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What the NBA bubble can tell us about the future of sports

Richard Lawler
·Senior News Editor
·1-min read

Sports leagues are the most public face of the struggle to balance every day comforts with the realities of COVID-19, and the NBA is no exception. The league’s last season finished with an abbreviated slate of regular season and playoff games that happened in a “bubble” environment at Disney in Florida, and now games are being played in (mostly) empty arenas around the country.

Yahoo Sports reporter Chris Haynes spent 106 days in the Orlando bubble and continues to report on the league, so I spoke with him about some of the lessons learned from this summer’s experience, and what they mean for basketball as fans, players and teams deal with the new reality.