perspective, asking Twitter to reconsider their move in light of the human impact and potential emotional cost.

In a thread today detailing their new thinking around inactive accounts, Twitter explained that its current inactive account policy has actually always been in place, but that they haven't been diligent about enforcing it. They're going to begin doing so in the European Union partly in accordance with local privacy laws, citing GDPR specifically. But the company also says it will now not be removing any inactive accounts before first implementing a way for inactive accounts belonging to deceased users to be "memorialized," which presumably means preserving their content.

Twitter went on to say that it might expand or refine its inactive account policy to ensure it works with global privacy regulations, but will be sure to communicate these changes broadly before they go into effect.

It's not yet clear what Twitter will do to offer this 'memorialization' of accounts, but there is some precedent they can look to for cues: Facebook has a 'memorialized accounts' feature that it introduced for similar reasons.

You can take my Dad’s tweets over my dead body