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Twilio's $3.2B Segment acquisition is about helping developers build data-fueled apps

Ron Miller
·3-min read
A monitor displays Twilio Inc. signage on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York, U.S., on Friday, April 27, 2018. U.S. stocks were mixed as euphoria from better-than-forecast earnings reports faded with investors contemplating the implications of higher interest rates in an economy that may be cooling. Photographer: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A monitor displays Twilio Inc. signage on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York, U.S., on Friday, April 27, 2018. U.S. stocks were mixed as euphoria from better-than-forecast earnings reports faded with investors contemplating the implications of higher interest rates in an economy that may be cooling. Photographer: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The pandemic has forced businesses to change the way they interact with customers. Whether it's how they deliver goods and services, or how they communicate, there is one common denominator, and that's that everything is being forced to be digitally driven much faster.

To some extent, that's what drove Twilio to acquire Segment for $3.2 billion today. (We wrote about the deal over the weekend. Forbes broke the story last Friday night.) When you get down to it, the two companies fit together well, and expand the platform by giving Twilio customers access to valuable customer data. Chee Chew, Twilio's chief product officer, says while it may feel like the company is pivoting in the direction of customer experience, they don't necessarily see it that way.

"A lot of people have thought about us as a communications company, but we think of ourselves as a customer engagement company. We really think about how we help businesses communicate more effectively with their customers," Chew told TechCrunch.

Laurie McCabe, co-founder and partner at SMB Group, sees the move related to the pandemic and the need companies have to serve customers in a more fully digital way. "More customers are realizing that delivering a great customer experience is key to survive through the pandemic, and thriving as the economy recovers -- and are willing to spend to do this even in uncertain times," McCabe said.

Certainly Chew recognized that Segment gives them something they were lacking by providing developers with direct access to customer data, and that could lead to some interesting applications.

"The data capabilities that Segment has are providing a full view of the customer. It really layers across everything we do. I think of it as a horizontal add across the channels and extending beyond. So I think it really helps us advance in a different sort of way [...] towards getting the holistic view of the customer and enabling our customers to build intelligence services on top," he said.

Brent Leary, founder and principal analyst at CRM Essentials, sees Segment helping to provide a powerful data-fueled developer experience. "This move allows Twilio to impact the data-insight-interaction-experience transformation process by removing friction from developers using their platform," Leary explained. In other words, it gives developers that ability that Chew alluded to, to use data to build more varied applications using Twilio APIs.

Paul Greenberg, author of CRM at the Speed of Light, and founder and principal analyst at 56 Group, agrees, saying, "Segment gives Twilio the ability to use customer data in what is already a powerful unified communications platform and hub. And since it is, in effect, APIs for both, the flexibility [for developers] is enormous," he said.

That may be so, but Holger Mueller, an analyst at Constellation Research, says the company has to be seeing that the pure communication parts of the platform like SMS are becoming increasingly commoditized, and this deal, along with the SendGrid acquisition in 2018, gives Twilio a place to expand its platform into a much more lucrative data space.

"Twilio needs more growth path and it looks like its strategy is moving up the stack, at least with the acquisition of Segment. Data movement and data residence compliance is a huge headache for enterprises when they build their next generation applications," Mueller said.

As Chew said, early on the problems were related to building SMS messages into applications and that was the problem that Twilio was trying to solve because that's what developers needed at the time, but as it moves forward, it wants to provide a more unified customer communications experience, and Segment should help advance that capability in a big way for them.