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Warning about new scam targeting millions of Aussies

Lucy Dean
·2-min read
Cyber attack using the phishing technique. Digital illustration.
(Image: Gett).

Millions of Australians have been warned to be on the lookout against a new scam targeting Bigpond, Telstra and TPG customers.

The email scam, which Scamwatch raised the alarm about on Friday, warns customers that their service will be cancelled unless they update their details.

However, this is nothing but a dangerous scam, Scamwatch said.

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“The emails may look legitimate but are just an attempt at stealing your information. Don’t click on any links and delete the email,” it said on Twitter.

The TPG scam uses TPG logos and colours to fool the victims.

It reads:

“Dear TPG Customer,

There are security updates on our servers. To ensure that the service will not be interrupted, you Need to update your details. It’s easily and safety.”

The email then asks users to click a link to “update” their details, with a warning that failure to update will result in a temporary disconnection.

However, there are some clear signs this is a scam, including spelling and grammatical errors in the body of the email and in the email address.

Australians have been attacked by an unprecedented volume of scams in the last year, with $63.1 million lost in just the first three months of this year.

That’s an increase of 73 per cent on the same period in 2020.

“One of the more troubling trends we’ve observed over the last quarter is that Australians are losing more money despite an overall decrease in the total number of scams reported,” cybersecurity firm Proofpoint ANZ area vice-president Crispin Kerr said.

"This suggests cybercriminals are becoming more effective and damaging in their targeting, extracting greater sums of money from Australians with less attempts."