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Poly’s Voyager Free 60+ might be the slickest earbuds for work yet

Not only does its case have a built-in screen, it also has a broadcast mode that works with wired audio devices.

Sam Rutherford/Engadget

There are so many wireless earbuds on the market it’s gotten hard for a new pair to stand out, especially when it comes to enterprise-focused options. But Poly’s Voyager Free 60+ buds may have just broken through thanks to a couple of innovative features.

Like many of its rivals, the Voyager Free 60+ features a true wireless design and comes with a Qi charging case. The stems of each bud supports touch controls for adjusting playback, while three mics and active noise cancellation help ensure both your voice and your audio sounds clear. However, where things get interesting is when you check out the display built into the case, which is only the second of its kind following the release of JBL’s Tour PRO 2 buds back in August.

By tapping and swiping on the display, you can quickly do things like adjust volume, toggle ANC, check battery status, switch between paired devices and more. This means you can leave your phone or laptop in your bag or pocket while you focus on your call. And with the Voyager Free 60+ capable of remembering up to eight different devices (with two being paired at the same time), multi-device management is a cinch.

However, my favorite thing about the Voyager Free 60+ is its broadcast mode. This allows you to use the included 3.5mm to USB-C cable to connect the case to an older device with a headphone jack (like when you’re on an airplane), so you can watch movies during a flight without needing to carry a second set of headphones around. Sure, it’s a bit of a niche situation, but for frequent travelers, it’s a great way to streamline your luggage.

The screen on the Voyager Free 60+'s charging case can be used to quickly adjust settings like volume, ANC, and more.
The screen on the Voyager Free 60+'s charging case can be used to quickly adjust settings like volume, ANC, and more.

Additionally, despite being made for the enterprise world, the Voyager Free 60+ sound great. Mids and highs are crisp and vibrant, and while I’d like a bit more thump in lower tones, there’s still more than an acceptable amount of bass. (Poly says the firmware on the demo device I tried wasn't final, so audio balance may be different on retail models). I also appreciate some of the smaller details like the inclusion of different-sized eartips and a bonus travel pouch that holds both the charging case and all of the earbuds’ included accessories. You even get the ability to choose between a USB-A or USB-C dongle for simple pairing with a phone or laptop. And because the earbuds support dual-mode connectivity, you can also connect to devices via Bluetooth.

By using the included 3.5mm to USB-C cable, you can plug older devices into the Voyager Free 60+'s case and use broadcast mode to send audio wirelessly to the earbuds.
By using the included 3.5mm to USB-C cable, you can plug older devices into the Voyager Free 60+'s case and use broadcast mode to send audio wirelessly to the earbuds.

The biggest challenge for Poly’s Voyager Free 60+, though, is that priced at $350, it costs more than a lot of other high-end earbuds including the AirPods Pro and the Sony WF-1000XM4. Now I should mention that there will be a slightly less expensive non-plus version of the Voyager Free 60 buds that come with a more traditional case without a built-in screen, but even these cheaper models will start at $299.99. So despite some fancy features that could be very useful for business travelers, unless you can sweet talk your company’s IT department into upgrading your gadget kit, they might be hard sell when they come out sometime in March.