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Latitude Financial hack: Millions of Aussies eligible to join class action

Millions of customer details have been exposed in the breach, including driver’s licences and passport numbers.

Latitude Financial hack
Latitude Financial is facing a potential class action over its data breach. (Source: Latitude Financial/Getty)

Latitude Financial is facing a potential class action lawsuit, after 14 million customer records were stolen in the cyberattack.

Law firms Gordon Legal and Hayden Stephens and Associates have teamed up to investigate a possible class action against the lender.

Latitude Financial provides finance to customers through stores including JB Hi-Fi, The Good Guys and Harvey Norman. It also offers credit cards and personal loans.

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On Monday, Latitude revealed 7.9 million Australian and New Zealand driver’s licence numbers, 53,000 passport numbers, and fewer than 100 financial statements had been stolen. A further 6.1 million customer records, including names, addresses, phone numbers and dates of birth, were also compromised.

"We are deeply concerned about the impact of this data breach on Latitude customers," Gordon Legal partner James Naughton said.

"We are investigating how a breach of this size could occur. Latitude customers deserve to understand their legal rights and the steps that have been taken to protect their personal data.”

The Latitude breach is now one of the biggest in Australian history. It follows a string of other breaches, including attacks on Medibank and Optus. Other law firms are also investigating potential class actions over these breaches.

Who is eligible for the class action?

Current and former customers of Latitude Financial, as well as anyone who has been notified that their information has been exposed, are eligible to register for the potential class action.

To register, you will need to provide your name, email address and phone number.

By registering you will get access to updates about the case, as well as reminders of court dates should the case move forward. Registering is free to do and there is currently no deadline.

Latitude Financial is advising impacted customers to be vigilant with all online communications and transactions and to look out for any suspicious behaviour.

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