Australia markets open in 9 hours 42 minutes
  • ALL ORDS

    7,759.30
    +5.00 (+0.06%)
     
  • AUD/USD

    0.7520
    +0.0024 (+0.32%)
     
  • ASX 200

    7,443.40
    +2.40 (+0.03%)
     
  • OIL

    83.84
    +0.08 (+0.10%)
     
  • GOLD

    1,801.00
    -5.80 (-0.32%)
     
  • BTC-AUD

    83,051.55
    -1,158.41 (-1.38%)
     
  • CMC Crypto 200

    1,500.40
    +1,257.72 (+518.26%)
     

The Morning After: The verdict on Nintendo’s OLED Switch

·Bureau Chief, UK
·5-min read

If you wanted to own a Nintendo Switch, you probably have one by now, unless you were waiting for the long-rumored Pro model. Sadly, the OLED Switch, which we put through its paces here, is not the 4K-upscaling, next-gen Nintendo console we dreamed of.

The Morning After
The Morning After

It does, however, pack a bigger gorgeous OLED screen, better battery life (despite what appears to be the same internal parts) and a slightly more modern design. That means fewer bezels, a kickstand you might actually use and a redesigned dock.

The biggest question is: Who is this for? Both the original Switch and the Lite are cheaper and offer largely the same gaming experience — if you play through a TV, it’s exactly the same.

For the early adopters — or handheld gamers — the OLED model appears more attractive. A bigger screen and better battery life are both boons for mobile gamers. But is it enough for you to stump up $350, especially when we’re all waiting for Nintendo to announce a more notable console upgrade. Despite Nintendo's upfront denial, a new console can’t be too far away. The question for would-be OLED Switch buyers is: How long till the next Nintendo console arrives? Read Kris Naudus' full review right here.

— Mat Smith

Twitch responds to massive data breach

It says it was “due to an error in a Twitch server configuration.”

Twitch logo
Twitch logo

Twitch has released an update on a massive hack that appears to have exposed source code, streamer payment figures and other information. It said data was exposed to the internet "due to an error in a Twitch server configuration change that was subsequently accessed by a malicious third party." It added its teams are working with "urgency" to investigate the attack. The streaming site believes no login credentials, including passwords, were exposed.

Yesterday, attackers said they stole the "entirety of Twitch.tv," including the site's mobile, desktop and console Twitch clients. It also accessed proprietary SDKs and internal AWS services. All of this could make Twitch vulnerable to future attacks by letting potential hackers probe for weaknesses.

Continue reading.

Apple says apps must offer a way to delete your account starting in early 2022

Users in some countries have another way to report issues with apps, too.

Developers who let users create an account in their iOS, iPadOS and macOS apps will have to offer a method of deleting accounts in apps from January 31st. Apple announced this requirement, alongside other App Store guideline changes, at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference back in June as part of a push to give users more control over their data.

Continue reading.

One person’s quest for the perfect wireless mouse

Click here.

The Morning After
The Morning After

Mice are not sexy computer peripherals. But for those of us tethered to computer screens, they’re often crucial. James Trew, while negotiating some pretty bad RSI, decided it was time to upgrade his setup and tested out mice from some of the biggest companies, including Microsoft and Logitech. His demands were humble enough: a focus on ergonomics. But which mouse won out?

Continue reading.

European Parliament calls for a ban on facial recognition in public spaces

It wants to prohibit private facial recognition databases like Clearview AI.

The European Parliament has called on lawmakers in the European Union to ban automated facial recognition in public spaces and to enforce strict safeguards for police use of artificial intelligence.

MEPs (members of European Parliament) said citizens should only be monitored when they're suspected of a crime. They cited concerns over algorithmic bias in AI and argued both human supervision and legal protections are required to avoid discrimination.

The MEPs also called on EU officials to ban private facial recognition databases (some law enforcement agencies in Europe are using Clearview AI's one), as well as "predictive policing based on behavioral data."

Continue reading.

Google Maps adds a dedicated 'lite' navigation mode for cyclists

You won't need to enter the full turn-by-turn interface to use the feature.

Google Maps is adding a dedicated navigation mode for those who like to travel from place to place on two wheels. Taking the turn-by-turn functionality that Maps is known for, the tool allows you to see important details about your current trip without keeping your phone’s screen turned on. You don’t need to enter the full turn-by-turn interface to use the feature. At a glance, you’ll also see your current ETA.

Continue reading.

HMD's first Nokia tablet features a huge battery and costs $250

The T20 can go nearly 15 hours between charges and offers optional LTE.

Nokia has dabbled in tablets before, like the iPad knockoff N1, but has only released smartphones since the brand was purchased by HMD Global. Now, HMD/Nokia have launched their first tablet together, the 10.4-inch T20, with the key features being a large battery, cheap price and US availability.

While you don’t get bombshell looks for that $250 price tag, the specs, at least, seem respectable for a cheap Android tablet and HMD’s track record with Nokia phones has been pretty strong, offering solid smartphones at pretty reasonable prices. The Nokia T20 is available from today.

Continue reading.

GM unveils a hands-free driving system that works in nearly all of the US and Canada

That includes highways, city streets and virtually any paved rural road.

Since General Motors introduced its Super Cruise driver-assist system back in 2017, GM and Cadillac drivers have apparently traveled more than 10 million miles with their hands off the wheel.

With its next-generation hands-free system, Ultra Cruise, GM claims will "ultimately enable hands-free driving in 95 percent of all driving scenarios." Ultra is designed to work virtually everywhere in the US and Canada. At launch, the system should work on 2 million miles of North American roads — that includes highways, city and subdivision streets and paved rural roads — and will eventually expand to encompass some 3.4 million miles of asphalt.

Continue reading.

The biggest news stories you might have missed

Facebook is slowing down product development for 'reputational reviews,' report says

WHO approves the world's first malaria vaccine

T-Mobile wireless home internet service now costs $10 less

Canon created a dual fisheye lens for a new VR video system

Amazon secures giant tax breaks despite record profits and questionable labor practices

JLab's $79 wireless office headset has a removable earcup and a 60-hour battery

AT&T is reportedly One America News' primary financial backer

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting