Australia markets closed
  • ALL ORDS

    7,361.90
    +37.00 (+0.51%)
     
  • AUD/USD

    0.7014
    -0.0014 (-0.19%)
     
  • ASX 200

    7,105.40
    +41.10 (+0.58%)
     
  • OIL

    87.97
    -1.44 (-1.61%)
     
  • GOLD

    1,789.40
    -8.70 (-0.48%)
     
  • BTC-AUD

    34,274.03
    -170.83 (-0.50%)
     
  • CMC Crypto 200

    569.90
    -20.86 (-3.53%)
     

Do Metals X's (ASX:MLX) Earnings Warrant Your Attention?

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
·3-min read
In this article:
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.

Like a puppy chasing its tail, some new investors often chase 'the next big thing', even if that means buying 'story stocks' without revenue, let alone profit. But as Peter Lynch said in One Up On Wall Street, 'Long shots almost never pay off.'

If, on the other hand, you like companies that have revenue, and even earn profits, then you may well be interested in Metals X (ASX:MLX). While that doesn't make the shares worth buying at any price, you can't deny that successful capitalism requires profit, eventually. Conversely, a loss-making company is yet to prove itself with profit, and eventually the sweet milk of external capital may run sour.

View our latest analysis for Metals X

How Fast Is Metals X Growing Its Earnings Per Share?

In a capitalist society capital chases profits, and that means share prices tend rise with earnings per share (EPS). So like the hint of a smile on a face that I love, growing EPS generally makes me look twice. You can imagine, then, that it almost knocked my socks off when I realized that Metals X grew its EPS from AU$0.012 to AU$0.066, in one short year. When you see earnings grow that quickly, it often means good things ahead for the company. But the key is discerning whether something profound has changed, or if this is a just a one-off boost.

Careful consideration of revenue growth and earnings before interest and taxation (EBIT) margins can help inform a view on the sustainability of the recent profit growth. The good news is that Metals X is growing revenues, and EBIT margins improved by 40.6 percentage points to 44%, over the last year. That's great to see, on both counts.

You can take a look at the company's revenue and earnings growth trend, in the chart below. For finer detail, click on the image.

earnings-and-revenue-history
earnings-and-revenue-history

While it's always good to see growing profits, you should always remember that a weak balance sheet could come back to bite. So check Metals X's balance sheet strength, before getting too excited.

Are Metals X Insiders Aligned With All Shareholders?

Like standing at the lookout, surveying the horizon at sunrise, insider buying, for some investors, sparks joy. That's because insider buying often indicates that those closest to the company have confidence that the share price will perform well. However, insiders are sometimes wrong, and we don't know the exact thinking behind their acquisitions.

The good news for Metals X shareholders is that no insiders reported selling shares in the last year. So it's definitely nice that Executive Director Brett Smith bought AU$19k worth of shares at an average price of around AU$0.47.

Should You Add Metals X To Your Watchlist?

Metals X's earnings per share growth have been levitating higher, like a mountain goat scaling the Alps. Growth investors should find it difficult to look past that strong EPS move. And in fact, it could well signal a fundamental shift in the business economics. If that's the case, you may regret neglecting to put Metals X on your watchlist. Still, you should learn about the 2 warning signs we've spotted with Metals X (including 1 which is significant) .

As a growth investor I do like to see insider buying. But Metals X isn't the only one. You can see a a free list of them here.

Please note the insider transactions discussed in this article refer to reportable transactions in the relevant jurisdiction.

Have feedback on this article? Concerned about the content? Get in touch with us directly. Alternatively, email editorial-team (at) simplywallst.com.

This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. We provide commentary based on historical data and analyst forecasts only using an unbiased methodology and our articles are not intended to be financial advice. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. We aim to bring you long-term focused analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material. Simply Wall St has no position in any stocks mentioned.

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting