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The White House is examining how companies use AI to monitor workers

The company is soliciting input from workers, advocacy groups and researchers.

Kevin Lamarque / reuters

The Biden administration is preparing to examine how companies use artificial intelligence to monitor and manage workers. According to Bloomberg, the White House will publish a blog post later today that invites American workers to share how automated tools are being used in their workplaces.

“While these technologies can benefit both workers and employers in some cases, they can also create serious risks to workers,” the post states, per Bloomberg. “The constant tracking of performance can push workers to move too fast on the job, posing risks to their safety and mental health.” Citing media reports, the White House adds the technology has also been used to deter workers from organizing their workplaces and to perpetuate pay and discipline discrimination.

The blog post calls for input from a variety of stakeholders, including researchers, advocacy groups and even employers. Notably, the Biden administration says it wants to know what regulations and enforcement action the federal government should implement to address the “economic, safety, physical, mental and emotional impacts” of workplace surveillance tech.

The call for information comes after a handful of states passed laws against unreasonable productivity quotas. Specifically, New York’s Warehouse Worker Protection Act grants workers the right to request information on their quota at any time. It also prohibits companies from imposing productivity demands that interfere with an employee’s state-mandated meal and restroom breaks.